Over 100,000 Movies ❤ 420,00 Scenes with Previews ❤ Try it for $2.99

RIP - BREAKING: Beloved Bahamian actor and former ambassador Sir Sidney Poitier has died.

godofwine

Supreme Porn Poster - Ret
BGOL Investor
Listening to the dialogue of Uptown Saturday night in the beginning, Sidney Poitier is talking to his wife Lee Chamberlain. He told her that she had the best behind he'd ever seen

Lee Chamberlain: don't you men ever think of anything besides behinds?

Sidney Poitier: Legs and boobs, but mostly behinds

:giggle:

You know, after 20 years of marriage two kids and three jobs you know...you still got the biggest butt I ever saw

You're my queen, Sarah.



He wasn't lying. Black men and butts. It didn't change much

Most of my childhood icons are gone. What they left behind a wealth of Cinema, particularly those directed by Sidney Poitier

Buck and the preacher
A warm December ( I will be watching this one tomorrow)
Uptown Saturday Night
Let's do it again
A piece of the action

I am 44 years old with tears in my eyes right now :giggle:
 
Last edited:

slam

aka * My Name Is Not $lam *
Super Moderator
RIP.

I’ll always remember him for some of the best 70s Blaxploitation movies made.






it`s crazy how he flipped it ....he wasnt known for comedy but killed these 3 movies ...

crazy shit i dont even remember him like talking about for all his dramatic roles.. this shit i remember him from ...
:lol:

big big loss...

like i said before as we get older man we gonna b losing a lot of ICON`s ...:smh::(
 
Last edited:

godofwine

Supreme Porn Poster - Ret
BGOL Investor
tht must have been a funny ass joke ..lol..i wanna hear it ...

u can tell him n Harry was real close ... :yes:

RIP..

a movie nobody ever mentions tht i really liked was The Jackal ...

he was older n wasnt the lead actor but i liked him in it ...
I just downloaded a better quality copy of the jackal. I haven't seen it in years. I'm going to watch it again after I check out A Warm December, (1973) which he starred and directed
 

Tdot_firestarta

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Rest in Power to one the greatest and most iconic actors in history. I remember watching all his classics in my youth and the respect and reverence my elders had for him. I copped DVDs of uptown saturday night, a piece of the action, and let's do it again a few years ago...gonna watch them over the weekend and carry on tradition with my seeds when they come into this world.

I also love the way he went at cac's necks and went hard in the paint for our people.
in "heat of the night" it was written for him just to take the slap. he had them re-write it so he would slap the CAC back and also stipulated that he wouldn't do the film If they didnt change it or if they would cut the scene out in the south.

theres another video of him taking some CAC reporters to task for trying to get him to talk shit about H rap Brown and the panthers, and only focusing on questions about his blackness etc.

 

playahaitian

Rising Star
Certified Pussy Poster
Quincy Jones Remembers Sidney Poitier: ‘I Will Miss You Forever My Dear Brother’
By Jennifer Zhan



Photo: Mark Von Holden/Getty Images

Music legend Quincy Jones has paid tribute to trailblazing actor and activist Sidney Poitier in a lengthy remembrance on Twitter. “We were joined at the hip from our times scraping to get by, coming up in New York in the 50’s, to achieving all of our dreams & working together in Hollywood,” Jones wrote, “to standing up to use our voices in support of the things that truly mattered.” According to Jones, Poitier possessed a quality of “regalness” that surpassed ruling members of royalty. The pair of longtime friends remained close throughout their rise to prominence in the film and TV industry. Beginning with the 1965 thriller The Slender Thread, Jones composed and arranged music for several movies starring Poitier, including the Oscar-winning In The Heat of The Night. In 1996, Poitier presented the Best Picture category at the Jones-produced 68th Academy Awards ceremony. “Through thick & thin we shared the highest peaks & the lowest valleys of life together,” Jones tweeted. “I will miss you forever my dear brother…& when I feel like my soul needs to smile, I will think of you & our decades of memories shared together.” Read his full tribute below.






 

godofwine

Supreme Porn Poster - Ret
BGOL Investor
Rest in Power to one the greatest and most iconic actors in history. I remember watching all his classics in my youth and the respect and reverence my elders had for him. I copped DVDs of uptown saturday night, a piece of the action, and let's do it again a few years ago...gonna watch them over the weekend and carry on tradition with my seeds when they come into this world.

I also love the way he went at cac's necks and went hard in the paint for our people.
in "heat of the night" it was written for him just to take the slap. he had them re-write it so he would slap the CAC back and also stipulated that he wouldn't do the film If they didnt change it or if they would cut the scene out in the south.

theres another video of him taking some CAC reporters to task for trying to get him to talk shit about H rap Brown and the panthers, and only focusing on questions about his blackness etc.

Thank you. Very well put and the video was spot-on

Sidney Poitier did more for black people than we even know. I'm watching a movie now, a Warm December, a 1973 movie directed by Sidney Poitier

This is quite possibly the first movie ever about sickle cell anemia, it is he's that only affects black people


 

JazzyBenz

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Sir Sidney was my dude....his footprints on film is impeccable there wasn't too many films I didn't care for, if any at all....but my favorites are with he and Bill Cosby; Let's Do It Again actually but his range showed up on all the others....great actor...rest easy sir
 

godofwine

Supreme Porn Poster - Ret
BGOL Investor
This was why In the Heat of the Night was not filmed in Sparta Mississippi but instead in Sparta Illinois

**


Sidney realized that he was working with someone who was a very talented actor, but before we shot he had a problem [with shooting in the South].

Early on, Sidney also had asked, “Where are you going to shoot this picture?” And I said, “Well, I’ve got scenes in cotton-picking fields, I’ve got scenes that are located in the southern United States. All my films, I try to make them believable, and the first thing I have to do is find a believable location.” And he said, “Well, I’m not going south of the Mason-Dixon line.” And he said it with such emphasis that I realized it was very important to him. I said, “Why is that?” And he says, “I had an unsettling experience with Harry Belafonte in Georgia, where our car was chased and we were threatened, and I don’t want to go down there.” So I said, “I’ll do my best to stay north of the Mason-Dixon line. What can I say? I want you to do the picture.”

I didn’t want to make it a deal-breaker, so I started location-hunting, and I went to southern Illinois, and there’s a place where it dips down and it’s on the Mississippi River just across the state line from Missouri, a place called Sparta. I can remember my production designer saying, “Jesus, look at these water towers! They’ve got ‘Sparta’ written all over them. It’s got the Sparta Farm Machine Co. Boy, it’s gonna be a job to try and paint all of these over [with the name of the town in the book].” And I said, “We’ll just make it Sparta, Mississippi. And that solves that problem.” So that’s what we did. And we used that town as our main set piece.

After we’d been shooting for two or three weeks, I said to Sidney, “I’ve got to ask you a personal favor. I cannot find a cotton plantation north of the Mason-Dixon line, but I found a location in Dyersburg, Tennessee. And I’ve got everything there: I’ve got the cotton plantation, I’ve got the Southern ranch that Endicott [one of the characters, played by Larry Gates] lives in, and if we isolate the two scenes that we need, I can shoot in a couple of days. So I’m asking you, if you wouldn’t mind, if we can move the location to the South, just for two days, just for the weekend.”

I remember pleading with him, and Sidney said, “I understand, I understand.” He realized we were up against the gun and the picture was going well. I said, “Don’t worry. We’ll protect you. You’re not going to be out there alone with a lot of protestors.” I tried to explain that he would be surrounded by a very loyal crew — and we had some big guys on that crew. So he agreed to go south, and we went for two days. We were forced to stay in the Holiday Inn because it was the only place that accepted African-American people; the main hotel in Dyersburg was a real Southern hotel and it was whites only. You’ve got to remember, we were shooting in 1966, so things were a little uptight. Martin Luther King Jr. had just done the march on Selma.
 

slam

aka * My Name Is Not $lam *
Super Moderator
This was why In the Heat of the Night was not filmed in Sparta Mississippi but instead in Sparta Illinois

**


Sidney realized that he was working with someone who was a very talented actor, but before we shot he had a problem [with shooting in the South].

Early on, Sidney also had asked, “Where are you going to shoot this picture?” And I said, “Well, I’ve got scenes in cotton-picking fields, I’ve got scenes that are located in the southern United States. All my films, I try to make them believable, and the first thing I have to do is find a believable location.” And he said, “Well, I’m not going south of the Mason-Dixon line.” And he said it with such emphasis that I realized it was very important to him. I said, “Why is that?” And he says, “I had an unsettling experience with Harry Belafonte in Georgia, where our car was chased and we were threatened, and I don’t want to go down there.” So I said, “I’ll do my best to stay north of the Mason-Dixon line. What can I say? I want you to do the picture.”

I didn’t want to make it a deal-breaker, so I started location-hunting, and I went to southern Illinois, and there’s a place where it dips down and it’s on the Mississippi River just across the state line from Missouri, a place called Sparta. I can remember my production designer saying, “Jesus, look at these water towers! They’ve got ‘Sparta’ written all over them. It’s got the Sparta Farm Machine Co. Boy, it’s gonna be a job to try and paint all of these over [with the name of the town in the book].” And I said, “We’ll just make it Sparta, Mississippi. And that solves that problem.” So that’s what we did. And we used that town as our main set piece.

After we’d been shooting for two or three weeks, I said to Sidney, “I’ve got to ask you a personal favor. I cannot find a cotton plantation north of the Mason-Dixon line, but I found a location in Dyersburg, Tennessee. And I’ve got everything there: I’ve got the cotton plantation, I’ve got the Southern ranch that Endicott [one of the characters, played by Larry Gates] lives in, and if we isolate the two scenes that we need, I can shoot in a couple of days. So I’m asking you, if you wouldn’t mind, if we can move the location to the South, just for two days, just for the weekend.”

I remember pleading with him, and Sidney said, “I understand, I understand.” He realized we were up against the gun and the picture was going well. I said, “Don’t worry. We’ll protect you. You’re not going to be out there alone with a lot of protestors.” I tried to explain that he would be surrounded by a very loyal crew — and we had some big guys on that crew. So he agreed to go south, and we went for two days. We were forced to stay in the Holiday Inn because it was the only place that accepted African-American people; the main hotel in Dyersburg was a real Southern hotel and it was whites only. You’ve got to remember, we were shooting in 1966, so things were a little uptight. Martin Luther King Jr. had just done the march on Selma.


dam shame ...

n white people today got some nerve to try n down play racism like they aint put us thru hell

n continue to do so on the low n sometimes dead in our face ...:hmm:
 
Over 100,000 Movies ❤ 420,00 Scenes with Previews ❤ Try it for $2.99
Top