The Top 10 Non-Heavyweight Boxers

kes1111

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BGOL Investor
The Top 10 Non-Heavyweight Boxers (1970-Present)



Sugar Ray Leonard (born Ray Charles Leonard; May 17, 1956) is an American former professional boxer, motivational speaker, and occasional actor. He was the first boxer to earn more than $100 million in purses, won world titles in five weight divisions, and defeated future fellow International Boxing Hall of Fame inductees Wilfred Benítez, Thomas Hearns, Roberto Durán, and Marvin Hagler. He was named "Boxer of the Decade" in the 1980s. He was a 1973-74 National Golden Gloves Lightweight Champion,1975 Pan American Games Light Welterweight Gold Medalist,1976 Olympic Light Welterweight Gold Medalist. He finished his amateur career with a record of 145–5 and 75 KO's. He finished his pro career with a record of 36–3–1 with 25 knockouts.



Marvelous Marvin Hagler (born Marvin Nathaniel Hagler; May 23, 1954)[1] is an American former professional boxer who was Undisputed World Middleweight Champion from 1980 to 1987. Hagler made twelve undisputed title defenses and holds the highest KO% of all middleweight champions at 78%. At six years and seven months, his reign as undisputed middleweight champion is the second longest of the last century, behind only Tony Zale. Hagler is an inductee of the International Boxing Hall of Fame and the World Boxing Hall of Fame. Notable wins:Thomas Hearns,Roberto Durán,John Mugabi.



Roberto Durán Samaniego (born June 16, 1951) is a Panamanian former professional boxer, widely regarded as one of the greatest boxers of all time. A versatile brawler in the ring, he was nicknamed "Manos de Piedra" ("Hands of Stone") during his career. Many even consider him the greatest lightweight of all time. He held world titles at four different weights—lightweight (1972–79), welterweight (1980), light middleweight (1983–84) and middleweight (1989). He was the second boxer to have fought a span of five decades, the first being Jack Johnson. He finally retired in January 2002 at age 50 with a professional record of 120 fights, 104 wins with 69 KOs. Notable wins:Sugar Ray Leonard,Iran Barkley.



Thomas Hearns (born October 18, 1958) is an American former professional boxer. Nicknamed the "Motor City Cobra" and more famously "The Hitman," Hearns became the first boxer in history to win world titles in four divisions. He would also become the first fighter in history to win five world titles in five different divisions. Hearns was named fighter of the year by The Ring magazine in 1980 and 1984. In 1977, he won the National Amateur Athletic Union Light Welterweight Championship. He also won the 1977 National Golden Gloves Light Welterweight Championship. Hearns had an amateur record of 155–8. Professional boxing record 61 Wins (48 KOs), 5 Losses, 1 Draw.Notable wins: Wilfred Benítez,Roberto Durán,Virgil Hill.



Pernell Whitaker (born January 2, 1964 in Norfolk, Virginia), nicknamed "Sweet Pea," is a professional boxing trainer and retired American professional boxer. Whitaker was the lightweight silver medalist at the 1982 World Championships, followed by the gold medalist at the 1983 Pan American Games and the 1984 Olympics. Whitaker then embarked on a pro career in which he became world champion in four different weight divisions.For his achievements, he was named the 1989 Fighter of the year by Ring Magazine.
Whitaker is also a former WBA Light Middleweight Champion, WBC Welterweight Champion, IBF Light Welterweight Champion, WBC, WBA & IBF Lightweight Champion and NABF Lightweight Champion. He is universally heralded as one of the top 5 lightweights of all time. Ring Magazine ranked him at number 10 in their list of 'The 100 Greatest Fighters of the Last 80 Years.' On December 7, 2006, Whitaker was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame, in his first year of eligibility.Whitaker had an extensive amateur boxing career, having started at the age of nine. He had 214 amateur fights, winning 201, 91 of them by knockouts.He finished his professional career with an official record of 40-4-1 (17 knockouts). Notable wins:Greg Haugen,Azumah Nelson,James McGirt.



Héctor Luís Camacho Matías (May 24, 1962 – November 24, 2012),nicknamed Macho Camacho, was a Puerto Rican professional boxer and singer. Known for his quickness in the ring and flamboyant style,he held major championships in the super featherweight (WBC, 1983), lightweight (WBC, 1985), and junior welterweight (WBO, 1989 and 1991) divisions. After earning minor titles in four additional weight classes, Camacho became the first boxer to be recognized as a septuple champion. As an amateur, Camacho won three New York Golden Gloves Championships. Camacho won the 1978 112 lb Sub-Novice Championship, 1979 118 lb Open Championship, and 1980 119 lb Open Championship.His professional record stands at 79 wins (45 by KO), 6 losses, and 3 draws.Notable wins:Roberto Durán2x, Sugar Ray Leonard, Ray Mancini.



Julio César Chávez González (July 12, 1962) is a retired Mexican professional boxer. He is considered by acclamation as the greatest Mexican fighter of all time and as one of the best boxers of all time.
Chávez is a six-time world champion in three weight divisions, and for several years he was considered the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world.In a career that spanned over 25 years, Chávez won the WBC Super Featherweight in 1984, WBA Lightweight in 1987, WBC Lightweight in 1988, WBC Light Welterweight in 1989, IBF Light Welterweight in 1990, and WBC Light Welterweight in 1994.
He holds records for most successful defenses of world titles (27), most title fight victories (31), most title fights (37), and he is after Joe Louis (with 23) for most title defenses won by knockout (21). Chávez also has the longest undefeated streak in boxing history, 13 years.Chávez finally retired in his 25th year as a professional boxer with a record of 107 wins, 6 losses and 2 draws, with 86 knockouts. Notable wins:Meldrick Taylor2x,Hector Camacho,Greg Haugen.



Bernard Humphrey Hopkins, Jr. (born January 15, 1965) is an American boxer who was a world middleweight titlist from 1994 until 2005, unifying and successfuly defended his title a record 20 times. He won the International Boxing Federation title in 1994, then added the World Boxing Council, World Boxing Association, and The Ring titles in 2001 and became the first man to hold all four major sanctioning bodies' titles when he won the World Boxing Organization title in 2004. The Ring ranked him #3 on their list of the "10 best middleweight title holders of the last 50 years." Hopkins moved up to light heavyweight and won the Ring and International Boxing Organization titles from Antonio Tarver at 42 years of age, making two defenses of the Ring title before losing it to Joe Calzaghe. Three years later, Hopkins defeated Jean Pascal for the WBC title and broke George Foreman's record for oldest fighter to ever win a world championship at the age of 46. Hopkins later broke his own record by winning the IBF title from Tavoris Cloud in 2013 and again in 2014 when he won the WBA title from Beibut Shumenov, aged 48 and 49 respectively. Professional boxing record 55 Wins (32 knockouts), 7 Losses, 2 Draws, 2 No Contests. Notable wins:Roy Jones, Jr.,Oscar De La Hoya,Antonio Tarver,Kelly Pavlik,Félix Trinidad.



Floyd Mayweather, Jr. (born Floyd Joy Sinclair, February 24, 1977) is an American professional boxer. He is undefeated as a professional and is a five-division world champion, having won eleven world titles and the lineal championship in four different weight classes. Mayweather is a two-time Ring magazine Fighter of the Year (winning the award in 1998 and 2007); he also won the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) Fighter of the Year award in 2007 and the Best Fighter ESPY Award in 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2013, and 2014.
Mayweather is the WBC, WBA, WBO and Ring welterweight champion, and the WBC Super, WBA, and Ring junior middle weight champion. He is also rated as the best pound-for-pound boxer in the world by many sporting news and boxing websites, including Ring, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, BoxRec, Fox Sports, and Yahoo! Sports. Mayweather had an amateur record of 84–6 and won national Golden Gloves championships in 1993 (at 106 lb), 1994 (at 114 lb), and 1996 (at 125 lb). At the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Mayweather won a bronze medal by reaching the semi-finals of the featherweight (57-kg) division. Professional boxing record 48 Wins (26 knockouts, 22 decisions), 0 Losses, 0 Draws. Notable wins: Manny Pacquiao, Oscar De La Hoya, Miguel Cotto.



Emmanuel "Manny" Dapidran Pacquiao, PLH (born December 17, 1978), is a Filipino world champion professional boxer. He is the first and only eight-division world champion,in which he has won ten world titles, as well as the first to win the lineal championship in four different weight classes. He was named "Fighter of the Decade" for the 2000s (decade) by the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA), World Boxing Council (WBC) and World Boxing Organization (WBO). He is also a three-time The Ring and BWAA "Fighter of the Year," winning the award in 2006, 2008, and 2009, and the Best Fighter ESPY Award in 2009 and 2011.He is currently ranked number five on the Ring and the longest reigning top-10 on the pound-for-pound list. Pacquiao reportedly had an amateur record of 64 fights (60–4). Professional boxing record 57 Wins (38 knockouts, 19 decisions), 6 Losses (3 knockouts, 3 decisions), 2 Draws. Notable wins: Oscar De La Hoya, Miguel Cotto,Shane Mosley.

The Top 10 Heavyweight Boxers
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Upgrade Dave

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Having beaten his 5th (probably 6th depending on how Canelo pans out) Hall of Famer, and again beating a top 5 p4p fighter, I have Floyd leapfrogging everyone but Leonard on this list.
 

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No Ricardo Lopez, Roy Jones (fuck that one fight at heavyweight), no James Toney, no Joe Calzaghe :confused:

Biased list in my opinion.. I'll bet the writer is at least 45-50 :hmm:

I also think this list is the first salvo which will define how Floyds career will be defined once he retires in a lot of circles.

Not saying I agree with it, but I can see the logic used:

Quality of opposition
Fighting fighters in their primes
Fighters he didn't fight and should have
The way he wins fights
the 'Hate' Factor

Unfortunately for Floyd, he was so much better than the fighters he faced, he made the fights appear easy and thus, negates the quality of fighters he beat.

He fought Oscar and Mosely when they were past their primes, so from a historical context, that will 'lessen' the quality of the wins against arguably the biggest names he faced

Whether its true or not, I believe there is a stained perception that he handpicked fighters whose style best suited his

There will also be the 'hate' factor because so many people, especially in the media want to see him lose, which when he doesn't, lists like this gives them a chance to still beat him.

Now that I think about it, this probably explains Roys exclusion from the list... Not sure Camacho rates either... :hmm:

Side note... Shit, I'd change my last name to Mayweather if it was legally Sinclair too! Pops was bugging, last name already Sinclair and you give your son the Middle name 'Joy' :lol:
 
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SmoothD

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I'd remove Pernell Whitaker and replace him with Aaron Pryor
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Pipe

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Camacho doesn't belong anywhere near that list.

RJJ and Finito definitely got screwed.
 

Pipe

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Fiiiiine.... Since wanna keep re-quoting me. Here is my top 10: (You will definitely not see that Puerto Rican titty-shaker that you keep posting)


Note: I left Ezzard Charles and Archie Moore off of this list because they competed at heavyweight. They would have made the list otherwise.

1. Sugar Ray Robinson


Robinson was a dominant amateur, but his exact amateur record is not known. It is usually listed as 85–0 with 69 knockouts, 40 in the first round. However it has been reported he lost to Billy Graham and Patsy Pesca as a teenager under his given name, Walker Smith Jr. He turned professional in 1940 at the age of 19 and by 1951 had a professional record of 128–1–2 with 84 knockouts. From 1943 to 1951 Robinson went on a 91-fight unbeaten streak, the third-longest in professional boxing history.[2][3] Robinson held the world welterweight title from 1946 to 1951, and won the world middleweight title in the latter year. He retired in 1952, only to come back two-and-a-half years later and regain the middleweight title in 1955. He then became the first boxer in history to win a divisional world championship five times (a feat he accomplished by defeating Carmen Basilio in 1958 to regain the middleweight championship). Robinson was named "fighter of the year" twice: first for his performances in 1942, then nine years and over 90 fights later, for his efforts in 1951. Historian Bert Sugar ranked Robinson as the greatest fighter of all time and in 2002, Robinson was also ranked number one on The Ring magazine's list of "80 Best Fighters of the Last 80 Years".[4] As of October 2020, BoxRec ranks Robinson as the fourth greatest boxer, pound-for-pound, of all time.[5]
Renowned for his classy and flamboyant lifestyle outside the ring,[6] Robinson is credited with being the originator of the modern sports "entourage". After his boxing career ended, Robinson attempted a career as an entertainer, but it was not successful. He struggled financially until his death in 1989. In 2006, he was featured on a commemorative stamp by the United States Postal Service.[7]



2. Henry Armstrong


Henry Jackson Jr. (December 12, 1912 – October 24, 1988) was an American professional boxer and a world boxing champion who fought under the name Henry Armstrong.
Armstrong was one of the few fighters to win in three or more different divisions: featherweight, lightweight, and welterweight. He defended his welterweight title a total of nineteen times.
The Ring magazine named him Fighter of the Year in 1937. The Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) named him Fighter of the Year in 1940. He is currently ranked by BoxRec as the 12th greatest pound-for-pound fighter of all time.[1] In 2007, The Ring ranked Armstrong as the second-greatest fighter of the last 80 years.[2] Historian Bert Sugar also ranked Armstrong as the second-greatest fighter of all time. ESPN ranked Armstrong as number 3 on their list of the 50 greatest boxers of all time.[3]

3. Roberto Duran


Roberto Durán Samaniego (born June 16, 1951) is a Panamanian former professional boxer who competed from 1968 to 2001. He held world championships in four weight classes: lightweight, welterweight, light middleweight and middleweight, as well as reigns as the undisputed and lineal lightweight champion, and the lineal welterweight champion.[1] He is also the second boxer to have competed over a span of five decades, the first being Jack Johnson. Durán was known as a versatile, technical brawler and pressure fighter, which earned him the nickname of "Manos de Piedra" ("Hands of Stone") for his formidable punching power and excellent defense.[2]
In 2002, Durán was voted by The Ring magazine as the fifth greatest fighter of the last 80 years,[3] while boxing historian Bert Sugar rated him as the eighth greatest fighter of all time. The Associated Press voted him as the best lightweight of the 20th century,[4] with many considering him the greatest lightweight of all time. Durán retired for good in January 2002 at age 50, following a car crash in Argentina in October 2001, after which he had required life saving surgery. He had previously retired in November 1980, June 1984 and August 1998, only to change his mind. Durán ended his career with a professional record of 119 fights, 103 wins, and 70 knockouts. From May 1971 up until his second fight against Sugar Ray Leonard in November 1980, as well as in his fight against Wilfred Benítez in January 1982, Durán was trained by legendary boxing trainer Ray Arcel.

4. Willie Pep


Guglielmo Papaleo (September 19, 1922 – November 23, 2006) was an American professional boxer, better known as Willie Pep who held the World Featherweight championship twice between the years of 1942 and 1950. Pep boxed a total of 1,956 rounds in the 241 bouts during his 26-year career, a considerable number of rounds and bouts even for a fighter of his era. His final record was 229–11–1 with 65 knockouts. Pep, known for his speed, finesse and elusiveness, is considered to be one of the best fighters of the 20th century; after his 199th win, Kid Campeche described his experience by saying, "Fighting Willie Pep is like trying to stomp out a grass fire."[1] Pep was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990. Pep was voted as the No. 1 featherweight of the 20th century by the Associated Press[2] and ranked the No. 1 featherweight of all-time by the International Boxing Research Organization in 2005.[3] He is currently ranked by BoxRec as the 31st greatest pound-for-pound fighter of all time.[4] BoxRec also gave 10 of his victorious fights a 5-Star rating.

5. Harry Greb


Edward Henry "Harry" Greb (June 6, 1894 – October 22, 1926) was an American professional boxer. Nicknamed "The Pittsburgh Windmill", he is widely regarded by many boxing historians as one of the best pound for pound boxers of all time.
He was the American light heavyweight champion from 1922 to 1923 and world middleweight champion from 1923 to 1926. He fought a recorded 298 times in his 13 year-career, which began at around 140 pounds. He fought against the best opposition the talent-rich 1910s and 20s could provide him and despite starting as a welterweight, he was frequently squaring off against and beating light heavyweights and even heavyweights.
Greb had a highly aggressive, very fast, swarming style of fighting and buried his opponents under a blizzard of punches. He was elusive with very good footwork to jump in and out on opponents. He was also a master at dirty fighting and had no qualms about employing all manner of dubious tactics, such as spinning his opponent and using the heel and laces of his gloves.[1] Greb often got as much as he gave and unbeknownst to the press continued to fight a number of matches even as he became blind in one eye, due to an injury suffered in an earlier match. The 'Pittsburgh Windmill' was also very durable, suffering only 2 TKO losses in his whole career. The first was in his seventh bout when he was knocked out by an opponent who heavily outweighed him, the second happened 3 years later when Greb broke the radius of his left arm. Greb finished the round but was unable to continue the fight.[2] Greb's ultimate weakness may have been his lack of knockout power; although he was able to hurt and bust up many opponents due to the constant onslaught of clean punches he landed on them, he struggled to stop them but this mostly due to the fact that his opponents were much larger than him. He launched a vicious beating on the much larger Tunney on two occasions, cutting him and hurting him badly, but was unable to knock him out both times. It was the same process with many opponents.
Widely considered one of the best fighters of all time, Greb is currently ranked by BoxRec as the 9th greatest fighter of all time. Greb was also named the 7th greatest fighter of the past 80 years by the Ring Magazine, the 5th greatest fighter of all-time by historian Bert Sugar, the 4th greatest fighter of all-time by historian and boxing commentator Max Kellerman and ranked as the #1 middleweight and the #2 pound-for-pound fighter of all-time by the International Boxing Research Organization.[3][4][5][6]


6. Roy Jones Jr.


Roy Levesta Jones Jr. (born January 16, 1969) is an American former professional boxer, boxing commentator, boxing trainer, rapper, and actor who holds dual American and Russian citizenship.[1] He competed in boxing from 1989 to 2018, and held multiple world championships in four weight classes, including titles at middleweight, super middleweight, light heavyweight, and heavyweight, and is the only boxer in history to start his professional career at light middleweight and go on to win a heavyweight title. As an amateur, he represented the United States at the 1988 Summer Olympics, winning a silver medal in the light middleweight division after one of the most controversial decisions in boxing history.[2][3]
Jones is considered by many to be one of the best boxers of all time, pound for pound, and left his mark in the sport's history when he won the WBA heavyweight title in 2003, becoming the first former middleweight champion to win a heavyweight title in 106 years. In 1999 he became the undisputed light heavyweight champion by unifying the WBA, WBC, and IBF titles. During his prime, Jones was known for possessing exceptional hand speed, athleticism, movement and reflexes.
As of February 2018, Jones holds the record for the most wins in unified light heavyweight title bouts in boxing history, at twelve. He is ranked by BoxRec as the 17th greatest pound-for-pound fighter of all time.[4] Ten of his victorious fights received a 5-Star rating from BoxRec. The Ring magazine named Jones the Fighter of the Year in 1994, and the World Boxing Hall of Fame named him the Fighter of the Year for 2003. He is also a three-time winner of the Best Boxer ESPY Award (1996, 2000, and 2003). The Boxing Writers Association of America named him as the Fighter of the Decade for the 1990s.

7. Sugar Ray Leonard


Ray Charles Leonard (born May 17, 1956), best known as "Sugar" Ray Leonard, is an American former professional boxer, motivational speaker, and occasional actor. Often regarded as one of the greatest boxers of all time, he competed from 1977 to 1997, winning world titles in five weight divisions; the lineal championship in three weight divisions;[3] as well as the undisputed welterweight title.[4] Leonard was part of "The Fabulous Four",[5] a group of boxers who all fought each other throughout the 1980s, consisting of Leonard, Roberto Durán, Thomas Hearns, and Marvin Hagler.
"The Fabulous Four" created a wave of popularity in the lower weight classes that kept boxing relevant in the post–Muhammad Ali era, during which Leonard defeated future fellow International Boxing Hall of Fame inductees Hearns, Durán, Hagler, and Wilfred Benítez.[6][7] Leonard was also the first boxer to earn more than $100 million in purses, and was named "Boxer of the Decade" in the 1980s.[8] The Ring magazine named him Fighter of the Year in 1979 and 1981, while the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA) named him Fighter of the Year in 1976, 1979, and 1981. In 2002, Leonard was voted by The Ring as the ninth greatest fighter of the last 80 years;[9] BoxRec ranks him as the 23rd greatest boxer of all time, pound for pound.[10]


8. Pernell Whitaker


Pernell Whitaker Sr.[1] (January 2, 1964 – July 14, 2019)[2] was an American professional boxer who competed from 1984 to 2001, and subsequently worked as a boxing trainer. He was a four-weight world champion, having won titles at lightweight, light welterweight, welterweight, and light middleweight; the undisputed lightweight title; and the lineal lightweight and welterweight titles.[3] In 1989, Whitaker was named Fighter of the Year by The Ring magazine and the Boxing Writers Association of America. He currently holds the longest unified lightweight championship reign in boxing history at six title defenses. Whitaker is generally regarded as one of the greatest defensive boxers of all-time.[4]
As an amateur, Whitaker won a silver medal in the lightweight division at the 1982 World Championships, followed by gold at the 1983 Pan American Games and 1984 Olympics. After his retirement in 2001, Whitaker returned to the sport as a trainer. In 2002, The Ring ranked him tenth in their list of "The 100 Greatest Fighters of the Last 80 Years". In 2006, Whitaker was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame, in his first year of eligibility.

9. Andre Ward


Andre Michael Ward (born February 23, 1984) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 2004 to 2017. He retired with an undefeated record and held multiple world titles in two weight classes, including the unified WBA (Super), WBC, Ring magazine, and lineal super middleweight titles between 2009 and 2015; and the unified WBA (Super), IBF, WBO, and Ring light heavyweight titles between 2016 and 2017. During his reign as light heavyweight champion, Ward was ranked as the world's best active boxer, pound for pound, by The Ring magazine and the Transnational Boxing Rankings Board (TBRB), as well as the world's best active boxer in the division by The Ring, the TBRB, and BoxRec. As of January 2021, BoxRec ranks Ward as the tenth greatest fighter of all time, pound for pound.[1] Eight of his victorious fights received a 5-Star rating from BoxRec.
As an amateur, Ward won a gold medal in the light heavyweight division at the 2004 Olympics and turned professional later that year. He rose to worldwide prominence upon entering the Super Six World Boxing Classic tournament in 2009, where he won the WBA (Super) super middleweight title from Mikkel Kessler in the opening group stage. In 2011, Ward defeated WBC champion Carl Froch in the tournament final to unify the titles, as well as winning the vacant Ring and lineal titles. That same year, Ward was named Fighter of the Year by The Ring and the Boxing Writers' Association of America. He later won The Ring's Comeback of the Year award in 2016 following a long period of sporadic in-ring activity between 2012 and 2015. Ward was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2021, his first year of eligibility.[2]


10. Manny Pacquiao


Emmanuel "Manny" Dapidran Pacquiao, CLH (/ˈpækiaʊ/ PAK-ee-ow; born December 17, 1978) is a Filipino professional boxer and politician who is currently serving as a Senator of the Philippines and as party president of the PDP–Laban party. Nicknamed "PacMan", he is regarded as one of the greatest professional boxers of all time.[5]
Manny Pacquiao is the only eight-division world champion in the history of boxing and has won twelve major world titles.[6][7] He was the first boxer to win the lineal championship in five different weight classes,[8][9][10] the first boxer to win major world titles in four of the eight "glamour divisions": flyweight, featherweight, lightweight, and welterweight,[11][12][13] and is the only boxer to hold world championships across four decades (1990s, 2000s, 2010s, and 2020s).[14]
As of 2015, Pacquiao's fights had generated $1.2 billion in revenue from his 25 pay-per-view bouts.[15] According to Forbes, he was the second highest paid athlete in the world in 2015.[16]
In July 2019, Pacquiao became the oldest welterweight world champion in history at the age of 40,[17] and the first boxer in history to become a recognized four-time welterweight champion after defeating Keith Thurman to win the WBA (Super) welterweight title.[18]
Pacquiao has held the WBA (Super) welterweight title since July 2019. As of November 2020, he is ranked as the world's eighth best active boxer, pound-for-pound, by BoxRec, ninth by Boxing Writers Association of America and tenth by ESPN. He is also ranked as the world's third best active welterweight by the Transnational Boxing Rankings Board, Espn, The Ring Magazine and BoxRec.
 
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