Official Protest Thread...

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
I didn't want to keep flooding the other threads with the protest information, and there was a whole lot of content I wasn't posting because I didn't want to make a new thread for everything. So this will be a catch all of content. It will be full of #BlackLivesMatter content, mostly protest related, also content regarding DeRay, Netta, Et al, because those are the ones out on the front lines protesting and BLM is the blanket term used to refer to everything by the media. If you have a problem with that, you may want to click the back button. I reserve the right to delete off topic posts without warning. If you want to disparage #BLM or flaunt conspiracy theories, make a thread regarding that subject and have a separate discussion.

You know we probably do need a separate thread specifically for the protest related info.

 
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Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
http://www.justinccohen.com/blog/2016/7/11/interview-johnetta-netta-elzie-sharhonda-bossier-discuss-the-protests-in-baton-rouge

Interview: Johnetta "Netta" Elzie & Sharhonda Bossier Discuss the Protests in Baton Rouge
July 11, 2016


This morning I caught up with Johnetta Elzie and Sharhonda Bossier. Elzie, better known as “Netta,” is a co-founder of Campaign Zero. Bossier is deputy executive director of Education Leaders of Color and was campaign manager for the mayoral campaign of DeRay McKesson. They spoke with me on the phone from Louisiana, where they are participating in protests.

Johnetta Elzie


Johnetta Elzie

Me: What's the context for protest in Baton Rouge?

Bossier: Just to add some color around the culture of south Louisiana, as someone who has deep roots here, even though I haven’t lived my whole life here. There is a different degree of activism infrastructure here, due to a completely elevated kind of fear. There is a sense of fear that permeates the Black community because of the long, violent, public, unpunished history of racial violence here. That’s in the groundwater. When you think about the way that people mobilize, it’s important to think about the historical context of a place like Baton Rouge, and think of all of the ways that the police have been violent for generations.

This action feels connected to the broader national momentum that has been built. What we are seeing is that people are grateful for the experience from the national movement and are excited to get something launched and going.

Sharhonda Bossier


Sharhonda Bossier

Me: And what's the view from the ground right now?

Elzie: Gosh. As far as I can see, it’s the same here as it is pretty much everywhere. The energy is from the youth, most of whom are the most disenfranchised in the city. That’s who’s outside, that’s who’s making noise. They are craving guidance and leadership. They want ideas. They want someone that can come up with a plan that they can buy into. They want to engage in things, and take the right actions. The older folks with the resources don’t want to give resources without conditions. The young people, the most disenfranchised people, aren’t receptive to that.

The police here are probably the worst I have ever seen. That’s something, coming from me. I’ve never seen police like this. Here they literally smile with their guns pointed, while they chase Black kids. That’s like a next level evil that I wasn’t ready for. You don’t have to live in the city to police here. That reminds me of Baltimore, where these cops come in from surrounding areas, where they live. You might watch Fox News at home and fly a Confederate flag. Then you come to the city to police black people. It’s frightening. I have never seen police smile while they torture and terrorize black people. It’s scary. But even though it’s scary, it doesn’t stop people from coming out and doing things that can lead to arrest.


Me: How have folks received you?

Elzie: I’ve never heard “Ferguson” used as a curse word so much as by older people! (Laughter) People are like, “We don’t want no Ferguson shit.”

I was like, “Ferguson got results though.”

That was hard to stomach. They only think of Ferguson as rioting. That’s the older, respectable “we have resources” crowd. The crowd that only offers things with conditions

On the streets, though, it’s different. When we were out last night, where Alton [Sterling] was killed, we were talking to this guy who could tell by our accents that we weren’t from here. When we told him we’re from St Louis, his eyes got big, and he like flipped out. I thought it was about to be like an issue, so I had to be on guard. But then the local guy was like, “If you guys are here, this shit must be real.”

And I was like ,“This shit was real before we showed up, you don’t need us to come down and make it real.” It’s unreal the love that the local folks are showing us.


One thing the Ferguson crew learned is that you don’t have to ask permission to protest. There’s a need for folks to do action together all the time. I don’t normally take my grandma’s advice, but she’s a big defender of the idea that, if you’re worried about everyone else’s business, you can’t focus on your own. If I’m worried about what actions seventeen other groups are doing, I can never perfect my own. Some folks don’t understand, that If you just show leadership, and just act like a leader, people will fuck with whatever you’re doing. If you have a plan, if it’s solid, if it’s well thought out? Folks want initiative, not a bunch of older folks screaming, “You voted for me.”

Me: More than a hundred people, including DeRay McKesson, who was released and is with you guys right now, got arrested the other night. Did the district attorney ever charge anybody?

Netta: They charged everyone with the same thing, “impeding the regular use of a highway,” I think, something real crazy like that. But they were all charged with it. It’s like a $250 bill.

Me: How does that compare the kind of treatment you’ve seen in other cities?

Netta: They always find a way to charge protestors with some minor infractions. In St Louis it’s usually “impeding traffic.” We got arrested once for “blocking the regular use of a federal door.” But they just give us all the same charge, no matter how far you are from the door. It allows the police to charge whoever they want.

From a tactical perspective, though, on the back end, nobody [at the jail] was ready to deal with 130 protestors in two hours. When we talk to people like Harry Balafonte, who was involved in the movement of the last generation, he always says it’s smart to flood the system.

Every little part of protest is exposing just how fucked up everything is, from the fines, to the prosecution, to the violence. I don’t know if everyone sees it. If you’re from another place, and you’ve done this before, it’s easy to spot the good things that protestors are doing. They don’t have the language yet sometimes.

Me: What else do folks need to know? It's really hard to sort out what's happening from afar.

Netta: If you are watching the news before nightfall, it will be easy to believe the police narrative. It goes like this: everything was peaceful, then the police just had to react to protect themselves. Everything is peaceful, even after nightfall. The police want to do things in the dark. That’s not new. That’s not different. They wait until it’s dark. I would say it’s smarter to turn off the TV and turn on Twitter or Vine or Periscope. If you’re always reading or listening to the police narrative, you’ll always believe it.
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
Bail fund in case anyone is interested in donating to get protestors bailed out:

https://www.crowdrise.com/baton-rouge-bail-fund

Baton Rouge Legal Defense Fund
Organized by: Louisiana National Lawyers Guild


Thanks To Our 5,242 Donors! Almost Everyone Has Bonded Out

July 12, 2016

The Legal Team has been working literally 24-7 to track all arrestees, speed up internal processes at the jail, secure bond reductions, pressure judges, post bonds, staff our hotlines, take affidavits, collect evidence, coordinate criminal defense volunteers, draft litigation, train legal observers, staff LO needs, and--YES--get everyone out. Most of the folks who are still in jail as of 11:59 Monday night have priors or are facing more serious charges; we are working on their cases as fast as possible.

Money from this fund is absolutely available to anyone who posted bond on their own and not through the Legal Team. Questions about reimbursements should be directed to batonrougelegalnlg@gmail.com. Thank you everyone for your generosity! We wish you could see the smiles when we tell people they're not going to have to worry about paying their legal costs and that 5,242 donors from all over the world threw down for #northbatonrougematters #blacklivesmatter #justiceforaltonsterling.


THE STORY:
Since Friday, July 8, more than 200 people have been arrested in protests against the killing of Alton Sterling. This fund will cover all aspects of legal support for arrestees--most urgently, their bail and court fees.

This page is managed by the Louisiana National Lawyers Guild with the support of #NorthBatonRougeMatters and BYP100.

Call our legal hotline at (225) 341-2287 or email batonrougelegalnlg@gmail.com with any questions about the fund or legal support for protesters.
 

godofwine

Supreme Porn Poster - Ret
BGOL Investor
Can one of you provide me with the official GoFundMe accounts for Philando Castille and Alton Sterling's families. I heard they are some bogus ones out there with people trying to come up that arent associated with the person or families
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
Can one of you provide me with the official GoFundMe accounts for Philando Castille and Alton Sterling's families. I heard they are some bogus ones out there with people trying to come up that arent associated with the person or families
There were two I saw for Castile. The first one is the one I saw originally, but they have an update stating Philando's sister requested they use hers.

The original:

His sister's:


There is a scholarship fund for Alton's children. This is the one that was listed in USA Today:

 

godofwine

Supreme Porn Poster - Ret
BGOL Investor
There were two I saw for Castile. The first one is the one I saw originally, but they have an update stating Philando's sister requested they use hers.

The original:

His sister's:


There is a scholarship fund for Alton's children. This is the one that was listed in USA Today:

Would you mind trying again in a different way, it says plug-in not supported on my phone. Thank you
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
Would you mind trying again in a different way, it says plug-in not supported on my phone. Thank you
Give me a second to get back to my pc. The forum formats the links so that it displays as flash content.
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
http://www.mtv.com/news/2902525/black-lives-matter-is-the-bare-minimum/

Black Lives Matter Is The Bare Minimum
The systems that reiterate racism in this nation must be dismantled



Last week, a video was released of a police officer killing 37-year-old Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge. He was armed, but Louisiana is an open carry state. The same was true for 34-year-old Philando Castile of Minnesota: He let the officer know that he had a gun, and he was shot four times in front of his fiancée and daughter while reaching for his wallet.

Yet again, black people have to deal with the grief of watching one of our own murdered while knowing that justice will not be served. We have to deal with others blaming us for the deaths of our brethren — for somehow being too scary, for not making ourselves small enough. We must be respectful of others at all times, lest they literally kill us.

This is a fucking problem. That needs to be admitted. But admitting it is not the only step.

It’s not enough for people to say “black lives matter” and then be silent. We need to do more than speak. We need to push for better laws to protect our people and to put pressure on police departments. Nothing will change unless the police system is completely stripped down and rebuilt. The fundamental problem is that so many American institutions were founded with only white people in mind — and they were never changed.

Ta-Nehisi Coates explains this well in his Atlantic piece “The Case for Reparations.” He makes several points in this piece that profoundly resonated with me, but I’m still haunted by one in particular: America has racked up so many horrors done to black people without ever acknowledging them — like someone amassing debt on a credit card, then deciding not to use the card anymore, but being confused when the debt does not magically disappear. The thing is, this “debt” of crimes and violence committed against black people not only fails to disappear, it continues to build. It grows and grows and grows.

For so long, it seemed like black people were the only ones who could see this debt. Finally that’s starting to change, and other people are realizing it exists. But those who are just now starting to pay attention, who have watched the videos of the murders of innocent black people and want them to stop happening, have to do more than merely admit that black lives matter.

The disregard for our lives is a heavy load for black people to carry, every single day. You see a cop staring at you and wonder if this could be the day that something happens. You wonder what picture of you they’ll use. You wonder if you would’ve ever gotten the chance to make something of yourself.

I want to be remembered. I want to make art that people love and take in over and over again. Even more, I want security. I want money, enough to ensure a future for my family, for others, for myself. I want to have power. I want to bypass all the white gatekeepers who have so much power. I want to provide ways for other black people to do the same — to do anything else that seems unbelievable.

But then I look at the black people being killed in the street. I look at how things do not change. I look at how many times this happens. I see my brothers and sisters growing tired.

I also grow tired: tired of saying the same things, tired of respectability politics. I don’t aim to earn the respect of someone who believes a black person must have a fully formed debate ready whenever we simply state that our lives matter. I know that my voice is just one of many, that it might not be heard at all. But I will use it on behalf of Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice and so many others whose voices will never be heard again.

I do not want to be too tired to be rich one day, to have a production company, to make movies and plays and books. I do not want to die before this happens. I fear that my dreams and goals will be stolen from me. I fear that I’ll fall into the same cycle that so many in my family are in, that so many black people around the country are in, of being poor, of being stuck, of being unable to move.

I’m scared of being slaughtered in the street like an animal. I’m scared of the people who are supposed to protect me. I’m scared of white people.

But even more than being scared, I’m angry.

White people steal. They steal and steal and steal. They steal our bodies and our hopes and our dreams and our chances. This is gaslighting, it is abuse, it is murder. It is outrageous. It is disgusting. It is despicable. And adding insult to injury, it has to be proven, over and over again. It is ignored because white people benefit from the system that is in place, the system that holds the rest of us down.

Black Lives Matter is the bare fucking minimum. Don’t act like you’re doing something monumental for me by chanting a slogan. No matter how many times you or I say those words, black people are still being ridiculed and torn apart and killed. Nothing is changing.

What am I supposed to do about it? I will continue to call for systemic change — for the police to be held accountable, for the many systems that reiterate racism in this nation to be dismantled.

But should that fail to happen, should these systems continue to oppress us, I suppose that all that’s left is to wait for everything to explode.

When riots happen, black people are called animals — the opportunity to have an excuse to dehumanize us is gleefully taken. If these things happened to white people, everyone would riot: It would be the humane thing to do.

Black people have exhausted so many options — protesting and ignoring and going through the legal system — that I wouldn’t be surprised if riots are the next option. We want real change, but if it is continually denied to us, we’ll riot because we’re in pain. Because we’re ignored.

What else are we supposed to do?
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/07/the-near-certainty-of-anti-police-violence/490541/

The Near Certainty of Anti-Police Violence

By ignoring illegitimate policing, America has also failed to address the danger this illegitimacy poses to those who must do the policing.


Last month, the Obama administration accused Donald Trump of undercutting American legitimacy in the eyes of the world. Trump’s call to ban Muslims wasn’t just morally wrong, according to Vice President Joe Biden, it called “into question America’s status as the greatest democracy in the history of the world.” President Obama followed Biden by asserting that Trump’s rhetoric “doesn’t reflect our democratic ideals,” saying “it will make us less safe, fueling ISIL’s notion that the West hates Muslims.” His point was simple—wanton discrimination in policy and rhetoric undercuts American legitimacy and fuels political extremism. This lesson is not limited to Donald Trump, and it applies as well abroad as it does at home.

Last week, 25-year-old Micah Xavier Johnson murdered five police officers in Dallas. This abhorrent act of political extremism cannot be divorced from American history—recent or old. In black communities, the police departments have only enjoyed a kind of quasi-legitimacy. That is because wanton discrimination is definitional to the black experience, and very often it is law enforcement which implements that discrimination with violence. A community consistently subjected to violent discrimination under the law will lose respect for it, and act beyond it. When such actions stretch to mass murder it is horrific. But it is also predictable.

To understand the lack of police legitimacy in black communities, consider the contempt in which most white Americans hold O.J. Simpson. Consider their feelings toward the judge and jury in the case. And then consider that this is approximately how black people have felt every few months for generations. It’s not just that the belief that Officer Timothy Loehmann got away with murdering a 12-year-old Tamir Rice, it is the reality that police officers have been getting away with murdering black people since the advent of American policing. The injustice compounds, congeals until there is an almost tangible sense of dread and grievance that compels a community to understand the police as objects of fear, not respect.

What does it mean, for instance, that black children are ritually told that any stray movement in the face of the police might result in their own legal killing? When Eric Holder spoke about getting “The Talk” from his father, and then giving it to his own son, many of us nodded our heads. But many more of us were terrified. When the nation’s top cop must warn his children to be skeptical of his own troops, how legitimate can the police actually be?

And it is not as if Holder is imagining things. When the law shoots down 12-year-old children, or beats down old women on traffic islands, or chokes people to death over cigarettes; when the law shoots people over compact discs, traffic stops, drivers’ licenses, loud conversation, or car trouble; when the law auctions off its monopoly on lethal violence to bemused civilians, when these civilians then kill, and when their victims are mocked in their death throes; when people stand up to defend police as officers of the state, and when these defenders are killed by these very same officers; when much of this is recorded, uploaded, live-streamed, tweeted, and broadcast; and when government seems powerless, or unwilling, to stop any of it, then it ceases, in the eyes of citizens, to be any sort of respectable law at all. It simply becomes “force.”

In the black community, it’s the force they deploy, and not any higher American ideal, that gives police their power. This is obviously dangerous for those who are policed. Less appreciated is the danger illegitimacy ultimately poses to those who must do the policing. For if the law represents nothing but the greatest force, then it really is indistinguishable from any other street gang. And if the law is nothing but a gang, then it is certain that someone will resort to the kind of justice typically meted out to all other powers in the street.

The Talk is testament to something that went very wrong, long ago, with law enforcement, something that we are scared to see straight. That something has very little to do with the officer on the beat and everything to do with ourselves. There’s a sense that the police departments of America have somehow gone rogue. In fact, the police are one of the most trusted institutions in the country. This is not a paradox. The policies which the police carry out are not the edicts of a dictatorship but the work, as Biden put it, of “the greatest democracy in the history of the world.” Avoiding this fact is central to the current conversation around “police reform” which focuses solely on the actions of police officers and omits everything that precedes these actions. But analyzing the present crisis in law enforcement solely from the contested street, is like analyzing the Iraq War solely from the perspective of Abu Ghraib. And much like the Iraq War, there is a strong temptation to focus on the problems of “implementation,” as opposed to building the kind of equitable society in which police force is used as sparingly as possible.

There is no short-cut out. Sanctimonious cries of nonviolence will not help. “Retraining” can only do so much. Until we move to the broader question of policy, we can expect to see Walter Scotts and Freddie Grays with some regularity. And the extent to which we are tolerant of the possibility of more Walter Scotts and Freddie Grays is the extent to which we are tolerant of the possibility of more Micah Xavier Johnsons.
 

futureshock

Renegade of this atomic age
Registered
Protesters stage sit-in outside Governor's mansion; Mayor agrees to meeting
by: Carl Willis, Matt Johnson, Tom Jones Updated: Jul 12, 2016 - 12:46 AM
http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/atlanta/protesters-march-through-buckhead-in-fifth-night-or-protests/397056654


TIMELINE: Day 5 of protests in Atlanta



ATLANTA -- Day five of protests in Atlanta is underway and has been eventful. 11Alive has multiple crews in the field with the protesters and will keep this story up to date with any information as it develops.

Below is a timeline of events of the protest as they unfolded.

12:40 a.m. -- Protests come to a peaceful end.

12:14 a.m. -- After meeting with protestors Monday night, Mayor Kasim Reed agrees to formal, two-hour meeting with protesters Monday July 18 after a "cooling off period." Protesters declare the night a "win" for their movement.

11:35 p.m. -- 11Alive reporters on the scene say Mayor Kasim Reed is on the scene of protests outside of Governor's Mansion.

11:19 p.m. -- Atlanta Police Chief George Turner arrived to the scene of the protests to meet with Black Lives Matter activists.

VIDEO | Police Chief George Turner speaks to protesters at Governor's Mansion


Atlanta Police Chief George Turner speaks to demonstrators at Governor's Mansion


10:10 p.m. -- Protesters tell 11Alive they will not leave until Mayor Kasim Reed, Atlanta Police Chief agree to meet with them. 11Alive has contacted both offices for comment.




Kaitlyn Ross 11Alive
✔@kaitlynross1

Black Lives Matter Protesters in Atlanta say they refuse to leave the Gov's mansion until Mayor @KasimReed comes out
10:29 PM - 11 Jul 2016





9:58 p.m. -- 11Alive's Kaitlyn Ross reports protesters say they're prepared to spend the night in front of the Governor's Mansion.

9:42 p.m. -- Protesters sit in front of Governor's Mansion, shout "Hands up, don't shoot!"

9:17 p.m. -- Demonstration arrives in front of Governor's Mansion on West Paces Ferry Road. Heavy police presence in the area.

9:02 p.m. -- Protest crowds on the move again marching down West Paces Ferry Road near East Andrews road. Reports that protesters are moving on to Governor's Mansion.

RAW VIDEO | Protesters arrested in Atlanta during day 5 of marches




8:42 p.m. -- Reports of arrests taking place. 11Alive reporters on the scene report at least 10 people in handcuffs.



View image on Twitter


Follow
Kaitlyn Ross 11Alive
✔@kaitlynross1

Line forming of people in cuffs being loaded on to atlanta prisoner transport
8:33 PM - 11 Jul 2016






8:09 p.m. -- Hundreds of protesters sit down in the middle of Peachtree Street and Lenox Road intersection.

8:00 p.m. -- Law enforcement, protesters come face to face during march. Police block off access to GA 400 near Lenox.



View image on Twitter


Follow
Kaitlyn Ross 11Alive

✔@kaitlynross1

Protesters shut down intersection of Peachtree Rd and Lenox Mall. Traffic around it is crazy
8:08 PM - 11 Jul 2016





7:52 p.m. -- Police, security for Lenox Square Mall block entrance of the mall area to protesters.

7:48 p.m. -- Lenox Road in Buckhead is shut down near Lenox Square Mall as hundreds of protesters make their way through Atlanta streets.

7:30 p.m. -- Protesters are on the move from the station toward Lenox Square Mall.

7:07 p.m. -- Protesters begin gathering at the Lenox MARTA station in Buckhead.

PHOTOS | Day 5 of protests in Atlanta






 

Megatron X

A Prophet of Doom
BGOL Investor
Protests don't work. Niggaz been doing that and cops keep shooting them down in the street. You have to go beyond boycotts, don't just hold your money for a certain amount of time. Gotta build your own economic infrastructure. It seems like they only respond to physically retaliation and you taking money out their pockets. That's it.

Another thing I'm not gonna keep supporting these families who keep saying that racism was not a factor or clown the protesters. Or the ones who talk that forgive shit. You're not getting any financial or other support from me.
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
Protesters stage sit-in outside Governor's mansion; Mayor agrees to meeting
by: Carl Willis, Matt Johnson, Tom Jones Updated: Jul 12, 2016 - 12:46 AM
http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/atlanta/protesters-march-through-buckhead-in-fifth-night-or-protests/397056654


TIMELINE: Day 5 of protests in Atlanta



ATLANTA -- Day five of protests in Atlanta is underway and has been eventful. 11Alive has multiple crews in the field with the protesters and will keep this story up to date with any information as it develops.

Below is a timeline of events of the protest as they unfolded.

12:40 a.m. -- Protests come to a peaceful end.

12:14 a.m. -- After meeting with protestors Monday night, Mayor Kasim Reed agrees to formal, two-hour meeting with protesters Monday July 18 after a "cooling off period." Protesters declare the night a "win" for their movement.

11:35 p.m. -- 11Alive reporters on the scene say Mayor Kasim Reed is on the scene of protests outside of Governor's Mansion.

11:19 p.m. -- Atlanta Police Chief George Turner arrived to the scene of the protests to meet with Black Lives Matter activists.

VIDEO | Police Chief George Turner speaks to protesters at Governor's Mansion


Atlanta Police Chief George Turner speaks to demonstrators at Governor's Mansion


10:10 p.m. -- Protesters tell 11Alive they will not leave until Mayor Kasim Reed, Atlanta Police Chief agree to meet with them. 11Alive has contacted both offices for comment.




Kaitlyn Ross 11Alive
✔@kaitlynross1

Black Lives Matter Protesters in Atlanta say they refuse to leave the Gov's mansion until Mayor @KasimReed comes out
10:29 PM - 11 Jul 2016





9:58 p.m. -- 11Alive's Kaitlyn Ross reports protesters say they're prepared to spend the night in front of the Governor's Mansion.

9:42 p.m. -- Protesters sit in front of Governor's Mansion, shout "Hands up, don't shoot!"

9:17 p.m. -- Demonstration arrives in front of Governor's Mansion on West Paces Ferry Road. Heavy police presence in the area.

9:02 p.m. -- Protest crowds on the move again marching down West Paces Ferry Road near East Andrews road. Reports that protesters are moving on to Governor's Mansion.

RAW VIDEO | Protesters arrested in Atlanta during day 5 of marches




8:42 p.m. -- Reports of arrests taking place. 11Alive reporters on the scene report at least 10 people in handcuffs.



View image on Twitter


Follow
Kaitlyn Ross 11Alive
✔@kaitlynross1

Line forming of people in cuffs being loaded on to atlanta prisoner transport
8:33 PM - 11 Jul 2016






8:09 p.m. -- Hundreds of protesters sit down in the middle of Peachtree Street and Lenox Road intersection.

8:00 p.m. -- Law enforcement, protesters come face to face during march. Police block off access to GA 400 near Lenox.



View image on Twitter


Follow
Kaitlyn Ross 11Alive

✔@kaitlynross1

Protesters shut down intersection of Peachtree Rd and Lenox Mall. Traffic around it is crazy
8:08 PM - 11 Jul 2016





7:52 p.m. -- Police, security for Lenox Square Mall block entrance of the mall area to protesters.

7:48 p.m. -- Lenox Road in Buckhead is shut down near Lenox Square Mall as hundreds of protesters make their way through Atlanta streets.

7:30 p.m. -- Protesters are on the move from the station toward Lenox Square Mall.

7:07 p.m. -- Protesters begin gathering at the Lenox MARTA station in Buckhead.

PHOTOS | Day 5 of protests in Atlanta






The crowds have always been diverse, but even more so this time around. The video said they chose an upscale area to disrupt, probably a smart move since rich folks want problems out of sight so they can be out of mind. Also, though it is unlikely protestors would riot or destroy property, the mayor and governor are probably getting pressure from local residents due to fear of this happening anyway.
 

futureshock

Renegade of this atomic age
Registered
The crowds have always been diverse, but even more so this time around. The video said they chose an upscale area to disrupt, probably a smart move since rich folks want problems out of sight so they can be out of mind. Also, though it is unlikely protestors would riot or destroy property, the mayor and governor are probably getting pressure from local residents due to fear of this happening anyway.
Oh yeah, fa sho.

If the mayor wants to kiss up to the gubner or become gov one day...then he had better handle "the problem" or tackle the issue and resolve it somehow. If he lets the pot boil over or does not de-escalate the situation...then he could be viewed as a poor "crisis management" guy to some potential (white) voters in the future.

Some continue to say that matching does nothing. I still think that there is a time and place for it in some instances, because it can still generate some levels of fear. And it usually cannot be controlled by those who are targeted by it. So it gets attention (to warn, inform and update) and I also think that is a good thing.

I heard DBozeman on 1380 WOAK say that if the marching & protests did not happen, then that officer in Atlanta might not have been fired yesterday. If the marching & protests which grew into a movement did not happen then maybe the make up of Ferguson's city govt.....might not have changed. I agree with him to some degree.

Now thanks to the BLM movement some these younger kids are making a list of demands for elected officials to consider. SOME get meettings and sitdowns in the wake of the marches and protests. That can influence or bring about various levels of change.

They are about to snatch the torch from many of these fake, scared, uppity, stalled out, too old to represent for the movement anymore cats. And symbolic or not I also see that as a good thing. Because I do not think that these short attention span kids will go for dangling a carrot full of promises in their faces for week, months, years or decades as a form of appeasement.

Remember a BLM chick ran up in Hillary's camp to question her a few months ago. The media hardly touched on that for long. Or even bothered to amalyze the true meaning behind it. The media did not loop that over and over. Ever seen a black preacher do anything like that lately or ever?

One of my favorite moments of 2016

These people are out there now. They have a voice now. Soon they will have a larger platform. Did the NAACP just turn down a opportunity to speak at the democratic convention? WTF?

I applaud them for what it is...but I hope that strong results, strong influence and strong leadership are some of the fruits of their battles.
 
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Entrepronegro

Not your average Joe
BGOL Investor
Protests don't work. Niggaz been doing that and cops keep shooting them down in the street. You have to go beyond boycotts, don't just hold your money for a certain amount of time. Gotta build your own economic infrastructure. It seems like they only respond to physically retaliation and you taking money out their pockets. That's it.

Another thing I'm not gonna keep supporting these families who keep saying that racism was not a factor or clown the protesters. Or the ones who talk that forgive shit. You're not getting any financial or other support from me.
True
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
Just saw this, not sure if I will be participating or how well others are since it's currently trending on twitter...lol...




 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
This is late but I wasn't on twitter yesterday so I didn't see it. If you are in Baltimore BmoreDoc is a great person to follow on twitter. He is very active and outspoken on black issues. I've learned a lot about redlining and other issues there from following him. Also see #AFROMATION on twitter. Here are some related tweets along with a spattering of other ones to see how awesome he is.


















 

futureshock

Renegade of this atomic age
Registered
Root of the problem...we need more whistle blowers:


EXCLUSIVE: Veteran Dallas cop breaks ranks to slam 'public face of togetherness' and claim black community mistrusts police because they are WRONGLY arrested to help fill arrest 'quotas'

  • Dallas police officer Nick Novello, 62, accused his police chief David Brown of failing the public
  • The 34-year veteran with the force claims Brown is at the helm of a police team low on morale and over worked with insufficient pay
  • He said the police chief was guilty of 'grandstanding' in his public appeal to hire more young black men to his force
  • He claimed that the Dallas Police Department had been plunged into an all time low with many disillusioned officers serving the public
  • He said much of the black community in Dallas distrusts the police force
  • Novello said many had been wrongly arrested for small amounts of marijuana or public intoxication to help fulfill arrest 'quotas'
  • He added that police chief Brown had defied calls from four police associations in Dallas to resign last spring
By SHEKHAR BHATIA and RYAN PARRY and BEN ASHFORD and RUTH STYLES IN DALLAS, TEXAS, FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 12:52 EST, 12 July 2016 | UPDATED: 13:39 EST, 12 July 2016

A veteran Dallas police officer has broken ranks and spoken out over what he claims is a department rife with bitterness and fear, following last week's slaying of five cops.

Officer Nick Novello, 62, who is a serving officer with 34 years on the beat in Dallas, accused his police chief David Brown of failing the public by being at the helm of a police team low on morale and over worked with insufficient pay.

He said the police chief was guilty of 'grandstanding' in his public appeal to hire more young black men to his force.

And he claimed that the Dallas Police Department had been plunged into an all time low with many disillusioned officers serving the public.





Dallas police officer Nick Novello, 62, accused his police chief David Brown of failing the public. The 34-year veteran with the force claims Brown is at the helm of a police team low on morale and over worked with insufficient pay




He claimed that the Dallas Police Department had been plunged into an all time low with many disillusioned officers serving the public. Novello also claimed that much of the black community in Dallas distrusts the police

Brown reached out to black protesters angered at the shootings of young black men by officers and who had demonstrated on his city's streets.

He said: 'We're hiring. We'll give you an application. We'll help you resolve some of the problems you're protesting about.

'And we'll put you in your neighborhood, and we will help you resolve some of the problems you're protesting about.'

But Novello said large numbers of the black community in Dallas distrusted the police and had been wrongly arrested to help fulfill an arrest 'quota' laid down on officers.

He said: 'If he wants them to sign up, he had better stop criminalizing them for things like having small amounts of marijuana.

'Some officers fit people up by arresting them for being intoxicated when they refuse to show their IDs and that leads to a criminal record and difficulties in finding a job.

'Officers are under pressure to reach targets. There has to be an end to the arrest and ticket quota that exists within the Dallas police department.

'I am sick and tired of the public face of togetherness the chief puts on when he knows there's a lot of bad feeling behind the scenes.'

Novello, who was on duty the morning after last Thursday's murderous attack by Micah Johnson on his colleagues, said police chief Brown had defied calls from four police associations in Dallas to resign last spring.




+7
Novello claims that Brown (pictured) was guilty of 'grandstanding' in his public appeal to hire more young black men to his force

'If we can't man the streets, the only viable solution would be that we embrace the assistance of the national guard or some federal agency to help us police the streets of Dallas.

'It would be very unpalatable because it would mean the loss of state city sovereignty.'

He claimed the public was being wrongly led to believe that a full police service was being offered up in Dallas.

He said: 'As a police officer I can look you in the eye and say "We have got your back, we are out there patrolling"… but no we are not.

'I can recall a number of days when I went to detail in the morning and there might have been seven of us there and after they have put officers on special assignment, there was one or two police officers for the whole district.




+7

Black veteran Micah Johnson opened fire at a peaceful protest on Thursday, killing five cops and injuring 12

'There is a lot of anger out there that we have an inability to police ourselves and we will protect a rogue cop as a police department.'

Chief Brown, however, says he is proud that homicides and other violent crimes have been reduced over recent years in Dallas and released a YouTube video asking for ideas from his officers to continue the 'great success' the department had achieved over the pas year.

He said community policing had helped defuse tensions between police and minorities and that last year marked the 12th consecutive year of crime reduction and the lowest murder rate in Dallas since 1930.

But his maverick officer said: 'He is grandstanding. He knows it is all about public perception.

'I don't want to besmirch the man and I have nothing personal against him. I harbor no anger at him.

'He says he wants to hug officers when he sees them. Well, I would hug him back I suppose.

'But I have no confidence in the man at all. He is very dictatorial. He is not open to questions. It is his show.'

The police chief has agreed that low starting salaries of his officers are a problem.

Salaries start at $44,659 for a police officer and go up to $96,170 for a lieutenant. The Dallas Police Department has more than 3500 sworn members and over 500 non-sworn members.

It polices 1.3million people in the city of 385 square miles and is actively seeking new recruits on its official website.

Novello said he joined the Dallas Police Department as a park and recreation officer.

In 2007, he made the transition to 'beat cop' patrolling East Dallas neighborhoods. He said he has no intention of climbing the ranks.

In the past Novello was spokesman for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, or LEAP, a group of current and former law enforcement members who say that existing drug policies have failed.

Daily Mail Online has reached out to Chief Brown's office for comment.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3686543/Veteran-Dallas-cop-breaks-ranks-slam-public-face-togetherness-claim-black-community-mistrusts-police-WRONGLY-arrested-help-arrest-quotas.html
 

Camille

Kitchen Wench #TeamTots #TeamQuaid
Staff member
The tweeter did a series of tweets in a thread. If you click on the first one the rest open below. I did a screenshot of the rest tho...



Protest1.jpg Protest2.jpg Protest3.jpg Protest4.jpg

#Maine
 
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