Who is Trump considering to replace Jeff Sessions ???

Discussion in 'Politics and the Topics of the day' started by MASTERBAKER, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

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    (Photo by Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Politicon)

    Report: Chris Christie being considered to replace Jeff Sessions
    NOVEMBER 08, 2018 - 10:14 AM

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    Politics


    WASHINGTON (1010 WINS) -- Reports say former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is being considered to fill Jeff Sessions' role as Attorney General.



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    Donald J. Trump

    ✔@realDonaldTrump

    · 22h

    We are pleased to announce that Matthew G. Whitaker, Chief of Staff to Attorney General Jeff Sessions at the Department of Justice, will become our new Acting Attorney General of the United States. He will serve our Country well....

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    Donald J. Trump

    ✔@realDonaldTrump


    ....We thank Attorney General Jeff Sessions for his service, and wish him well! A permanent replacement will be nominated at a later date.

    2:44 PM - Nov 7, 2018
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    CBS News reports Christie could get the gig after Sessions announced his resignation on Wednesday.

    RELATED: Jeff Sessions Fires Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe | Trump Says He Would ‘Love To’ Speak To Special Counsel Robert Mueller | Sources: Trump Mulls Firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein

    The president had apparently been angry with Sessions for recusing himself from the Russia investigation, which led to the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

    Instead of naming Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to replace Sessions on an interim basis, President Trump chose Sessions' Chief of Staff Matthew Whittaker.



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    Donald J. Trump

    ✔@realDonaldTrump



    We are pleased to announce that Matthew G. Whitaker, Chief of Staff to Attorney General Jeff Sessions at the Department of Justice, will become our new Acting Attorney General of the United States. He will serve our Country well....

    2:44 PM - Nov 7, 2018
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    Christie served as a U.S. attorney before being elected governor in New Jersey. He is a long time friend of President Trump.

    Whittaker is a person who has openly expressed concerns about the special counsel. Rod Rosenstein, the man he is replacing overseeing Mueller, has said time and again that Mueller is not on a witch hunt, and is by and large thought to have protected the special counsel.

    Whittaker released a statement saying he is committed to leading a fair department with the highest ethical standards that upholds the rule of law.

    It remains to be seen what kind of relationship Whittaker will have with Mueller.
     
  2. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    BREAKING: Donald Trump’s new acting attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, was involved in a company that scammed US military veterans out of their life savings, according to court filings and interviews.

    Whitaker, a former US attorney in Iowa, was paid to work as an advisory board member for World Patent Marketing (WPM), a Florida-based company accused by the US government of tricking aspiring inventors out of millions of dollars. Earlier this year, it was ordered to pay authorities $26m.

    Several veterans, two of them with disabilities, said they lost tens of thousands of dollars in the WPM scam, having been enticed into paying for patenting and licensing services by the impressive credentials of Whitaker and his fellow advisers.



    Trump's acting attorney general involved in firm that scammed veterans out of life savings
    • Matthew Whitaker was paid advisory board member for WPM
    • Veteran: ‘I spent the money on a dream. I lost everything’


    Jon Swaine in New York

    @jonswaine
    Fri 9 Nov 2018 17.14 ESTLast modified on Fri 9 Nov 2018 17.35 EST

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    Matthew Whitaker publicly vouched for WPM, claiming in December 2014 it went ‘beyond making statements about doing business ‘ethically’ and translate[d] those words into action.’ Photograph: Allison Shelley/Reuters
    Donald Trump’s new acting attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, was involved in a company that scammed US military veterans out of their life savings, according to court filings and interviews.

    Whitaker, a former US attorney in Iowa, was paid to work as an advisory board member for World Patent Marketing (WPM), a Florida-based company accused by the US government of tricking aspiring inventors out of millions of dollars. Earlier this year, it was ordered to pay authorities $26m.

    Several veterans, two of them with disabilities, said they lost tens of thousands of dollars in the WPM scam, having been enticed into paying for patenting and licensing services by the impressive credentials of Whitaker and his fellow advisers. None said they dealt with Whitaker directly.

    “World Patent Marketing has devastated me emotionally, mentally and financially,” Melvin Kiaaina, of Hawaii, told a federal court last year, adding that he trusted the firm with his life savings in part because it “had respected people on the board of directors”.

    The 60-year-old said he was a disabled veteran US army paratrooper and paid the company in 2015 and 2016 to patent and promote his ideas for fishing equipment.

    “I received nothing for the $14,085 I paid to the company, other than a bad quality drawing and logo that my grandson could have made,” he said.

    Kiaaina and other WPM customers described their experiences in declarations to court written under penalty of perjury, as part of a civil lawsuit brought by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) against WPM and its chief executive, Scott Cooper. Emails filed as evidence to the case showed desperate customers begging Cooper and his team for their money back.

    “You have caused me tremendous grief, I can’t sleep, my stress level is at an all-time high and the last of my savings has been stolen with nothing to show for it,” one unemployed widow, who lost $8,000, wrote to Cooper in December 2016. Another inventor who paid $12,000 said he was left with “a stress related condition that is eating away at my hair”.

    statement timed for Veterans Day 2014, which highlighted Whitaker’s role at the firm. WPM claimed to have made an unspecified donation to the Wounded Warrior Projectnonprofit, which did not respond to an email seeking confirmation of the payment.

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    Whitaker publicly vouched for WPM, claiming in a December 2014 statement it went “beyond making statements about doing business ‘ethically’ and translate[d] those words into action”.

    He said: “I would only align myself with a first-class organisation.”

    But customers reported to authorities that they had been treated unethically by a company that, beneath its glossy marketing pamphlets, was a shabby operation.

    Dennis Artman, a 24-year veteran of the army and air force reserves from Washington state, took $25,000 from his retirement savings account in 2015 to pay WPM to patent and promote a wearable device his then-wife had created to jolt sleepy drivers awake and guide them to accommodation.

    “He said, ‘I know it’s a lot of money but I believe in it and I believe in you,’” his ex-wife, Gwendolyn Artman, 58, said in an interview. Gwendolyn Artman said she received approximately 25 emails from WPM that touted the backgrounds of Whitaker and other board members.

    In late 2015, Artman said, WPM stopped returning her calls and emails. Only after she complained to the office of Florida’s attorney general did Cooper call – pleading with her to withdraw the complaint and promising to make amends. Again, nothing materialised.

    The Artmans divorced this year after more than 10 years of marriage. Gwendolyn, who runs a nonprofit treatment center for people suffering from opioid addiction, said the WPM saga was partly to blame.

    “I think he lost faith in me,” she said. “It was a lot of money, and he blamed me for losing it.”

    A justice department spokeswoman, Kerri Kupec, said in an email: “Acting attorney general Matt Whitaker has said he was not aware of any fraudulent activity. Any stories suggesting otherwise are false.”

    Attorneys for Cooper did not respond to emails seeking comment. Cooper denied wrongdoing in the FTC case. He was ultimately ordered to pay $1m and surrender any proceeds from selling his $3.5m mansion in Miami, in return for the rest of the $26m judgment being suspended.

    Some veterans who gave money to WPM said they were impressed by the inclusion on the advisory board of congressman Brian Mast, a Florida Republican who lost both his legs in a September 2010 bombing while serving with the army in Afghanistan.

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    One of these veterans, identified in court filings and company materials as “John D”, complained to Cooper that WPM had deserted him after using his status as a veteran to promote his idea for a new type of umbrella.

    “I’m sure he’ll be your best supporter,” John D wrote of Mast in a September 2016 email, “but what about my product?”

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    Masti told the court he lost more than $75,000. Photograph: Used with permission
    Mast, who was re-elected this week, said in a declaration to court that Cooper appointed him to the advisory board without his consent after the two met twice in February 2016, at an event and then at WPM’s offices in Miami. Last year he returned $5,400 in campaign donations given to him by Cooper.

    Another WPM client, Ryan Masti, who served in the navy and suffers from dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), said a WPM representative boasted of the company’s connections to Whitaker and Mast in a promotional telephone call that persuaded him to hand over money.

    Masti told the court he lost more than $75,000 after paying WPM to register, develop and promote his idea for “Socially Accepted”, a social network aimed at people with disabilities. He said that in return he received only a press release, a logo and a shoddy website template.

    “I spent the money on a dream to help people,” Masti said in an interview on Friday. “And I lost everything.”

    Masti, a 26-year-old farmer from upstate New York, borrowed $50,000 from his father’s retirement account, took out a commercial loan for about $20,000 and used another $7,000 he had inherited from his late grandfather, a veteran of the second world war. A WPM executive told him he “could make a million in sales” as a minimum, he said.

    Having voted for Trump enthusiastically in 2016, Masti said on Friday he would soon be changing his party affiliation to Democratic, following the president’s elevation of Whitaker.

    “It’s totally ridiculous,” said Masti. “It makes the whole Republican party look so bad. How could a president appoint someone like this? And then not have a problem about it when it comes out? He should be taking care of the victims.”
     
  3. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator


    Trump considering retired judge as attorney general



    upload_2018-11-11_16-31-10.jpeg

    BY ANITA KUMAR
    AND KEVIN G. HALL
    McClatchy DC
    akumar@mcclatchydc.com
    khall@mcclatchydc.com
    November 07, 2018

    WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is seriously considering naming Janice Rogers Brown, a retired D.C. circuit judge and former California Supreme Court justice who is well-liked in conservative circles, his next attorney general, according to a person familiar with the situation.

    Brown, who served alongside with now Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, has spoken to the White House about the job in recent weeks, even before Trump fired Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday. [b{Several conservative lawyers are recommending Brown,[/b] who is black. She stepped down last year after serving a dozen years.

    Sessions had long been a target of Trump’s ire for recusing himself from oversight of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Sessions had been a campaign adviser to Trump in 2016.

    Several other high-profile officials, including Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and retiring Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, have also been mentioned.

    Trump considered Kobach, architect of one of the nation’s toughest immigration laws, for various jobs at the start of his term but some aides did not think he could be confirmed by the Senate, where Republicans hold a slim majority.


    At a rally in Topeka earlier this year, Trump talked about his affection for Kobach, whom he endorsed for governor. “So a man that’s been with me from the beginning, he’s tough, he’s strong and I hated that he ran because I would have loved to have brought him into my administration, effectively loses, I’ll bring him into my administration in two seconds,” he said. “I hope he loses because I want him so badly. But don’t do that.”

    Trump appointed Kobach to lead his presidential commission into voter fraud, which was eventually disbanded after states refused to turn over data.

    Kobach’s campaign manager, J.R. Claeys, said Kobach, who lost his bid to become governor Tuesday, is “well suited” to become attorney general. “It does make complete sense,” Claeys said. “I haven’t had any discussions with him where this has come up... just knowing Kris as well as I do now, and knowing his history and knowing his relationship with the president and the trust he has from the president, I think it’s definitely a possibility.”

    Bondi, who is term-limited, will be replaced by former Hillsborough County Circuit Judge Ashley Moody, who was elected Tuesday. Her office declined to comment.

    Trump immediately named Matthew Whitaker, who had been Sessions’ chief of staff at the Justice Department and served as U.S. attorney in Iowa, as acting attorney general.

    Other names reportedly being mentioned for the permanent position include Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Transportation Department general counsel Steven Bradbury, former Attorney General Bill Barr, Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan.

    Retiring Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., Sen. Lindsay Graham, R-S.C., and Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, have said they do not want the job.

    Bryan Lowry and Hunter Woodall in Kansas City contributed.



    Read more here: https://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/justice/doj/article221308580.html#storylink=cpy
     
  4. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Trump reportedly lashed out at Whitaker over Cohen prosecution
    President Trump has at least twice vented his frustrations about the prosecution of his former personal attorney, Michael Cohen, at his acting attorney general, Matthew Whitaker, CNN reported Friday.

    The president is angry Cohen's case and revelations have shown him in poor light, CNN's sources said, and he asked Whitaker why he has not reined in prosecutors under his purview at the Department of Justice.

    Cohen has pleaded guilty to campaign finance violations and lying to Congress. Federal prosecutors said this month he has committed "serious crimes worthy of meaningful punishment."


    Source: CNN, The Hill

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