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What do y'all think about this Hillary Clinton meme???

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Another undercover white person stumping for Trump

Donald Trump now claims his controversial suggestion that women should be punished for having an abortion “was an unbelievable academic answer.”

Now, he’s issued another clarification — and it might be the most confusing one yet.

He told MSNBC’s Willie Geist:

He was asking me a theoretical, or just a question in theory, and I talked about it only from that standpoint. Of course not. And that was done, he said, you know, I guess it was theoretically, but he was asking me a rhetorical question, and I gave an answer. And by the way, people thought from an academic standpoint, and asked rhetorically, people said that answer was an unbelievable academic answer. But of course not, and I said that afterwards. Everybody understands that.
 

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Where Trayvon,Jordan Davis,Sandra Bland and Eric Garner mothers at now??
Published: April 3, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark., March 27—
Two years ago England, Ark., a town with a recent history of racial tensions, was about to blow again.

A fight in the high school playground between a black student and a white student had escalated to a larger racial confrontation. Black parents kept their children home from school. Whites felt the incident was overblown. The Knights of the Klu Klux Klan began distributing inflammatory leaflets in England, a town of nearly 4,000 people 22 miles southeast of Little Rock.

Using a racial epithet, they charged blacks wwith disrupting "law and order," and warned, "If you think you have troubles NOW, wait until the minorities become the MAJORITY."

After that, Gov. Bill Clinton decided to get involved.

He came to town and met privately with an integrated group of residents, urging them to form a biracial committee to work out their problems. His efforts bore fruit. A committee was set up, the two sides started to talk and tensions were defused. To Mr. Clinton's supporters, his performance typified his ability to forge biracial coalitions that work through racial animus. Bridging the Divide

Most Arkansans agree that under Governor Clinton more blacks and women have been appointed to boards, commissions and departments than under any other chief executive in the state's history. Mr. Clinton has appointed blacks to influential positions as the state's chief financial officer, health commissioner and head of the Department of Social Services, Arkansas' largest state agency.

"I never detected any reluctance on his part to appoint blacks to important positions in state government because of their color," said Mahlon A. Martin, president of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation. "If fact, he made an affirmative effort to do so."


Mr. Clinton appointed Mr. Martin as director of the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration, the state's top fiscal job. He was the first and only black to hold that position. Legal Protection for Blacks
 

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So, I have considered a couple of key reasons why I think African Americans should throw their support and vote to Hillary Clinton. This does in no way reduce the political efficacy and acumen of the other candidates from the Democratic or Republican Party, but I claim that Hillary Clinton should be the candidate for African Americans in the United States for seven key reasons.

First, Hillary has a long and impressive track record for supporting children and families. Her allegiance to humanity and the pivotal role that families play on a variety of fronts is impressive, consistent in her message, and evident in her own life walk. From her days of lobbying and pushing for universal health care to her focus on social and economic development and empowerment, Hillary has carved out a clear history of supporting the backbone of American democracy, and haven’t turned her gaze away from focusing on strengthening families all across America. As a testament to this fact, Hillary Co-founded the Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families.

She has been a strong voice for children, especially those living on the margins and languishing in the corners of desolation and poverty. She has relentlessly championed the cause of health care reform and have been a persistent voice in helping to increase access to a myriad of health care services for people in small towns, rural communities, and inner-cities. Hence, at every level of her professional political career, including her time serving under the Obama administration, she has maintained a steady position with respect to her stance on advocating and advancing the cause for women, minorities, and children.

Second, Hillary at least has been trustworthy. While I know most Republicans and her other competitors would disagree, I feel Hillary will be and has been honest with the voters and will not try to engage in forces or activities that would dupe the American people. Washington is full of deals that have to be made in order to get the things you want. So, Hillary is no stranger to that political game. And she has the political savviness, wit, and tenacity to stand with bold proclivity against the powerful lobbyist, oligarchs, and plutocrats in Washington.

Moreover, I think that African American people have come to know her and trust her from former President Clinton’s era and her own work as First Lady, Secretary of State, and within the context of the broader society. Trust is a scarce commodity among most politicians, yet Hillary has tried to maintain consistency in this area among voters and even her adversaries. When faced with public scrutiny concerning a number of hot-button issues that manages to crop up from time to time, she remains poised and responds with honesty, frankness, and integrity. She’s the type of leader that takes responsibility for her actions, and makes a concerted effort to address and rectify areas of concern.

Third, Hillary has a great degree of experience at almost all levels of government. Her professional prowess and informed upbringing makes her a formable candidate to be our next commander-in-chief. Her very important governmental roles, especially as Secretary of State has made her name as common as globalization is to the world market. She has devoted much of her life to public service despite the gusty winds and vitriolic nature of politics. She is the definition of resilience and perseverance. Her unyielding convictions about issues that matter domestically and abroad have been evident in both policy and in practice.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/herron-keyon-gaston/why-african-americans-sho_b_9151520.html
 

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But Trump’s open racism should come as no surprise. Many people learn how to approach the world from their parents. Trump’s father, Fred Trump, was arrested at a Ku Klux Klan rally in 1927. None other than the great political songwriter Woody Guthrie singled Fred Trump out as a vicious racist. In the 1970s, Trump and his father were sued by the Justice Department for systematically refusing to rent their apartments to black tenants. A decade later, Trump took out full-page ads calling for the execution of five young black men who were accused — falsely, it turned out — of raping and savagely beating a jogger in Central Park.

Trump’s racially tinged presidential campaign is part of a continuum that goes back to the 1980s and a refinement of the Southern strategy, a political plan devised by former Reagan campaign guru Lee Atwater and former Nixon aide Roger Stone, according to Trump biographer Wayne Barrett.

“The Southern strategy was, ‘Let’s make the Democrats the black party and the Republicans the white party,’” Barrett said in an interview. “Trump was very close to the Reagan people.”


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/donald-trump-racist_us_572a105fe4b096e9f08fd0c9?utm_hp_ref=politics
 

Watcher

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Trump probably will win the GE.

Have to give white people credit...no matter what they stick together when they have to. The things Trump and Cruz said about each other I did not think they would unite. Cruz dropped out and Trump said kind things about Cruz.

Meanwhile Bernie supporters have...


The OP posting this is another good example. Stumping for Trump because he couldn't have it his way.

No crying about white people and the kkk after Trump wins. You all are responsible.

 

ballscout1

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BGOL Investor


Clinton’s sole leftward economic conversion was on trade. Early in the campaign, Clinton told a reporter she opposed the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which she had helped craft during her tenure at the State Department. This was real movement, but it probably won’t matter. President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans had the votes to pass TPP last year. It’s just a question of when House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) decides to bring it to the floor (hint: lame-duck session).

In the months since this reversal, Clinton has attacked single-payer health care and repeatedly defended her paid speeches to Goldman Sachs by invoking the logic ofCitizens United. On Wall Street reform, she has maintained her original position of implementing Dodd-Frank (with a few new disclosures). Her top economist supporters havedismissed the too-big-to-fail banking problem as unimportant. When the Sanders campaign touted research from a liberal academic, Clinton’s economic braintrust smearedhim without even reading his analysis.

Clinton herself continues to defend the 1994 welfare reform bill, which was designed to cut public assistance to the poor, and succeeded in doing so. She downplayed the entire issue of economic inequality on the grounds that solving it will not fix racism (no word on how it would impact the “super predator” problem). Her position on the minimum wage is a number salad.

Clinton, in short, remains a proponent of bread-and-circuses liberalism, not a critic of corporate power or structural economic inequality. Sanders hasn’t pushed her to the left. At best, he has driven her to say weird things in public.
 

Mask

"OneOfTheBest"
Platinum Member
The OP posting this is another good example. Stumping for Trump because he couldn't have it his way.



You have no idea, I give zero fucks about either....Bernice, Billiary, Trump
Obama(just a fan of the person not the job), Bushes or whoever else coming...


 

ballscout1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Bill Clinton’s gutsy apologies: Now he owes one to Ricky Ray Rector
To look tough on crime, Clinton oversaw execution of a man so mentally ill he asked to save his last meal for later

Because it’s the most painful, I think we should start with the case of Ricky Ray Rector, whose execution Clinton made part of his campaign for president. Rector was no angel. He was a convicted double murderer. In 1981, he killed one man for refusing a friend entry to a night club, and he killed the second—a long-time friend, who was a police officer—when he came at Rector’s request to arrest him. But here’s the twist: Rector also tried to kill himself, immediately after the second murder. Instead, he gave himself a partial lobotomy, leaving himself deeply incapacitated with an IQ of about 70. It left him a completely different, utterly helpless and dependent man.




There had been an earlier case, Ford v. Wainwright, in 1986, in which the Supreme Court held it was unconstitutional to execute the insane. While Rector’s initial lawyers had not been very able, he eventually was represented by lawyers who appealed his case to the Supreme Court, arguing that the same principle should apply to the mentally incompetent as well. The Supreme Court refused to hear the case, but Thurgood Marshall—who wrote the decision in Ford v. Wainwright—took the unusual step of filing a dissent from that refusal, in which he wrote:




The issue in this case is not only unsettled, but is also recurring and important. The stark realities are that many death row inmates were afflicted with serious mental impairments before they committed their crimes and that many more develop such impairments during the excruciating interval between sentencing and execution…. Unavoidably, then, the question whether such persons can be put to death once the deterioration of their faculties has rendered them unable even to appeal to the law or the compassion of the society that has condemned them is central to the administration of the death penalty in this Nation. I would therefore grant the petition for certiorari in order to resolve now the questions left unanswered by our decision in Ford v. Wainwright.




In 2008, after Bill Clinton’s intemperate response to Obama winning the South Carolina primary shocked many in media, Chris Kromm, of the Institute for Southern Studies, looked back at how Ricky Ray Rector’s fate intersected with Bill Clinton in that campaign–one in which no Democrat wanted to face a “Willie Horton ad” like the one that helped destroy Michael Dukakis in 1988:




It was almost exactly this time of year 16 years ago that then-Gov. Bill Clinton, eager to break away from a tight pack of 1992 Democratic primary hopefuls, decided crime would be one his big-ticket issues. Democrats should “no longer feel guilty about protecting the innocent,” he would proclaim from the campaign trail.




How did candidate Clinton choose to show he was “tough on crime?” By flying down to Arkansas, mid-campaign, to personally preside over the execution of Ricky Ray Rector, a mentally retarded African-American man.




It was only the third death sentence carried out in Arkansas since 1973, and Clinton made a point of being on hand for the TV crews when Rector was killed by lethal injection on January 24, 1992.




In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that executing persons who are mentally retarded is “cruel and unusual punishment.” And in the court of public opinion, many African-Americans judged that Clinton–far from being a “black president”–was in reality another white president who was all too willing to use race when it suited him.




Kromm went on to quote Margaret Kimberley at The Black Commentator:




[R]icky Ray Rector became world famous upon his execution in 1992. Then Governor Bill Clinton left the campaign trail in January of that year to sign the warrant for Rector’s execution. Rector’s mental capacity was such that when taken from his cell as a “dead man walking” he told a guard to save his pie. He thought he would return to finish his dessert.




I try to remember this story when I am told that all Black people love Bill Clinton or that he should be considered the first Black president. Clinton wasn’t Black when Rector needed him. He was just another politician who didn’t want to be labeled soft on crime.




The truth is that Bill Clinton has a complicated history of racial relations, and even some black politicians in his shoes would have done exactly the same thing. But if moving forward wholeheartedly requires us to acknowledge past errors, then Ricky Ray Rector’s execution is one more thing that Clinton should publicly regret.




The next year—his first year as president—Bill Clinton had a rocky relationship with black women when he backed out of two high-profile nominations. The first wasJohnnetta Cole, the first black female president of Spelman College, who headed Clinton’s transition team for education, labor, the arts and humanities, and was slated to be selected as Secretary of Education. Her nomination was squelched after the Jewish Daily Forward reported she’d been a member of the national committee of the Venceremos Brigade, which the always-reliable FBI said was connected to Cuba’s intelligence agencies. Nothing further needed to be said: guilt by association was automatically assumed.




The attack against Lani Guinier was far more extensive, protracted, and baseless. Guinier was a former staff attorney with the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, who had moved from being one of their top attorneys, heading their Voting Rights project, to proving herself a top-flight academic, at the University of Pennsylvania, with a series of sweeping, but well-grounded and sophisticated law review articles (most collected in her first book, “Tyranny of the Majority: Fundamental Fairness in Representative Democracy“), in which she argued for a need to rethink approaches to voting rights law, to avoid what she identified as a number of blind alleys. At the time, Guinier was only the second person ever appointed to head the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division who actually had a background in the relevant law—both as a litigator and an academic. Yet she was shamelessly and ridiculously attacked as a “quota queen” (a blatant echo of the “welfare queen” slur), when perhaps the foremost thrust of her argument was the exact opposite—a rejection of drawing districts to ensure the election of a maximum number of black elected officials. Instead, she argued the purpose of democracy was to empower the maximum number of voters to elect candidates of their own choosing, regardless of race.




Guinier argued that multi-member districts provided an alternative that could promote an environment in which cross-racial politics could more readily flourish. (Republicans at the time were already starting to exploit the weakness of candidate quota systems, packing minority voters into a handful of Southern districts—most notoriously in North Carolina—in order to deprive white Democratic politicians of black electoral support.) Guinier gave her own account of the ordeal she was put through in her 1998 book, “Lift Every Voice: Turning a Civil Rights Setback Into a New Vision of Social Justice,” in which her focus is on stressing the lessons for organizing that social justice advocates needed to learn. However, it’s also clear that Clinton and his team somehow never recognized the take-no-prisoners mindset of their congressional opponents, never even began to craft an effective response, and worst of all, never even read Guinier’s work, so they had no basis on which to do anything but knee-jerk react to the accusations of others.




In the end, Bill Clinton spent half an hour or so reading through some of what Guinier had written—but only after he’d already decided to abandon her. Even so, it was far too little time to absorb the depth of the arguments she was engaged with. It’s surely true that Bill Clinton is a quick study—but he has rarely been required to study something as deeply challenging as the areas that Guinier explored. His failure to give her the hearing her ideas deserved has impoverished all of us, while giving encouragement to those who have dramatically intensified their attacks on voting rights in the decades since then. There’s a lot there for him to apologize for, not so much about a personal offense as it is about lost opportunities to build a much more robust democratic culture.




Both Cole and Guinier have continued in highly successful careers. Cole continued to head Spelman through 1997, and was president of Bennett College from 2002 to 2007. Since 2009, she’s been Director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, located in Washington, D.C. Guinier moved to Harvard Law in 1998, where she’s taught ever since, though with various high-profile guest appointments. She’s written five books and scores of law review articles. But neither of them has been fully appreciated and integrated into a national public discourse that generally operates substantially below their level of intelligence. Their loss has been the nation’s loss as well.






 

Mask

"OneOfTheBest"
Platinum Member
Is this Hillary gal is the type of person to punch u in the face then tell you," I didn't mean to hit you that hard"
 

ballscout1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Is this Hillary gal is the type of person to punch u in the face then tell you," I didn't mean to hit you that hard"
Nah homey that is the type of person my mother was.

I can remember multiple ass whoopins that she told me shit like

I do this because I love you

This hurts me more than it hurts you

:lol::lol::lol::lol:
 

Watcher

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You have no idea, I give zero fucks about either....Bernice, Billiary, Trump
Obama(just a fan of the person not the job), Bushes or whoever else coming...


Bullshit

I looked through your posts. You post too much...

Only negative posts in politics is all Hillary.
 

Watcher

Rising Star
Platinum Member
Bill Clinton’s gutsy apologies: Now he owes one to Ricky Ray Rector
To look tough on crime, Clinton oversaw execution of a man so mentally ill he asked to save his last meal for later

Because it’s the most painful, I think we should start with the case of Ricky Ray Rector, whose execution Clinton made part of his campaign for president. Rector was no angel. He was a convicted double murderer. In 1981, he killed one man for refusing a friend entry to a night club, and he killed the second—a long-time friend, who was a police officer—when he came at Rector’s request to arrest him. But here’s the twist: Rector also tried to kill himself, immediately after the second murder. Instead, he gave himself a partial lobotomy, leaving himself deeply incapacitated with an IQ of about 70. It left him a completely different, utterly helpless and dependent man.




There had been an earlier case, Ford v. Wainwright, in 1986, in which the Supreme Court held it was unconstitutional to execute the insane. While Rector’s initial lawyers had not been very able, he eventually was represented by lawyers who appealed his case to the Supreme Court, arguing that the same principle should apply to the mentally incompetent as well. The Supreme Court refused to hear the case, but Thurgood Marshall—who wrote the decision in Ford v. Wainwright—took the unusual step of filing a dissent from that refusal, in which he wrote:




The issue in this case is not only unsettled, but is also recurring and important. The stark realities are that many death row inmates were afflicted with serious mental impairments before they committed their crimes and that many more develop such impairments during the excruciating interval between sentencing and execution…. Unavoidably, then, the question whether such persons can be put to death once the deterioration of their faculties has rendered them unable even to appeal to the law or the compassion of the society that has condemned them is central to the administration of the death penalty in this Nation. I would therefore grant the petition for certiorari in order to resolve now the questions left unanswered by our decision in Ford v. Wainwright.




In 2008, after Bill Clinton’s intemperate response to Obama winning the South Carolina primary shocked many in media, Chris Kromm, of the Institute for Southern Studies, looked back at how Ricky Ray Rector’s fate intersected with Bill Clinton in that campaign–one in which no Democrat wanted to face a “Willie Horton ad” like the one that helped destroy Michael Dukakis in 1988:




It was almost exactly this time of year 16 years ago that then-Gov. Bill Clinton, eager to break away from a tight pack of 1992 Democratic primary hopefuls, decided crime would be one his big-ticket issues. Democrats should “no longer feel guilty about protecting the innocent,” he would proclaim from the campaign trail.




How did candidate Clinton choose to show he was “tough on crime?” By flying down to Arkansas, mid-campaign, to personally preside over the execution of Ricky Ray Rector, a mentally retarded African-American man.




It was only the third death sentence carried out in Arkansas since 1973, and Clinton made a point of being on hand for the TV crews when Rector was killed by lethal injection on January 24, 1992.




In 2002, the Supreme Court ruled that executing persons who are mentally retarded is “cruel and unusual punishment.” And in the court of public opinion, many African-Americans judged that Clinton–far from being a “black president”–was in reality another white president who was all too willing to use race when it suited him.




Kromm went on to quote Margaret Kimberley at The Black Commentator:




[R]icky Ray Rector became world famous upon his execution in 1992. Then Governor Bill Clinton left the campaign trail in January of that year to sign the warrant for Rector’s execution. Rector’s mental capacity was such that when taken from his cell as a “dead man walking” he told a guard to save his pie. He thought he would return to finish his dessert.




I try to remember this story when I am told that all Black people love Bill Clinton or that he should be considered the first Black president. Clinton wasn’t Black when Rector needed him. He was just another politician who didn’t want to be labeled soft on crime.




The truth is that Bill Clinton has a complicated history of racial relations, and even some black politicians in his shoes would have done exactly the same thing. But if moving forward wholeheartedly requires us to acknowledge past errors, then Ricky Ray Rector’s execution is one more thing that Clinton should publicly regret.




The next year—his first year as president—Bill Clinton had a rocky relationship with black women when he backed out of two high-profile nominations. The first wasJohnnetta Cole, the first black female president of Spelman College, who headed Clinton’s transition team for education, labor, the arts and humanities, and was slated to be selected as Secretary of Education. Her nomination was squelched after the Jewish Daily Forward reported she’d been a member of the national committee of the Venceremos Brigade, which the always-reliable FBI said was connected to Cuba’s intelligence agencies. Nothing further needed to be said: guilt by association was automatically assumed.




The attack against Lani Guinier was far more extensive, protracted, and baseless. Guinier was a former staff attorney with the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, who had moved from being one of their top attorneys, heading their Voting Rights project, to proving herself a top-flight academic, at the University of Pennsylvania, with a series of sweeping, but well-grounded and sophisticated law review articles (most collected in her first book, “Tyranny of the Majority: Fundamental Fairness in Representative Democracy“), in which she argued for a need to rethink approaches to voting rights law, to avoid what she identified as a number of blind alleys. At the time, Guinier was only the second person ever appointed to head the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division who actually had a background in the relevant law—both as a litigator and an academic. Yet she was shamelessly and ridiculously attacked as a “quota queen” (a blatant echo of the “welfare queen” slur), when perhaps the foremost thrust of her argument was the exact opposite—a rejection of drawing districts to ensure the election of a maximum number of black elected officials. Instead, she argued the purpose of democracy was to empower the maximum number of voters to elect candidates of their own choosing, regardless of race.




Guinier argued that multi-member districts provided an alternative that could promote an environment in which cross-racial politics could more readily flourish. (Republicans at the time were already starting to exploit the weakness of candidate quota systems, packing minority voters into a handful of Southern districts—most notoriously in North Carolina—in order to deprive white Democratic politicians of black electoral support.) Guinier gave her own account of the ordeal she was put through in her 1998 book, “Lift Every Voice: Turning a Civil Rights Setback Into a New Vision of Social Justice,” in which her focus is on stressing the lessons for organizing that social justice advocates needed to learn. However, it’s also clear that Clinton and his team somehow never recognized the take-no-prisoners mindset of their congressional opponents, never even began to craft an effective response, and worst of all, never even read Guinier’s work, so they had no basis on which to do anything but knee-jerk react to the accusations of others.




In the end, Bill Clinton spent half an hour or so reading through some of what Guinier had written—but only after he’d already decided to abandon her. Even so, it was far too little time to absorb the depth of the arguments she was engaged with. It’s surely true that Bill Clinton is a quick study—but he has rarely been required to study something as deeply challenging as the areas that Guinier explored. His failure to give her the hearing her ideas deserved has impoverished all of us, while giving encouragement to those who have dramatically intensified their attacks on voting rights in the decades since then. There’s a lot there for him to apologize for, not so much about a personal offense as it is about lost opportunities to build a much more robust democratic culture.




Both Cole and Guinier have continued in highly successful careers. Cole continued to head Spelman through 1997, and was president of Bennett College from 2002 to 2007. Since 2009, she’s been Director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art, located in Washington, D.C. Guinier moved to Harvard Law in 1998, where she’s taught ever since, though with various high-profile guest appointments. She’s written five books and scores of law review articles. But neither of them has been fully appreciated and integrated into a national public discourse that generally operates substantially below their level of intelligence. Their loss has been the nation’s loss as well.





Good and Bad I agree

Now show me what good Trump has done for Black people.
 

ballscout1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Good and Bad I agree

Now show me what good Trump has done for Black people.
Trump ain't asking for our trust or our vote.

Why you always cross dressing the topics ?

This that type of shit when a cat posts about black youth and then some cat comes in with crakkas do it too.

Now if somebody makes a thread saying trump is good then that shit will be impeached too.

But it isn't a valid to ignore what's critical facts by asking about somebody else..

You were the one posting shit about Hillary and Bill being so positive when it comes to their relations with black people. I posted impeaching information.
 

FLoss

Niga did you get yo "BOO"sah shot?
BGOL Investor
Billary's first order of business will be to murder Farrakhan.

 

Watcher

Rising Star
Platinum Member
Trump ain't asking for our trust or our vote.

Why you always cross dressing the topics ?

This that type of shit when a cat posts about black youth and then some cat comes in with crakkas do it too.

Now if somebody makes a thread saying trump is good then that shit will be impeached too.

But it isn't a valid to ignore what's critical facts by asking about somebody else..

You were the one posting shit about Hillary and Bill being so positive when it comes to their relations with black people. I posted impeaching information.
You have to accept it's Trump or Hillary..
 

ballscout1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
You have to accept it's Trump or Hillary..
that is a fact.

what i don't have to do is like either.

i don't buy the lesser of two evils argument that some use to help them sleep at night.

if both have policy to hurt black people but one is good for fags and illegals and the handicapped and the Asians.

they both are still bad for black people.
 

Mask

"OneOfTheBest"
Platinum Member
that is a fact.

what i don't have to do is like either.

i don't buy the lesser of two evils argument that some use to help them sleep at night.

if both have policy to hurt black people but one is good for fags and illegals and the handicapped and the Asians.

they both are still bad for black people.

This man it's like this, whenever have more faithfuls throughout others will win, I know many folks like man fuck both of them...I ain't going Vote.

I've heard a few talks about the risk of Trump fucking with Obamacare....
 

ballscout1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
This man it's like this, whenever have more faithfuls throughout others will win, I know many folks like man fuck both of them...I ain't going Vote.

I've heard a few talks about the risk of Trump fucking with Obamacare....
trump can't do anything with Obamacare...Obamacare is the law of the land.

Only congress or the courts can do anything with it. And neither wants to because the insurance companies are making more money and so is the pharmaceutical companies. The same people giving them millions.

not voting for Hillary or Trump doesn't mean not voting for congress or state and local.

Neither the GOP or the Democrats are getting rid of Obamacare because it is working and their people like it.

There was just ad article saying more and more GOP like Obamacare just don't call it that.

not for nothing Trump been saying the trade agreements are fucking up jobs which we know because US steel is almost nonexistent. Look at Chicago, Pittsburgh and other places that lost because of the steel industry tanking for Chinese steel.
 

ballscout1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
so ok...

what the F*CK we gonna do IF Trump actually wins though?
the same thing we did when Nixon, Carter, Reagan, Clinton, Bush 1&2 and Obama were elected.

stay black in AmeriKKa.

we just won't have as many feel good moments as we have the last 8 years with a black man as president and a black family in the white house
 

Watcher

Rising Star
Platinum Member
the same thing we did when Nixon, Carter, Reagan, Clinton, Bush 1&2 and Obama were elected.

stay black in AmeriKKa.

we just won't have as many feel good moments as we have the last 8 years with a black man as president and a black family in the white house
Such Bullshit

We are still paying for George W. Bush to this day.

Everything positive gained with Obama will be gone. It will take 30+ years to recover from Trump.

And seriously fuck you for always deflecting for republicans...

Trump and the republicans controlling all congress won't do anything to Obamacare huh....fuck you and that bullshit.
 
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