Killed by the Cops

QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
4 Minneapolis cops fired after video shows one kneeling on neck of black man who later died


CNN
By Ray Sanchez,
Joe Sutton and
Artemis Moshtaghian
Tuesday, May 26, 2020


(CNN)Four Minneapolis police officers have been fired for their involvement in the death of a black man who was held down with a knee as he protested that he couldn't breathe, officials said Tuesday.

The FBI is investigating the incident, which drew widespread condemnation of the officers after a video showing part of the encounter circulated on social media.

Mayor Jacob Frey said the technique used to pin George Floyd's head to the ground was against department regulations.
After several minutes of pleading with an officer pressing a knee to the back of his neck, the man appeared motionless, his eyes shut, his head against the pavement.

Officers responding to an alleged forgery in progress Monday evening were initially told that a person later described as the suspect was sitting on a car and appeared to be under the influence, police said.

A pair of officers located the man, who was at that point inside the car and who police said "physically resisted" the officers when ordered to get out. Officers handcuffed the man, who "appeared to be suffering medical distress," according to police. He died at a hospital a short time later, police said.

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey called the firing of the officers "the right decision for our city."
The four officers were "separated from employment," Officer Garrett Parten, a police spokesman, said Tuesday.
"I support your decisions, one hundred percent," Frey, in a statement, said of police Chief Medaria Arradondo's firing of the officers. "It is the right decision for our city. The right decision for our community, it is the right decision for the Minneapolis Police Department."
Frey, speaking later during a town hall streamed on Facebook, said the officer had no reason to employ the hold on the man's neck.
"The technique that was used is not permitted; is not a technique that our officers get trained in on," he said. "And our chief has been very clear on that piece. There is no reason to apply that kind of pressure with a knee to someone's neck."
The video shows two officers by the man on the ground -- one of them with his knee over the back of the man's neck. The video did not capture what led up to the arrest or what police described as the man resisting arrest.
"Please, I can't breathe," the man said, screaming for several minutes before he became silent. Bystanders urged the officer to release the man from his hold.
Civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, in a statement, identified the man as Floyd and said he was representing his family. The mayor also identified him on Twitter.
"We all watched the horrific death of George Floyd on video as witnesses begged the police officer to take him into the police car and get off his neck," Crump said. "This abusive, excessive and inhumane use of force cost the life of a man who was being detained by the police for questioning about a non-violent charge."
Floyd's cause and manner of death remains pending and is being investigated by local, state and federal law enforcement, the Hennepin County Medical Examiner's Office said in a statement.
News footage showed small clusters of protesters waving signs and chanting "No justice, no peace" outside a Minneapolis police precinct Tuesday afternoon. Some motorists honked in support.
Another protest was planned near a makeshift memorial to Floyd at the scene of the incident Tuesday night, CNN affiliate WCCO TV reported. It was being organized by local activists groups, including the Minneapolis NAACP.
Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar via Twitter called the incident "yet another horrifying and gutwrenching instance of an African American man dying."

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Frey on Tuesday offered his condolences to the man's family, adding that "what we saw was horrible, completely and utterly messed up."
"For five minutes, we watched as a white officer pressed his knee to the neck of a black man," Frey told reporters.

"When you hear someone calling for help, you are supposed to help. This officer failed in the most basic human sense. What happened on Chicago and 38th this last night is simply awful. It was traumatic and it serves as a clear reminder of just how far we have to go."

"Being black in America," Frey said, should not be "a death sentence."

The Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis said in a statement the officers were cooperating in the investigation.

"Now is not the time rush to (judgment) and immediately condemn our officers," the statement said. "Officers' actions and training protocol will be carefully examined after the officers have provided their statements."

In a Facebook video posted Monday, bystanders urged the officer to get off the man. Two officers handled the man on the ground while another stood nearby with his eyes on the bystanders as traffic passed in the background.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo says the officers involved have been placed on leave.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo says the officers involved have been placed on leave.


"My stomach hurts," the man told the officer. "My neck hurts. Everything hurts."

At one point the man said, "Give me some water or something. Please. Please."

"His nose is bleeding," a woman said of the man.

"He's not even resisting arrest," one man said. "He's not responding right now, bro."

Frey said he understood the anger in the community but reminded potential protesters that "there is another danger out there right now which is Covid-19."

"We need to make sure that everyone that is protesting and that is voicing their opinion stays safe and their families are protected as well," he said. "So please, practice safe distancing, please use a mask."

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz tweeted Tuesday, "The lack of humanity in this disturbing video is sickening. We will get answers and seek justice."
St. Paul, Minnesota, Mayor Melvin Carter called the video of the incident "one of the most vile and heartbreaking images I've ever seen."
"The officer who stood guard is just as responsible as his partner; both must be held fully accountable," Carter tweeted. "This must stop now."
Paige Fernandez, policing policy adviser for the ACLU, said the incident recalled the 2014 New York death of Eric Garner, who repeated "I can't breathe" several times after a police officer held him in a chokehold. Garner died during the arrest, the incident also caught on video.

"Even in places like Minneapolis, where chokeholds are technically banned, Black people are targeted by the police for low-level offenses and are subjected to unreasonable, unnecessary violence," Fernandez said in a statement. "Make no mistake: George Floyd should be alive today. The officers responsible must be held accountable."

The Hennepin County Attorney's office said in a statement Tuesday that the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Bureau of Criminal Apprehension was investigating, along with the FBI. There was no immediate response from the FBI.

The county medical examiner will identify the victim once a preliminary autopsy has been done, authorities said.

Body worn cameras were activated during the incident, police said.

CNN's Chris Boyette, Josh Campbell and Brad Parks contributed to this report.





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COINTELPRO

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Why are people crying about the need to charge the police officers? First you need to distance him from the other police that are still working through time. It is a common tactic that is used in corporate america and the government. I have personally seen this tactic applied to me, and knew shit was going down.

Many police develop strong bonds and will fight back if they see one of their own being attacked. He does not pose a danger to the community since his police powers have been taken away versus the Ahmaud Arbery case. He is losing everything, such as his pension.

They also might be planting undercovers in the department to get incriminating statements, charging people will undermine this investigation.
 
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COINTELPRO

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
There is always some self hating swirling desperate immigrant politician around when something tragic happens to us. After escaping their country, they get the DNC backing and run for office; fuck supporting #ADOS candidates for office, just let a swirling foreigner come in barely naturalized as a citizen.














Florida







Georgia





President Obama is the Anti-Christ, wherever he shows up, we suffer with our necks broken or shot trying to escape the KKK. The same place Trayvon Martin was murdered, he decides to campaign while racially mocking us. He has planted other self hating, swirling immigrants into other congressional districts through his control of the DNC.

What is next, the NY police beheading somebody in AOC district while being filmed?





Offspring of jewish immigrants from Austria and Russia, the only Democrat representative in the state.
 
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COINTELPRO

Rising Star
BGOL Investor




Kaepernick is biracial who was abandoned and raised by white foster parents, as you can see from Doja Cat who was in deep convo with white supremacists. I suspected his 'protest' was some sort of racial mockery of us linked to the Dylan Roof mass shootings. Here you can see this same PR tactic that was used by Elon Musk, a foreigner of having #ADOS traitor (Lebron James) validating him first, than he post his tweet message about George Floyd.

 
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QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
Breonna Taylor Is One of a Shocking Number of Black People to See Armed Police Barge Into Their Homes


No-knock and quick-knock drug searches surged—from
around 3,000 in 1981 to at least 60,000 annually in recent years.

Tens of thousands more could be targeted in drug raids this year.




Breonna Taylor. Taylor family photo


In mid-March, police officers barged into Breonna Taylor’s home in Louisville, Kentucky, in the middle of the night and discharged a spray of bullets that struck and killed the 26-year-old EMT. More than two months later, leaders in her city are taking steps to make it harder for officers to enter homes without knocking.

On Monday, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced that the police chief will now have to sign off on all no-knock warrants, the type of search warrant officers obtained to enter Taylor’s home as part of a drug investigation. But it’s unlikely Taylor will be the last Black woman to lose her life as a result of these warrants: Research shows that Black and Latino people have long been disproportionately affected by these kinds of raids, and tens of thousands more will likely be targeted within the year.

“They don’t do this in other neighborhoods,” Benjamin Crump, a civil rights attorney representing Taylor’s family, said in a press call last week. Crump has also represented the families of other Black shooting victims around the country, including Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Ahmaud Arbery. “If this was another household in a more affluent community, lightning would strike and thunder would groan” if such a warrant were issued, Crump said.

Taylor, 26, and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were in bed when they heard the officers enter at around 12:40 a.m. on March 13. According to the search warrant, police believed a suspected drug dealer named Jamarcus Glover—who did not live with Taylor and had already been arrested elsewhere—was keeping drugs or money at her house.

Walker, thinking the plain-clothes officers were intruders, called 911. He then pulled out his gun and fired a shot at one officer’s leg. The officers responded with more than 20 rounds of bullets that sailed through the kitchen and living room, fatally striking Taylor eight times. Bullets also flew into an adjacent home, where a pregnant woman and a five-year-old child slept. The officers found no drugs on the premises. They promptly charged Walker with attempted murder.

Walker was a legally registered gun owner, and Kentucky’s Stand Your Ground law allows people to use deadly force against an intruder at home. But the law doesn’t apply when the intruder is a police officer who identifies himself as such. The Louisville officers claim that even with their no-knock warrant, they knocked and announced themselves before forcibly entering Taylor’s home. According to lawyers for her family, neighbors say they heard no knock.

Neither Taylor nor her boyfriend had a criminal record for drugs or violence, the lawyers say. In a lawsuit filed in late April, they accuse the police of negligence, excessive force, and wrongful death. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear last week described reports of the killing as “troubling” and called for an investigation. Responding to Taylor’s death, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul told the Courier-Journal he thought no-knock warrants should be forbidden.

Historically, police officers executing a warrant were supposed to knock, announce themselves, and wait before entering a person’s home. But in the 1970s and ’80s, as the war on drugs ramped up, many officers argued that drug dealers would take advantage of the warning to destroy evidence or arm themselves. Judges began approving more no-knock warrants, along with “quick-knock” warrants, another type that requires officers to knock but allows them to barge inside seconds later. Around the country, no-knock and quick-knock drug searches surged—from around 3,000 in 1981 to at least 60,000 annually in recent years, according to Peter Kraska, a professor at Eastern Kentucky University who studies these raids. In many cities, it’s rare for a judge to deny an officer’s request for a no-knock warrant, partly because it’s easy to argue a suspect will be dangerous when you consider that 4 in 10 American adults live in a home with a gun.

As the number of raids increased, so did the toll on Black families. “The war on drugs has always been predominantly prosecuted against minority communities, so the bulk of no-knock raids are executed against those same people,” says Kraska.


Black people and Latinos
accounted for 61 percent
of the people targeted by
SWAT drug raids
The officers who killed Taylor wore plain clothes. Usually, no-knock raids are carried out by trained SWAT or drug tactical teams with military-grade gear. In 2014, researchers at the ACLU studied more than 800 SWAT raids by law enforcement around the country. In total, they found that 42 percent of people affected by search-warrant raids were Black, and 12 percent were Latino. Nearly two-thirds of the raids were drug searches. Taken together, Black people and Latinos accounted for 61 percent of the people targeted by SWAT drug raids. And SWAT teams found contraband in only about a third of these cases, meaning that many innocent people were raided unnecessarily.


Others were killed or injured:
In 2008, SWAT officers opened fire into the home of Tarika Wilson in Lima, Ohio. They were hunting for Wilson’s boyfriend, a suspected drug dealer, but instead they fatally shot Wilson, who was cradling her 14-month-old son. (Bullets hit the baby in the left shoulder and hand, but he survived.)​
In 2014, Georgia police threw a grenade into the crib of a 19-month-old toddler during a SWAT raid, burning the boy so badly he was placed into a medically induced coma; the officers, who said they hadn’t realized there were children in the home, were not charged.​
In 2010, as portrayed in this Mother Jones investigation, Detroit police who entered the wrong apartment during a no-knock raid and killed 7-year-old Aiyana Stanley-Jones as she slept on the couch.​
Between 2010 and 2016, at least 81 civilians and 13 officers died in forcible-entry SWAT raids around the country, according to a New York Times report. And Kraska, the professor, has documented about 330 no-knock or quick-knock raids in the past two decades that led to a killing or serious injury. “This is such an extreme, inherently risky, and violent approach,” he says. “It doesn’t make any sense to use this highly militarized approach for potential low-level drug possession or low-level dealing.”​

While the Louisville police department will now require the police chief’s sign-off on no-knock raids, Kraska worries it’s a “pretty meaningless attempt at reform” because it’s contingent on the chief’s sensibilities. “If you have a progressive police chief who is concerned about citizens’ wellbeing, that’s a good idea,” he says, “but if you have a chief who thinks [raids] are the best way to fight the drug war, you could have a complete mess.”

Mayor Fischer acknowledged that the policy change was just a first step. “We know there needs to be more conversation on the use of these warrants,” he said Monday. (Quick-knock warrants will still be allowed without the police chief’s approval.) He added that the police department would expand its use of body cameras, which had not been worn by the officers who killed Taylor.

It may not have been the kind of justice Taylor’s mom, Tamika Palmer, imagined for her daughter. “I want them to say her name,” Palmer said in a recent interview with the Washington Post. Palmer says Taylor was scheduled to work a hospital shift the morning after she was shot. “There’s no reason Breonna should be dead at all.”




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QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
4 Minneapolis cops fired after video shows one kneeling on neck of black man who later died

4 Minneapolis cops CHARGED

Attorney General Keith Ellison upgraded charges against officer who knelt on George Floyd's neck; charged other 3 involved




STAR TRIBUNE
By STEPHEN MONTEMAYOR
AND CHAO XIONG
June 04, 2020 - 8:49 AM

Attorney General Keith Ellison’s office on Wednesday upgraded charges against the former Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck and charged the other three officers at the scene with aiding and abetting murder.

The decision came just two days after Ellison took over the prosecution from Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman and followed more than a week of sometimes-violent protests calling for tougher charges against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who had pinned Floyd to the ground and held him there for nearly nine minutes. Protesters also demanded the arrests of the three other former officers who were present but failed to intervene. All three were booked into the Hennepin County jail on Wednesday.


“To the Floyd family, to our beloved community, and everyone that is watching, I say: George Floyd mattered. He was loved. His life was important. His life had value. We will seek justice for him and for you and we will find it,” Ellison said

However, he said, he doesn’t believe that “one successful prosecution can rectify the hurt and loss that so many people feel. The solution to that pain will be in the slow and difficult work of constructing justice and fairness in our society.”

Chauvin, who was recorded on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck as he begged for air on Memorial Day, now faces the more serious charge of second-degree murder, in addition to the original charges of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter with culpable negligence.

Chauvin was originally charged by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office last week.

The amended complaint filed against Chauvin stated, “Police are trained that this type of restraint with a subject in a prone position is inherently dangerous. … Officer Chauvin’s restraint of Mr. Floyd in this manner for a prolonged period was a substantial factor in Mr. Floyd losing consciousness, constituting substantial bodily harm, and Mr. Floyd’s death as well.”

Don Lewis, special prosecutor in the case against Jeronimo Yanez, the former St. Anthony police officer who killed Philando Castile in 2016, said the nearly nine-minute recording of the moments before Floyd died showed ample evidence of intent to kill on Chauvin’s part.

“Those are moments to cause reflection on whether or not you’re in the middle of a wrongful death here,” Lewis said. “You have George Floyd begging for his life, right? ‘I can’t breathe.’ This is a moment of potential reflection on Chauvin’s part,” Lewis said. “He had multiple opportunities to change course here and decided not to over the span of almost 10 minutes.”


The other officers at the scene — Tou Thao, J Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane — were each charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder while committing a felony, and with aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter with culpable negligence. Both charges are categorized as “unintentional” felonies.

Thao was recorded watching as Chauvin continued to press on Floyd’s neck with his knee. Kueng was one of the first officers on the scene and helped pin Floyd down. Lane was detailed in earlier charges as pointing a gun at Floyd before handcuffing, and he later asked whether officers should roll Floyd on his side as he was restrained.

The charges come just days after Gov. Tim Walz asked Ellison to take over the prosecution, which until Sunday had been led by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office. Freeman stood next to Ellison as the attorney general announced the charges Wednesday, but he did not speak and left midway through the news conference.

Despite the quick pace of adding charges to the investigation, Ellison sought to manage expectations, cautioning that the cases could take “months” to see through. He also brushed off the idea that intense public pressure influenced the process.

The charges noted that Floyd was “calm” after he was first arrested and before Chauvin knelt on his neck. The complaint also noted three times that after Floyd was pinned to the pavement by three officers, none of them moved from their positions despite pleas from Floyd. Video of the incident showed that bystanders also pleaded with police.

Floyd had told the first two officers at the scene — Lane and Kueng — that he was not resisting arrest but did not want to get into the back of their squad car because he is claustrophobic, the charges said.

Walz issued a statement after Ellison announced the new charges. “I laid flowers at George Floyd’s memorial this morning. As a former high school history teacher, I looked up at the mural of George’s face painted above and I reflected on what his death will mean for future generations. What will our young people learn about this moment? Will his death be just another blip in a textbook? Or will it go down in history as when our country turned toward justice and change?

“It’s on each of us to determine that answer,” Walz said. “The charges announced by Attorney General Keith Ellison today are a meaningful step toward justice for George Floyd. But we must also recognize that the anguish driving protests around the world is about more than one tragic incident.

“George Floyd’s death is the symptom of a disease. We will not wake up one day and have the disease of systemic racism cured for us. This is on each of us to solve together, and we have hard work ahead,” he said. “We owe that much to George Floyd, and we owe that much to each other.”

One of the attorneys representing Floyd’s family, Benjamin Crump, released a statement Wednesday praising the arrest and charging of the other three officers and the upgrading of murder charges against Chauvin. Crump’s statement came after the Star Tribune first reported the charges and before Ellison’s office made any official announcements.


“This is a bittersweet moment for the family of George Floyd,” said the joint statement by Floyd’s family, Crump and the legal team. “We are deeply gratified that Attorney General Keith Ellison took decisive action in this case, arresting and charging all the officers involved in George Floyd’s death and upgrading the charge against Derek Chauvin to felony second-degree murder.”

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey also released a statement in support of the new charges.

“That George Floyd’s plea — that his struggle to survive — went unrecognized and unaided by not just one but four officers will live forever as the most chilling moments in our city’s history,” Frey said. “Failing to act amounted to a failure to recognize George’s humanity.”

Attorney Eric Nelson, who is representing Chauvin, declined to comment. Chauvin remains in custody at the state prison in Oak Park Heights.

Kueng’s attorney, Thomas Plunkett, released a statement Wednesday stating that his client was asked at 1:20 p.m. to turn himself in; he is being held at the Hennepin County jail. Plunkett, who represented former Minneapolis officer Mohamed Noor when he was tried and convicted in 2019 for fatally shooting Justine Ruszczyk Damond, declined further comment.

Attorney Earl Gray, who is representing Lane, also declined to comment. Gray represented Yanez when he was tried and acquitted in 2017 for fatally shooting Castile.

Thao’s attorney, Robert Paule, could not be reached for comment.


Floyd’s family and Crump, their lawyer, called the new charges “a significant step forward on the road to justice, and we are gratified that this important action was brought before George Floyd’s body was laid to rest … That is a source of peace for George’s family in this painful time.”

They urged Ellison to continue the investigation and upgrade the charges to first-degree murder, which carries a potential life sentence.

First-degree murder requires proof of planning out the crime. Second-degree unintentional murder carries a maximum sentence of 40 years. Murder in the third degree has a maximum 25-year sentence. Charges of aiding and abetting carry the same maximum penalties as the underlying crime.

“These officers knew they could act with impunity, given the Minneapolis Police Department’s widespread and prolonged pattern and practice of violating people’s constitutional rights,” the family’s statement said. “Therefore, we also demand permanent transparent police accountability at all levels and at all times.”

The family thanked the “outpouring” of support it has received, which manifested in days of huge protests across the country and world.

“Our message to them: Find constructive and positive ways to keep the focus and pressure on,” they said. “Don’t let up on your demand for change.”

The former officers’ prosecution is the quickest in Minnesota history against officers on the job who have killed civilians, and is the first time more than one officer involved in such an incident has been criminally charged. Three officers have previously been charged with killing a civilian on the job; Noor was convicted at trial while two were acquitted.




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QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
Another Man Who Said ‘I Can’t Breathe’
Has Died in Custody.
An Autopsy Calls It Homicide.



Manuel Ellis of Tacoma, Wash., died in part as a result of how he was restrained, according to the medical examiner, who concluded that his death was a homicide.


A photo of Manuel Ellis, a black man who called out “I can’t breathe” before dying in police custody in Tacoma, Wash.

A photo of Manuel Ellis, a black man who called out “I can’t breathe” before dying
in police custody in Tacoma, Wash. Credit: Ruth Fremson/The New York Times


The New York Times
By Mike Baker
Published June 3, 2020
Updated June 5, 2020


SEATTLE — A black man who called out “I can’t breathe” before dying in police custody in Tacoma, Wash., was killed as a result of oxygen deprivation and the physical restraint that was used on him, according to details of a medical examiner’s report released on Wednesday.

The Pierce County Medical Examiner’s Office concluded that the death of the man, Manuel Ellis, 33, was a homicide. Investigators with the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department were in the process of preparing a report about the March death, which occurred shortly after an arrest by officers from the Tacoma Police Department, said the sheriff’s spokesman, Ed Troyer.


“The information is all being put together,” Detective Troyer said. “We expect to present it to the prosecutor at the end of this week or early next week.”

Mr. Ellis’s sister, Monet Carter-Mixon, called for action to bring accountability in the death and further scrutiny of both the Police Department’s practices and how the investigation into his death has been handled.

“There’s a lot of questions that still need to be answered,” Ms. Carter-Mixon said.

Mr. Ellis died from respiratory arrest, hypoxia and physical restraint, according to the medical examiner’s office. The report listed methamphetamine intoxication and heart disease as contributing factors.

Police officers encountered Mr. Ellis, a musician and father of two from Tacoma, on the night of March 3 as they were stopped at an intersection. They saw him banging on the window of another vehicle, Detective Troyer said.

Mr. Ellis approached the officers, Detective Troyer said, and then threw an officer to the ground when the officer got out of the vehicle. The two officers and two backup officers “Mr. Ellis was physically restrained as he continued to be combative,” the Tacoma Police Department said in a statement on Wednesday. who joined — two of them white, one black and one Asian — handcuffed him.

“Mr. Ellis was physically restrained as he continued to be combative,” the Tacoma Police Department said in a statement on Wednesday.

Detective Troyer said he did not know all the details of the restraint the officers used — they were not wearing body cameras — but said he did not believe they used a chokehold or a knee on Mr. Ellis’s neck. They rolled him on his side after he called out, “I can’t breathe.”

“The main reason why he was restrained was so he wouldn’t hurt himself or them,” Detective Troyer said. “As soon as he said he couldn’t breathe, they requested medical aid.”

Detective Troyer said the call for aid came four minutes after the officers encountered Mr. Ellis.

Mr. Ellis was still breathing when medical personnel arrived, Detective Troyer said. He was removed from handcuffs while personnel worked on him for about 40 minutes, Detective Troyer said. He was then pronounced dead.

Family members said Mr. Ellis was the father of an 11-year-old son and 18-month-old daughter. He was a talented musician at his church. Ms. Carter-Mixon said Mr. Ellis was like a father figure to her boys, coaching them on things like how handle themselves to keep safe in a world of racial injustices.

Marcia Carter-Patterson, center, Mr. Ellis’s mother, addressed a vigil for him in Tacoma, Wash., on Wednesday.

Marcia Carter-Patterson, center, Mr. Ellis’s mother, addressed a vigil for him in Tacoma,
Wash., on Wednesday. Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times


“My heart literally hurts,” she said. “It’s painful. My brother was my best friend.”

On Wednesday night, she and others held a vigil in Tacoma.

Brian Giordano, a close friend of Mr. Ellis, said that the two usually spoke several times a day and that Mr. Ellis had video-chatted with him two hours before his death. He had been excited about a church service he had attended and proud of how he had played drums during the service, Mr. Giordano recalled.

He said it would be uncharacteristic of Mr. Ellis to act in the violent way described by the police.


He was living in a clean-and-sober house and was getting his life back together, he said. “He was always uplifting,” Mr. Giordano said. “He was always on the up-and-up about taking care of people.”

The death comes as protests have spread around the nation over the case of George Floyd, a black man who died in the custody of Minneapolis police last week. Minnesota officials have charged all four officers in that case, including Derek Chauvin, who kept his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes during the arrest.

Forensics experts who conducted a private autopsy for Mr. Floyd’s family concluded that another officer’s knees on Mr. Floyd’s back contributed to making it impossible for his lungs to take in sufficient air.

Mayor Victoria Woodards of Tacoma said on Wednesday that she would take appropriate steps based on the findings of the sheriff’s investigation.

“We will learn the results of that investigation even as our country reels from the recent killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and too many others,” Ms. Woodards said.

Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington said the issue was a top priority for him.

“We will be pushing to make sure there is a full and complete investigation of that incident,” Mr. Inslee said.




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QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
'Deeply reckless': Critics slam leaked police memo about Breonna Taylor

The memo was written several weeks after Taylor’s death and includes details that weren't provided to the judge in the search warrant application.


1598827361391.png


NBC
Aug. 30, 2020
By Laura Strickler
and Lisa Riordan Seville


A leaked Louisville Metro Police Department memo shows investigators had more evidence than previously made public showing a connection between Breonna Taylor and the main target of the narcotics probe that led officers to barge into her home the night she was shot dead by police.

But the memo was written several weeks after Taylor’s death and includes
details that weren't provided to the judge in the search warrant application as well as evidence that came to light after her death —prompting critics to slam it as an effort to smear Taylor and justify the deadly police raid.

The leaked memo, obtained by NBC News, addresses why the officers sought a warrant to enter Taylor’s apartment but says nothing about the use of force or other possible violations of Louisville police department policy, such as the blind firing of bullets into neighboring apartments.

“Breonna Taylor’s death was a tragedy. Period,” said Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, who called the leak an effort to “sway opinion and impact the investigation.”

"It is deeply reckless for this information, which presents only a small fraction of the entire investigation, to be shared with the media while the criminal process remains ongoing,” Fischer added.


1598827799188.png

Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency room technician, was killed after midnight on March 13 when officers broke down her door while executing a search warrant.

Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired a shot at the front door, striking one officer. He said he believed it was a home invasion. Police opened fire, hitting Taylor five times.

Both the FBI and the Kentucky attorney general are investigating the shooting.

Taylor, who had no criminal record, knew the target of the narcotics probe, Jamarcus Glover, as far back as 2016 when she was in her early 20s, according to the leaked police memo written by a detective.

The 39-page memo contains new information including that Taylor posted Glover’s bond after he was arrested in 2017. When he was arrested again in January 2020, the memo shows, he called Taylor at least three times from jail. In one call, Taylor told Glover that it’s stressful for her when he’s around because of his interactions with the police.

When Glover's car was towed in mid-February, he filed a complaint against a police officer and used Taylor's phone number as his point of contact, according to the memo.

Taylor was killed one month later.

The undated memo, first reported by the Louisville Courier-Journal, includes information from a May news memo, indicating the police document wasn’t finalized until at least two months after the fatal shooting.

“At a time when the public was being assured that the department was doing a thorough and impartial investigation into Breonna’s killing, [the department] was actually preparing a lengthy, one-sided report regarding things that their officers were unaware of at the time they killed Breonna,” said Taylor’s family lawyer Sam Aguiar.

At a press conference last week, Louisville Metro Police Department Interim Chief Robert Schroeder called the leak “simply not helpful” to the investigation and “irrelevant to our goal of obtaining justice, peace and healing for our community.”

The police department did not respond to a question about why the memo was written.

Questions have been raised as to whether or not the warrant used to go to Taylor’s apartment was valid. The memo indicates police had more information tying Taylor and Glover together than police presented to the court.

But legal experts said that the leaked document does not answer key questions that have swirled around the case: whether police announced who they were when they entered the apartment, whether the use of force was appropriate and whether there were other violations of police department policy.

Christopher Slobogin, director of the criminal justice program at Vanderbilt Law School, said those questions are crucial to the investigation.

“You need probable cause to get a warrant to get into a house — that doesn’t mean you’re set,” Slobogin said.

“You still need to execute a warrant properly,” he added. “You still have to knock and announce, or announce and avoid using excessive force.”

Alan Rozenshtein, associate professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, said the police practice of knocking on doors and announcing themselves has a long history dating back to English common law.

“Homes are sacred spaces. We want to give people a measure of dignity. Also it is to give everyone a moment to calm down,” said Rozenshtein, a constitutional law expert.

Rozenshtein said the police may want to maintain an element of surprise in certain cases, if they are looking for evidence that might be destroyed or believe delay could pose risks to safety. But Rozenshtein said they should still announce themselves — for their own safety and that of others.

"Knocking without announcing is not helpful," he said.

New information in the leaked memo includes transcripts of jailhouse phone calls between Glover and the mother of his child that took place after Taylor was killed.

In one call, Glover indicates Taylor may have held money for him.

"Bre got down like $15 (grand), she had the $8 (grand) I gave her the other day and she picked up another $6 grand,” Glover told the mother of his child, according to the transcript in the memo.

The police found no drugs or money inside Taylor’s apartment, according to the search warrant inventory document obtained by NBC News.

In an interview with the Courier-Journal last week, Glover denied that Taylor ever held money for him.

Glover’s attorney Scott Barton told NBC News that his client has long maintained that “Breonna Taylor had nothing to do with any drug transactions.”



.
 

thoughtone

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
'Deeply reckless': Critics slam leaked police memo about Breonna Taylor

The memo was written several weeks after Taylor’s death and includes details that weren't provided to the judge in the search warrant application.

.

 

QueEx

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Super Moderator
D.C. Police Fatally Shoot 18-Year-Old In Southeast


1599149945387.png
The shooting occurred on the 200 block of Orange Street in Southeast.


September 3, 2020

D.C. police shot and killed a teenager in Congress Heights on Wednesday afternoon, Metropolitan Police Chief Peter Newsham said.

Two relatives and police identified the victim as 18-year-old Deon Kay, who is Black.

“He was a good child,” said Earline Black, who identified herself as Kay’s aunt, at a protest outside the 7D police station on Alabama Avenue in Southeast Wednesday night. “I want justice.”

The shooting happened shortly before 4 p.m. in the 200 block of Orange Street SE.

Officers responded to the scene to “investigate a man with a gun” and found a group of people around a vehicle, according to a police statement. Two people fled on foot, and one “brandished a gun,” police said. According to that account, an officer fired once and hit Kay. The second person escaped.

D.C. police shared an image of a gun and said it belonged to Kay.

Police said they arrested two other people: Marcyelle Smith, 19, was charged with carrying a firearm without a license and Deonte Brown, 19, was charged with “no permit,” which appears to refer to operating a vehicle without a license.

The Metropolitan Police Department said in a statement the officers involved in the shooting have been placed on administrative leave, which is standard under the department’s policy.

D.C. Councilmember Trayon White said Wednesday afternoon that he spoke to Kay’s family and said the teenager lives about two blocks from where the shooting occurred.

“Some people say he was shot in the front, some people say he was shot in the back,” White said. “We’ve got to figure out what the truth is and what happened with that situation.”
 

QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
A White officer is charged in the fatal shooting of a Black man under California's tougher deadly-force law

1599176042217.png


CNN
By Topher Gauk-Roger
September 3, 2020


(CNN)A White officer has been charged with felony manslaughter in the fatal shooting in April of a Black man in a Walmart store, a crime alleged under a newly strengthened California law that requires police to use deadly force only when needed to defend human life, the county prosecutor said.

San Leandro Police Officer Jason Fletcher, 49, was charged Wednesday with voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of Steven Taylor, 33, after the pair scuffled over a baseball bat inside the store in the Northern California city, according to officials and court documents.

The charge comes amid intense nationwide scrutiny of police conduct following the death and severe injury of a string of Black men while in custody. California lawmakers last year enacted one of the strictest police deadly force measures in the country after a Sacramento prosecutor declined to charge two officers who killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed Black man, in his grandmother's backyard.
During the San Leandro confrontation, Taylor did not pose an immediate threat to police when Fletcher shot him to death, prosecutors determined, said Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley.

"The decision to file the criminal complaint was made after an intensive investigation and thorough analysis of the evidence and the current law," O'Malley said in a statement. "The work of Police Officers is critical to the health, safety, and well-being of our communities. Their job is one of the most demanding in our society, especially in these current challenging times. They are sworn to uphold and enforce the laws."

O'Malley cited the state legal standard that became effective January 1, noting its "intent is that peace officers use deadly force only when necessary in defense of human life. The legislature declared officers shall use other available resources and techniques if reasonably safe and feasible to an objectively reasonable officer."

Fletcher "was placed on leave after the incident and has been the entire time," San Leandro Police Chief Jeff Tudor told CNN on Thursday.
Fletcher's arraignment is set for September 15, she said. The officer's attorney and the San Leandro Police Officers Association did not immediately respond to CNN's requests for comment.

"As the Police Chief of San Leandro, I know the loss of Steven Taylor has deeply affected this community," reads a statement posted Wednesday from Tudor. "It is important that we allow the judicial process to take its course. I will refer all questions to the District Attorney's Office."

A deadly encounter of less than 40 seconds
Fletcher and another officer initially responded on the afternoon of April 18 to a report of an alleged shoplifter holding a baseball bat at the Walmart, according to a probable cause declaration cited by the district attorney's office. Taylor had been stopped by store security when he tried to leave without paying for the bat and a tent.

Fletcher didn't wait for his cover officer before heading over to Taylor in the shopping cart area, the police document reads. Fletcher tried to grab the bat from Taylor, it states, while pulling out his service pistol.


View attachment 3335
A gun points toward Steven Taylor in this image, taken from police bodycam video.
Taylor pulled the bat away, and the officer backed up.
Then, from about 17 feet away, Fletcher drew his stun gun and pointed it at Taylor, the document reads.​
"Officer Fletcher told Mr. Taylor to 'drop the bat man, drop the bat,'" the probable cause declaration states.​
"Officer Fletcher shot Mr. Taylor with his taser as he advanced towards Mr. Taylor.
Officer Fletcher tased Mr. Taylor again, and Mr. Taylor clearly experienced the shock of the taser as he was leaning forward over his feet and stumbling forward.​
"Mr. Taylor was struggling to remain standing as he pointed the bat at the ground," it continues.​
"Defendant Fletcher shot Mr. Taylor in the chest just as (a) backup Officer ... arrived in the store."
Taylor dropped the bat,
turned away from Fletcher
and fell to the ground, the police document says.​
Less than 40 seconds elapsed from the moment Fletcher entered the store to when Taylor hit the floor, it reads.​
The cause of Taylor's death was a single gunshot wound to his chest, the Alameda County Coroner's Bureau confirmed.

Officer body-camera video released from the incident shows a confrontation, beginning with Taylor holding a bat near the store's entrance. In the video, Fletcher asks Taylor to put the bat down. When he refuses, Fletcher shoots Taylor with his stun gun. Taylor, still standing, stumbles closer to the officer, who then fires his pistol. Taylor falls to the floor.

A review of statements from witnesses and the officers involved, as well as a review of multiple videos shows that at the time of the shooting, "it was not reasonable to conclude Mr. Taylor posed an imminent threat of death or great bodily injury to Officer Fletcher or to anyone else in the store," a DA's statement reads.

"Mr. Taylor posed no threat of imminent deadly force or serious bodily injury to defendant Fletcher or anyone else in the store,"
it states.

Citing limited resources, California's attorney general declined the city's request to launch an independent investigation into the case, AG Xavier Becerra wrote to San Leandro City Manager Jeff Kay in a July 9 letter.

The city's request included references to ongoing internal investigations by the San Leandro Police Department, including an administrative investigation into compliance with internal department policies, procedures and tactics, plus an investigation into whether any crimes were committed and the district attorney's office's independent criminal investigation into potential charges for the officers, Becerra wrote.

CNN's Jon Passantino, Cheri Mossburg and Michelle Krupa contributed to this report.



 

camdion1

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
A White officer is charged in the fatal shooting of a Black man under California's tougher deadly-force law

View attachment 3336


CNN
By Topher Gauk-Roger
September 3, 2020


(CNN)A White officer has been charged with felony manslaughter in the fatal shooting in April of a Black man in a Walmart store, a crime alleged under a newly strengthened California law that requires police to use deadly force only when needed to defend human life, the county prosecutor said.

San Leandro Police Officer Jason Fletcher, 49, was charged Wednesday with voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of Steven Taylor, 33, after the pair scuffled over a baseball bat inside the store in the Northern California city, according to officials and court documents.

The charge comes amid intense nationwide scrutiny of police conduct following the death and severe injury of a string of Black men while in custody. California lawmakers last year enacted one of the strictest police deadly force measures in the country after a Sacramento prosecutor declined to charge two officers who killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed Black man, in his grandmother's backyard.
During the San Leandro confrontation, Taylor did not pose an immediate threat to police when Fletcher shot him to death, prosecutors determined, said Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley.

"The decision to file the criminal complaint was made after an intensive investigation and thorough analysis of the evidence and the current law," O'Malley said in a statement. "The work of Police Officers is critical to the health, safety, and well-being of our communities. Their job is one of the most demanding in our society, especially in these current challenging times. They are sworn to uphold and enforce the laws."

O'Malley cited the state legal standard that became effective January 1, noting its "intent is that peace officers use deadly force only when necessary in defense of human life. The legislature declared officers shall use other available resources and techniques if reasonably safe and feasible to an objectively reasonable officer."

Fletcher "was placed on leave after the incident and has been the entire time," San Leandro Police Chief Jeff Tudor told CNN on Thursday.
Fletcher's arraignment is set for September 15, she said. The officer's attorney and the San Leandro Police Officers Association did not immediately respond to CNN's requests for comment.

"As the Police Chief of San Leandro, I know the loss of Steven Taylor has deeply affected this community," reads a statement posted Wednesday from Tudor. "It is important that we allow the judicial process to take its course. I will refer all questions to the District Attorney's Office."

A deadly encounter of less than 40 seconds
Fletcher and another officer initially responded on the afternoon of April 18 to a report of an alleged shoplifter holding a baseball bat at the Walmart, according to a probable cause declaration cited by the district attorney's office. Taylor had been stopped by store security when he tried to leave without paying for the bat and a tent.

Fletcher didn't wait for his cover officer before heading over to Taylor in the shopping cart area, the police document reads. Fletcher tried to grab the bat from Taylor, it states, while pulling out his service pistol.


View attachment 3335
A gun points toward Steven Taylor in this image, taken from police bodycam video.
Taylor pulled the bat away, and the officer backed up.
Then, from about 17 feet away, Fletcher drew his stun gun and pointed it at Taylor, the document reads.​
"Officer Fletcher told Mr. Taylor to 'drop the bat man, drop the bat,'" the probable cause declaration states.​
"Officer Fletcher shot Mr. Taylor with his taser as he advanced towards Mr. Taylor.
Officer Fletcher tased Mr. Taylor again, and Mr. Taylor clearly experienced the shock of the taser as he was leaning forward over his feet and stumbling forward.​
"Mr. Taylor was struggling to remain standing as he pointed the bat at the ground," it continues.​
"Defendant Fletcher shot Mr. Taylor in the chest just as (a) backup Officer ... arrived in the store."
Taylor dropped the bat,
turned away from Fletcher
and fell to the ground, the police document says.​
Less than 40 seconds elapsed from the moment Fletcher entered the store to when Taylor hit the floor, it reads.​
The cause of Taylor's death was a single gunshot wound to his chest, the Alameda County Coroner's Bureau confirmed.

Officer body-camera video released from the incident shows a confrontation, beginning with Taylor holding a bat near the store's entrance. In the video, Fletcher asks Taylor to put the bat down. When he refuses, Fletcher shoots Taylor with his stun gun. Taylor, still standing, stumbles closer to the officer, who then fires his pistol. Taylor falls to the floor.

A review of statements from witnesses and the officers involved, as well as a review of multiple videos shows that at the time of the shooting, "it was not reasonable to conclude Mr. Taylor posed an imminent threat of death or great bodily injury to Officer Fletcher or to anyone else in the store," a DA's statement reads.

"Mr. Taylor posed no threat of imminent deadly force or serious bodily injury to defendant Fletcher or anyone else in the store,"
it states.

Citing limited resources, California's attorney general declined the city's request to launch an independent investigation into the case, AG Xavier Becerra wrote to San Leandro City Manager Jeff Kay in a July 9 letter.

The city's request included references to ongoing internal investigations by the San Leandro Police Department, including an administrative investigation into compliance with internal department policies, procedures and tactics, plus an investigation into whether any crimes were committed and the district attorney's office's independent criminal investigation into potential charges for the officers, Becerra wrote.

CNN's Jon Passantino, Cheri Mossburg and Michelle Krupa contributed to this report.



Video show him with a gun drawn. He didn't try to give up.

 

QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
An Illinois police officer was fired after fatally shooting a Black teen
insider@.com (Taylor Ardrey)


October 24 2020



1603592122601.png
a group of people walking down the street: Demonstrators protest the October 20 police shooting that led to the death of 19-year-old Marcellis Stinnette and left his girlfriend, 20-year-old Tafara Williams, with serious injuries on October 22, 2020 in Waukegan, Illinois. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

© Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images Demonstrators protest the October 20 police shooting that led to the death of 19-year-old Marcellis Stinnette and left his girlfriend, 20-year-old Tafara Williams, with serious injuries on October 22, 2020 in Waukegan, Illinois. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images
  • An unidentified Illinois police office was terminated on Friday for his role in an incident where he discharged his firearm at a young Black couple who were sitting in their vehicle, according to ABC News.
  • On the night of October 20, 19-year-old Marcellis Stinnette, and 20-year-old Tafara Williams, were reversing their vehicle as the officer approached them.
  • The officer fired at the vehicle while the couple was inside "in fear for his safety," according to the police report published by WLS-TV.
  • Stinnette died from his injuries, while Williams is recovering from wounds to her hand and stomach.
  • Protests broke out in Waukegan, Illinois as demonstrators demanded answers from authorities, the Chicago-Sun Times reported.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.
An Illinois police officer was terminated for shooting at a Black couple while they were in their car on Tuesday— killing the teenage boy who occupied the passenger's seat, reports say.

ABC News reported that the unidentified officer of Waukegan, Illinois Police Department was terminated on Friday for the incident concerning 19-year-old Marcellis Stinnette, and 20-year-old Tafara Williams.

"In the evening hours of October 23, 2020 the City of Waukegan terminated the officer that discharged his firearm during that incident, for multiple policy and procedure violations," Waukegan Chief of Police Wayne Walles said, according to the report.

According to WLS-TV, when an officer went to inspect a "suspicious vehicle" on Tuesday at around 11:55 pm that was inhabited by Williams and Stinnette, the "car drove off."

A second officer who saw their car moments later and approached them, fired at the vehicle "in fear for his safety" as the duo reversed their car, according to the police department's statement published by WLS-TV. The officer who struck the couple is Hispanic, according to the report.

An eyewitness Darrell Mosier told WLS-TV, that the police officer got out of his vehicle and told Stinnette and Williams to stop moving their car. "He told her to stop. She was scared," he said.

He added: "She put her up hands, she started yelling, 'Why you got a gun?' She started screaming. He just started shooting."

Williams, who was the driver, and Stinnette, who was in the passenger's seat, were both transported to a local hospital after being shot, the news station reported. Stinnette died in the hospital while Williams—who was reportedly shot in the stomach and hand— is recovering from her injuries, authorities said.

"Why did you shoot? I didn't do nothing wrong. I have a license," Williams said while in the hospital, according to WLS-TV." You didn't tell me I was under arrest. Why did you just flame up my car like that? Why did you shoot?"

The incident is under "independent investigation" by Illinois State Police, Walles said in a statement, according to ABC News.

"Once that investigation has been completed, it will be turned over to the Lake County Illinois State's Attorney's Office for review," he said.

a close up of a person wearing a hat and glasses: Sherrellis Stinnette, the grandmother of 19-year-old Marcellis Stinnette, joins demonstrators protesting the October 20 police shooting that left her grandson dead and his girlfriend, 20-year-old Tafara Williams, with serious injuries on October 22, 2020 in Waukegan, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images

© Scott Olson/Getty Images Sherrellis Stinnette, the grandmother of 19-year-old Marcellis Stinnette, joins demonstrators protesting
the October 20 police shooting that left her grandson dead and his girlfriend, 20-year-old Tafara Williams, with serious injuries on
October 22, 2020 in Waukegan, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images

Demonstraters demand answers from local authorities
Ben Crump, a civil rights lawyer who has been representing families affected by police brutality, is one of the attornies representing Williams.

"Mrs. Williams' legal team will begin our own investigation into what happened during that incident, because we do not trust the police narrative in this case," Crump said in a news release on Friday. "We have seen over and over that the 'official' report when police kill Black people is far too often missing or misrepresenting details. We will share our findings with the public when we have uncovered the truth."

The Chicago Sun-Times reported that dozens of demonstrators gathered for protests in Waukegan—including members of Jacob Blake's family—calling for more answers on Thursday at the city's police station. Loved ones and protesters are skeptical about what really occurred during the night of the incident and don't "trust" authorities to spearhead the investigstion according to the newspaper.

"We would like justice, but we also would like police reform," Zhanellis Banks, who is Stinnette's sister, said according to WLS-TV.

Read the original article on Insider


 

QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
2 teens killed in Brevard deputy shooting; few details about what led to gunfire
18-year-old Sincere Pierce, 16- year-old Anthony Crooms fatally shot on Nov. 13

Emilee Speck, Digital journalist

November 16, 2020,
Updated: November 18, 2020



COCOA, Fla. – Three days after a Brevard County deputy-involved shooting in Cocoa, the sheriff’s office has confirmed two teenagers were killed during the incident.

Few details were released by the Sheriff’s Office, Cocoa police or the Florida Department of Law Enforcement on Nov. 13 after gunfire erupted in a Cocoa neighborhood around 10:30 a.m. The sheriff’s office didn’t confirm the deaths of 18-year-old Sincere Pierce and 16-year-old Angelo “AJ” Crooms until Monday.

According to the Sheriff’s Office, deputies were investigating an earlier incident near U.S. 1 and State Road 528 when deputies tried to make contact with two people in a car near Stetson Drive and Ivy Drive.

No information about what happened in the moments before the shooting was provided.

“At that time a deputy involved shooting incident occurred,” a news release from the sheriff’s office reads.

Crooms and Pierce, both of Cocoa, were taken to the hospital where they were pronounced dead.


 

QueEx

Rising Star
Super Moderator
2 teens killed in Brevard deputy shooting
18-year-old Sincere Pierce,
16- year-old Anthony Crooms, fatally shot

Mother of slain Cocoa teen, Sincere Pierce,
shot during burial service
Sincere Pierce, 18, and Angelo Crooms, 16, had been shot
to death Nov. 13 by a Brevard County Sheriff’s deputy.



COCOA — An unknown gunman fired into a crowd gathered at a Saturday afternoon burial service of a teenager who was fatally shot by a Florida sheriff’s deputy earlier this month, officials said.

The deceased teen’s mother was wounded by the bullet, Florida Today reported.

The shooting happened as guests gathered at Riverview
Memorial Gardens to pay their respects to 18-year-old Sincere Pierce. Pierce and 16-year-old Angelo Crooms were killed Nov. 13 by a Brevard County Sheriff’s deputy.

The shot rang out as the pastor had just finished his prayers and the teen’s friends and loved ones were placing flowers on the casket, the newspaper reported. The loud popping sound was followed by stunned silence before Quasheda Pierce screamed that she’d been hit.

The newspaper reported that mourners were at first slow to react before realizing what had occurred. They began rushing to nearby cars and leaving the funeral quickly.

Friends and family members helped Quasheda Pierce into a minivan before ambulances arrived. Deputies carrying rifles arrived a short time later in response to multiple 911 calls.

The mother was taken to a hospital, but the severity of her injury was not immediately known.

Detectives and crime scene investigators remained at the cemetery throughout the afternoon Saturday, the newspaper reported.

The teens were killed when Deputy Jafet Santiago-Miranda fired multiple shots into their car when the teens didn’t pull over. Sheriff Wayne Ivey had said the deputies thought the vehicle might have been stolen, but the teens’ families and lawyer, Natalie Jackson, said they had permission to use the car and called it a case of mistaken identity.

Their deaths captured national interest, with well-known civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump working on behalf of the families in what he called a bid for justice.

Ivey has released dashcam footage from the Nov. 13 shooting that showed the teens pulling into a driveway after being followed by two sheriff’s cars without lights. Crooms, who was driving, then backed out of the driveway and drove forward in the direction of a deputy, who, gun drawn, repeatedly shouted at the teen to stop the car.


The sheriff said in a Facebook post that the deputy “was then forced to fire his service weapon in an attempt to stop the deadly threat of the car from crashing into him.”



Mother of slain Cocoa teen shot during burial service (tampabay.com)
 
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