2018 Midterms Over; SHOTS FIRED !!!

Discussion in 'Politics and the Topics of the day' started by MASTERBAKER, Jul 19, 2018.

  1. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  2. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    Barack Obama and Joe Biden made a surprise visit to a Washington DC bakery Monday. "We were absolutely stunned to see them! We had no idea they were coming,” Lolly Rivas of Dog Tag Bakery told CNN.

    Their order? Ham and gruyere on shallot-jam ciabatta, a slice of mint-basil blueberry cake, brownies and coffee, Rivas said. https://cnn.it/2K8NPvW

     
  3. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Should Democrats stop driving themselves crazy about an "identity crisis" that is supposedly bogging down the party as it heads into the height of the 2018 midterm campaign season ???

    With ongoing debates about what the party should stand for -- the Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wing or the Conor Lamb wing -- should the major focus for every Democratic candidate be on the giant elephant on the campaign trail: Donald Trump ???
    With someone as divisive and polarizing as Trump, don't Democrats already have the issue which every candidate and voter can rally around: -- Trump and his right/far-right agenda ???


    .
     
  4. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Polls show several key Senate races are deadlocked

    Several critical Senate races are still up in the air, four national polls unveiled Wednesday reveal. Democrats are vying to hold on to 10 Senate seats that are possibly at risk, and want to flip two others to gain a majority, but key races remain close. In Texas, Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D) leads Sen. Ted Cruz (R) by two percent, the poll found. In Arizona, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) is three points ahead of Rep. Martha McSally (R), as both lawmakers seek to replace the retiring Sen. Jeff Flake (R). Races in Florida and Nevada lean toward Republicans, but only by one and three points, respectively. Because of polling margins of error, the competitive races are essentially tied, with less than seven weeks until the midterm elections.

    Source: Reuters
     
  5. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  6. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    The Midterm Election— just 7 weeks, 35 days from today.
     
  7. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    WARNING:

    Poll: Republicans close enthusiasm gap with Democrats amid Kavanaugh fight

    With the 2018 midterms less than five weeks away, Republican voters have caught up with Democrats in viewing the election as "very important," according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. In July, the same poll registered a 10-point enthusiasm gap, and while Democrats and Republicans are both more juiced to vote, Democrats now lead by a 2-point margin, 82 percent to 80 percent. The result of the Senate's Brett Kavanaugh hearing, "at least in the short run, is the Republican base was awakened," says Marist's Lee Miringoff. FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver says the polling is more nuanced, but there's been a slight uptick in the GOP's Senate fortunes while their chances of keeping the House continue to fall.


    Source: NPR, FiveThirtyEight.


    .
     
  8. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    WARNING:

    Poll: Republicans close enthusiasm gap with Democrats amid Kavanaugh fight

    With the 2018 midterms less than five weeks away, Republican voters have caught up with Democrats in viewing the election as "very important," according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. In July, the same poll registered a 10-point enthusiasm gap, and while Democrats and Republicans are both more juiced to vote, Democrats now lead by a 2-point margin, 82 percent to 80 percent. The result of the Senate's Brett Kavanaugh hearing, "at least in the short run, is the Republican base was awakened," says Marist's Lee Miringoff. FiveThirtyEight's Nate Silver says the polling is more nuanced, but there's been a slight uptick in the GOP's Senate fortunes while their chances of keeping the House continue to fall.


    Source: NPR, FiveThirtyEight.


    .
     
  9. BIGDAWG

    BIGDAWG New Member

    The DEMS are going to lose this battle but they need to focus on winning the war.

    They need to find a charismatic candidate to run against Trump and they need to find him/her ASAP or just call it a wrap.

    With two years left to he next White House run, they better hurry because I don't really see anyone strong enough to whip him now.

    Someone who can draw out the female vote is probably the best way to go.

    Otherwise, fugeddabouddit.
     
  10. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Sound Advice!!!

    .
     
  11. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Wishfully thinking . . .

    [​IMG]
    David Fitzsimmons Copyright 2018 Cagle Cartoons
     
  12. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator


    Four weeks out from the midterm elections, every Democrat, Democratic-leaning independent, and opponent of President Trump and the GOP needs to learn a very simple civics lesson:


    Protesting with likeminded partisans may feel good.

    Angrily pounding on the door of the Supreme Court may bring a moment or two of satisfaction.


    Swearing up a storm on Twitter about the evils of Republican rule may inspire a passing thrill.

    But none of this will do a thing to change the political dynamic in the country if it isn't followed up by Democratic voters getting themselves to the polls en masse on Election Day.

    Voting is the only political act that really matters now.

    [​IMG]

    http://theweek.com/articles/800706/what-democrats-must
    .
     
  13. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    FIRED UP
    Voter turnout in the upcoming midterms may be the highest in 50 years


    8:04a.m.
    [​IMG]
    Jessica McGowan / Getty Images

    Turnout for the last midterm elections was embarrassingly poor, but this year, things are looking different.


    As early voting surges in some states, election expert Michael McDonald told Talking Points Memo Friday he's predicting a turnout of between 45 and 50 percent of eligible voters. That would be the highest figure since at least 1970, when turnout hit 47 percent, and could possibly be the highest since 1966, when turnout was 49 percent, NPR reports.

    This is a significant turnaround from the 2014 midterms, when just 36 percent of eligible voters cast ballots, the worst showing since World War II, per PBS. The 2018 upswing isn't entirely surprising, though, considering turnout was also way up in primary elections earlier this year; about 37 million people participated in House primaries, compared to 24 million four years ago, Pew Research Center reports.

    Early voting has already hit very high numbers in several states, from Georgiato Tennessee and Kansas. McDonald told TPM that the data he's seeing so far is "very unusual," especially in Georgia, where three times as many people have cast their ballots than did by this point in 2014. He added, "I've never seen anything like this." Brendan Morrow


    .
     
  14. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator




    The Biggest Story of the Midterms Is One the Democrats Aren’t Telling

    Things are looking up for progressives at the state level—but until recently, the national party wasn’t spreading the word.

    6:00 AM ET
    Rahm Emanuel
    44th mayor of Chicago



    [​IMG]
    Barack Obama at a campaign rally for Wisconsin Democratic candidates (the gubernatorial candidate Tony
    Evers, the lieutenant-governor candidate Mandela Barnes, and the state-treasurer candidate Sarah Godlewski) on
    October 26Sara Stathas / Reuters


    Here’s the real news of the 2018 midterm elections. One week out, Democrats appear poised to win big on two of the three big playing fields. They were never going to retake the Senate, if only because of the mix of seats up for election this year—10 of those held by Democrats are in states Donald Trump carried in 2016. But in the House of Representatives and in state houses around the country, Democrats are on the verge of scoring huge victories. Given the underlying economic reality, that’s entirely unexpected.

    It’s a story the Democratic National Committee has, until recently, utterly failed to tell. Until recently, the DNC was focused almost exclusively on the battle for Congress. I’m glad it has finally taken notice of the fact that 36 states are holding gubernatorial contests this year and that Democrats are likely to flip many of the most important state houses from red to blue. But from a strategic standpoint, it’s been very late to the game—although it’s better to be late than sorry.

    Nowhere is it written that the president’s party is guaranteed to lose big in a midterm election. In fact, when the economy is good, the party controlling the White House has a huge advantage. Democrats picked up five congressional seats in 1998, when President Bill Clinton was in office and the middle class was thriving. Good policy drives good politics.


    But we know the flip side as well. When the American people think the economy’s headed in the wrong direction, they’re liable to punish the president’s allies across the country. That’s what happened in 1982, 1994, and 2006. And that’s why it’s so remarkable that Republicans are struggling one week out from this year’s midterm.

    If a political pundit arrived on the scene today not knowing anything about the past two years in politics, she’d likely look at the economic indicators and presume that the GOP was flying high. But President Trump’s divisive social agenda and pugnacious personality are so unpopular that he’s dragging his entire party down with him. Republicans are hemorrhaging mea culpa voters who regret having voted for Trump in the first place. And that will cost the GOP not just in House races, but also in state houses across the country.


    What’s a wave election? It’s a force within the electorate that proves more powerful than the structural impediments it overwhelms. The barriers to Democratic success are formidable, including voter suppression, gerrymandering, and a 3.7 percent unemployment rate. But Democrats are seeing their support swell high enough that it’s likely to overtop those barriers, not because of the economy but in spite of it.


    No Democrat needs to be reminded why statewide elections in places like Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin matter in presidential campaigns. But until now, the DNC has seemed intent on letting everyone ignore the GOP’s biggest vulnerability, namely the fact that those three states—not to mention swing states like Florida, Ohio, Iowa, and Minnesota—are electing governors next week. If Democrats end up flipping state houses in places Trump won in 2016, they will have proved themselves capable of winning in the places coastal elites derisively refer to as “flyover America.” You can’t overstate how big a deal that will be.


    It’s not that power in Congress isn’t important—it is. But over the long haul, the gubernatorial contests are likely to have a much bigger impact for three reasons. First, swing-state Democratic governors will have road-tested the messages best equipped to sway voters in the most important swing states. Nothing could be more valuable for our 2020 nominee.

    Second, across most of the country, state officials will soon be tasked with redrawing the nation’s congressional districts. A decade ago, Republican governors helped the GOP gerrymander itself a decade’s worth of political advantage in Washington. If Democrats do well this year and again in 2020, they’ll be poised to flip that advantage back on the GOP through 2030.

    Read: Young people might actually turn out for the midterms

    Finally, in close presidential elections, a state’s political apparatus can have an outsize impact. Who knows how the 2016 campaign would have turned out if Democratic governors had controlled Michigan and Wisconsin, places where Hillary Clinton lost by three-tenths and seven-tenths of a point, respectively? Our country might be in a very different place today.


    Republican operatives and elected officials are quietly working to suppress (mostly minority) voters in battleground states. And the GOP base is unusually energized, meaning that any blue wave will almost certainly be countered on the margins by a red undertow. Many of these races will come down to the wire.

    But none of that should obscure the bigger picture. We’re on the verge of watching the American people repudiate a sitting president despite a nominally strong economy. That’s exceedingly rare. Democrats are proving they can win swing voters, and are well on their way to establishing one of the strongest benches they’ve had in decades. Things are looking up for progressives. If Democrats manage to win two of the nation’s three battlegrounds next week, they’ll have had a huge night. Once the results are in, don’t let anybody convince you otherwise.

    We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.



    READERS BEWARE - THIS WAS WRITTEN BY: Rahm Emanuel is the 44th mayor of Chicago. He previously served as President Obama’s chief of staff and as chairman of both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the House Democratic Caucus.


    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/a...could-win-some-huge-midterm-victories/574282/


    .
     
  15. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Trump shocks with racist new ad days before midterms


    Updated 7:42 AM EDT November 1, 2018

    In the most racially charged national political ad in 30 years, President Donald Trump and the Republican Party accuse Democrats of plotting to help people they depict as Central American invaders overrun the nation with cop killers.

    The new web video, tweeted by the President five days before the midterm elections, is the most extreme step yet in the most inflammatory closing argument of any campaign in recent memory.

    The Trump campaign ad is the latest example of the President's willingness to lie and fear-monger in order to tear at racial and societal divides; to embrace demagoguery to bolster his own political power and the cause of the Republican midterm campaign.

    The web video — produced for the Trump campaign — features Luis Bracamontes, a Mexican man who had previously been deported but returned to the United States and was convicted in February in the slaying of two California deputies.

    "I'm going to kill more cops soon," a grinning Bracamontes is shown saying in court as captions flash across the screen reading "Democrats let him into our country. Democrats let him stay."

    The ad recalls the notorious "Willie Horton" campaign ad financed by supporters of the George H.W. Bush campaign in the 1988 presidential election. Horton was a convicted murderer who committed rape while furloughed under a program in Massachusetts where Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis was governor.

    The ad has since come to be seen as one of the most racially problematic in modern political history since it played into white fear and African-American stereotypes. It was regarded at the time as devastating to the Dukakis campaign.
    Updated 7:42 AM EDT November 1, 2018

    In the most racially charged national political ad in 30 years, President Donald Trump and the Republican Party accuse Democrats of plotting to help people they depict as Central American invaders overrun the nation with cop killers.

    The new web video, tweeted by the President five days before the midterm elections, is the most extreme step yet in the most inflammatory closing argument of any campaign in recent memory.

    The Trump campaign ad is the latest example of the President's willingness to lie and fear-monger in order to tear at racial and societal divides; to embrace demagoguery to bolster his own political power and the cause of the Republican midterm campaign.

    The web video — produced for the Trump campaign — features Luis Bracamontes, a Mexican man who had previously been deported but returned to the United States and was convicted in February in the slaying of two California deputies.

    "I'm going to kill more cops soon," a grinning Bracamontes is shown saying in court as captions flash across the screen reading "Democrats let him into our country. Democrats let him stay."

    The ad recalls the notorious "Willie Horton" campaign ad financed by supporters of the George H.W. Bush campaign in the 1988 presidential election. Horton was a convicted murderer who committed rape while furloughed under a program in Massachusetts where Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis was governor.

    The ad has since come to be seen as one of the most racially problematic in modern political history since it played into white fear and African-American stereotypes. It was regarded at the time as devastating to the Dukakis campaign.
     
  16. michigantoga

    michigantoga Well-Known Member BGOL Investor

    Yup, he got a playing going on with small children right now becoming US Citizens
     
  17. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  18. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  19. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

  20. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

  21. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  22. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    "It may not be a blue wave, it's a rainbow wave,"


    "It may not be a blue wave, it's a rainbow wave," says CNN's Van Jones, describing what he sees as the beginning of a new Democratic party — "younger, browner, cooler, more women, more veterans..."

     
  23. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    ELECTION NIGHT 2018: ABC News is on the ground across the country with continuous coverage as voters head to the polls. Latest updates: abcnews.com/politics
     
  24. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    I need a cigarette just thinking about it.

    [​IMG]
     
  25. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Trump REACTS to midterm elections results on Twitter after House of Representatives losses
    [​IMG]

    Donald Trump takes to twitter to thank supporters (Image: GETTY)

    DONALD TRUMP gave a very positive spin to the midterm election results, despite news the Democrats are likely to take control of the House of Representatives.


    The President said on Twitter: “Tremendous success tonight. Thank you to all!”

    He followed this up with a steady stream of messages lauding his party and himself, dashing the hopes of anyone who thought the loss of the House might prompt him to adopt a more conciliatory tone. He wrote;


    “Received so many Congratulations from so many on our Big Victory last night, including from foreign nations (friends) that were waiting me out, and hoping, on Trade Deals. Now we can all get back to work and get things done!

    “Those that worked with me in this incredible Midterm Election, embracing certain policies and principles, did very well.

    Those that did not, say goodbye! Yesterday was such a very Big Win, and all under the pressure of a Nasty and Hostile Media!

    "To any of the pundits or talking heads that do not give us proper credit for this great Midterm Election, just remember two words - FAKE NEWS!

    And in an apparent threat to his political opponents, he added:


    “If the Democrats think they are going to waste Taxpayer Money investigating us at the House level,

    then we will likewise be forced to consider investigating them for all of the leaks of Classified Information, and much else, at the Senate level.

    Two can play that game!”


    Bang, Bang ! ! !




    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.ex...esults-Donald-Trump-reaction-twitter-vote/amp
     
  26. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  27. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

  28. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    *sheds single tear* Saying Goodbye to these Republicans after the 2018 Midterms


    Saying Goodbye to these Republicans after the 2018 Midterms
     
  29. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    [​IMG]
    Christopher Weyant Copyright 2018 Cagle Cartoons
     
  30. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Top Florida GOP officials urge police to investigate Democratic elections officers.

    Florida began its legally required recount of the close races for governor, Senate, and agriculture commissioner Saturday night, and on Sunday, state Attorney General Pam Bondi (R) told the state police commissioner she was "deeply troubled" state police had declined to investigate the election supervisors in heavily Democratic Broward and Palm Beach counties.

    Gov. Rick Scott (R), whose lead in the Senate race has dwindled as votes are tallied in those counties, accused the election officials of fraud, but did not provide any evidence.

    The state police and Department of State both said they had seen no evidence of fraud or criminal activity in those counties.

    Scott has also filed several lawsuits. The recount tallies must be in by Thursday at 3 p.m.



    Source: Miami Herald, The Associated Press

    ,
     
  31. MASTERBAKER

    MASTERBAKER ヽ(͡° ͜ʖ Grown Folks Board/cooking Super Moderator

    CNN






    6 mins ·




    JUST IN: Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema will win Arizona’s US Senate race, defeating Republican Rep. Martha McSally and flipping a seat that had been in GOP hands for 24 years, CNN projects

    Sami Mir I sense John McCain smiling down on us all.


    [​IMG]
     
  32. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

  33. QueEx

    QueEx Well-Known Member Super Moderator

    Democratic gains, with caveats

    Results from the midterm elections are continuing to trickle in, and they’re looking better than expected for Democrats. The party now appears on track to gain 35 to 40 seats in the House, and to lose just one or two seats in the Senate — rather than three or four, as thought last week.

    Democratic victories in California and once-red states in the Southwest, as well as in Midwestern states where Donald Trump won in 2016, suggest that President Trump’s support is now on shakier ground.

    Still, Republicans did well in rural America and the crucial swing states of Ohio and Florida. That could help them hold the Senate — and the presidency — in 2020.

    • Too close to call: Some races still haven’t been decided. Here’s when we might know who won.​

    • Divided Democrats: A protest at the House of Representatives on Tuesday showed strong disagreement between longtime Washington hands and young progressives like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.​

     

Share This Page