The Official CW's "The 100" (One Hundred) SEASON 6 Thread (Drops 4/30/19) Season 7 Will be it..

fonzerrillii

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Whatever happens there is going to be some major blowback from making the skycrew the 13 tribe. I think lexa is going to take an L soon.
 

fonzerrillii

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Was that tv's first lesbian marriage?
Had to look up Fealty, but this is pretty cool.

This is the wiki definition:

"In medieval Europe, the swearing of fealty took the form of an oath made by a vassal, or subordinate, to his lord. "Fealty" also referred to the duties incumbent upon a vassal that were owed to the lord, which consisted of service and aid.[1] One part of the oath of fealty included swearing to always remain faithful to the lord. The oath of fealty usually took place after the act of homage, when, by the symbolic act of kneeling before the lord and placing his hands between the hands of the lord, the vassal became the "man" of the lord. Usually, the lord also promised to provide for the vassal in some form, either through the granting of a fief or by some other manner of support.[2] Typically the oath took place upon a religious object such as a Bible or saint's relic, often contained within an altar, thus binding the oath-taker before God. Fealty and homage were key elements of European feudalism.

Fealty is distinct from other parts of the homage ceremony, and is usually used only to refer to that part of the ceremony where the vassal swore to be a good vassal to his lord.[3]"
 

fonzerrillii

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Lexa should of did the alliance and everyone would be happy..now she made things complicated than it should be....:smh::smh::smh:
Yeap... I love the fact that her choosing her people over continuing her alliance with Clarke is coming back to bite her in away that she never expected. It is like a parallel to what Clarke is going through emotionally since choosing her people led to killing everyone at Mount Weather.
 

fonzerrillii

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Ok this show is badass, because I just realized something. At first I thought that Nyko's (the healer from the Grounders and Lincoln's best friend) injury from the Ice Nation was a random attack, but What if it wasn't. Nyko's blood was RH null and because of that.. He could only be cured by RH null. Which is why Abby needed to go to mount weather, because they didn't have the technology at the camp.
Well who would have known about the the camps medical capabilities? And who would have known that there would be only one place where the skycrew could go? Oh and Who would have known the one grounder (at that moment.. excluding Indra) that the Ice Nation could injury that the skycrew would help no matter the cost?

Emerson....
The mountain men were spying on the skycrew and the Grounders. So he would have known the relationships between the major players at the camp. Emerson was held inside the medical bay for just long enough to likely see some of their medical capabilities. This was all a well thought out plan to get the Skycrew to start messing with the same technology that killed so many Grounders. This is likely to come up again, by the Ice Queen in order to throw more political support her way.
 

fonzerrillii

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Man it is hard to find this thread.

Outside of the sudden Pike rebellion, the episode was fucking fire. I can't get what is going on with Bellamy, but I will say the previews for next episode raise the stakes to level 20.
 

fonzerrillii

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Why everyone's talking (and tweeting) about The 100
How the CW's sci-fi series weathered a rocky launch to become an addictive drama that trends around the world


Eliza Taylor is used to being caked in mud or blood. Or both. Dirty and disheveled is practically the 26-year-old’s uniform: As Clarke Griffin, the resourceful heroine of The CW’s postapocalyptic thriller The 100, Taylor spends hours running through the forest hunting and being hunted. So when the production — now in its third season — abandoned the wilds surrounding Vancouver, venturing for the first time to the city streets, the actress was ready for something a little more civilized.

Things didn’t quite go her way. “Within about 10 minutes, a fan saw us. And then suddenly, there were 30 of them, and then 60 of them, holding up signs and screaming and crying,” Taylor recalls. “The funny thing is, we thought this would happen. Toward the end of season 2, we reckoned we would get a lot of new fans, and we were right! It just took a while for people to let go of what they thought the show was.”

As in, yet another doomsday drama for the teen set. When The 100, a takeoff on Kass Morgan’s book trilogy, arrived in March 2014, it debuted during the crest of the dystopian-YA wave. Divergent hit theaters the same week. Two Hunger Games films had already been crowned box office victors. So critics found the premise — 100 delinquent teens are blasted off from their spaceship sanctuary (dubbed the Ark) as the sacrificial lambs to test whether a nuclear-war-wasted Earth is inhabitable again — dismissable. Even exec producer Jason Rothenberg admits the early hours failed to land. “Frankly, our worst episodes are the pilot and episode 2,” he says. “I feel like, if not for those two episodes, our audience would have been so much bigger.”

But the first-time showrunner charted a new course after receiving a note from network president Mark Pedowitz. “I said, ‘Do not make what people perceive to be a CW-type show,’ ” Pedowitz remembers. “‘Make the version you want to make — the darker, grittier version.’ ” And that’s what Rothenberg did. In the fifth episode, he killed off hundreds of characters — and then twisted the knife by revealing they had been sacrificed for nothing. “Mark called and was like, ‘Amazing episode! You can go darker,’ ” Rothenberg says, laughing. “I said, ‘Mark! How much darker can you get?’ ”

A whole lot darker, it turns out. Rothenberg transformed The 100 into a grounded, gritty war drama rife with moral quandaries. Season 1 saw the suicide of a 12-year-old; season 2 added a desperate doctor harvesting bone marrow from innocents. And season 3’s new threat? A walking, talking artificial intelligence named Alie (Erica Cerra), whose offer to save the world entices some and terrifies others. “We like to set up impossible choices for our characters,” says Rothenberg. “How far can you go to save your people and still be heroic?”

When viewers began catching up on the new trajectory (season 2 hit Netflix last October, months before season 3’s premiere), the show’s popularity skyrocketed. According to Twitter, the season 3 bow on Jan. 21 racked up roughly 10 times as many tweets as the series premiere and saw #The100 trend worldwide. Critics started paying attention — and respect — as well, leading to even more viewers. “Every day I see dozens of tweets saying, ‘I binged the whole thing in a weekend,’ ” Rothenberg says. “The Netflix effect has been incredibly important.” It was all part of the plan. “We felt the series needed a midseason start to allow for the binges,” Pedowitz says. “That strategy has proven to be the correct one.”

Fans aren’t just cheering the drama’s dark twists; they’re also praising the way it’s pushing the envelope with a diverse cast and an openly bisexual lead, The CW’s first. Clarke’s romance with Lexa (Fear the Walking Dead’s Alycia Debnam-Carey), a leader of the Grounders, spawns fervent hashtagging (the battle cry: #Clexa) in particular. “If we can take anything good from the apocalypse, it’s that we live in a world where gender and sexuality and race isn’t an issue,” Taylor says. “There’s the greater issue of survival.”

The only “problem” with the show’s newfound popularity? Keeping up with all the attention. Star Bob Morley, who plays Bellamy, has given up on reading everything he’s sent — “It’s easier for me to just focus on work,” he explains — but Taylor tracks her online presence. “In six months [my follower count] had gone up by about 50,000. That was crazy!” she says. “It’s made me more careful. You have to censor yourself.” Good thing the chaos of social media doesn’t exist on postapocalyptic Earth.


http://www.ew.com/article/2016/02/16/the-100-why-to-watch
 

ansatsusha_gouki

Cleveland, Ohio
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I think Acardia as we know it is going to get destroyed this season... leading to people joining the city of light. I don't think Pike's blood is going to be enough. As Kain put it, the community voted him in.

That last part is true....which makes no fuckin senses at all :smh:
 

fonzerrillii

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OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Shit....

Todays episode was more like THE 100 that I know and love. This shit isn't going to end well At all. :smh::smh::smh::smh::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes::yes:
 

fonzerrillii

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Really REALLY. Wasn't expecting that. Wow.
This entire Commander/Avatar thing is fascinating. My only issue is that I wish there was more then a 97 year difference between the end of the World and now. I know that the show creators want to stick with the same premise from the book. I'm hoping that there is a much larger time difference and a good sci-fi explanation why sky screw thinks it was 97 years ago.
 

keone

WORLD WAR K
this nigga curtis. hotdamn how many shows he on haha. lex dying wasn't surprising to me. but i liked the back story in this ep.
 

keone

WORLD WAR K


Death is a natural part of life. It's the one thing that unifies us as human beings, the one thing that everyone will experience in their lifetimes. Since The 100 premiered, death has been the show's only constant, hanging over this brutal world like a dark and ugly specter, taunting us and threatening beloved characters. The fight for survival is what motivates characters to keep moving, what forces capable hands and informs decisions. Death is what these people know and understand, and at some point, they will all fall. And so it's inevitable that some of the people we've come to know and come to care about over the course of the show won't make it through this journey toward peace.

But recently that specter also hasn't felt quite as dangerous as it used to, and although it'd be wrong to say that the show has gone soft or pulled punches given the the harrowing events of Mount Weather, the shameful massacre that occurred just prior to the events of "Hakeldama," and Monroe's death last week, it's been a while since an honest-to-goodness major character has died, a character whose death means something monumental, that has the potential to alter the show's trajectory and cause a ripple effect. Which is why from a narrative standpoint, I'm not too upset that Lexa died in "Thirteen" even though it's a big loss for the show. I know her death has likely devastated a good chunk of the show's fandom and potentially alienated even more, but within the context of The 100, it's just the sad reality that these people have to live in and without those stakes, the show wouldn't be doing its job. People die on The 100. It sucks and it hurts, but it is what it is because that's the environment these people live in now. Lexa's death is a pivotal moment for the series, one I think writer Javier Grillo-Marxuach handled with care and grace in an episode that had to answer a lot of questions, and I look forward to seeing how it shapes the rest of the season.



But having said all of that, I can't say that Lexa's death was a shocking development. Alycia Debnam-Carey is a series regular on AMC's Fear the Walking Dead, which meant her time on The 100 this season was likely always going to be brief, and so I've been preparing myself for her exit all season. Which is not meant to say that I had insider knowledge that Lexa was going to die, just that based on circumstantial evidence, it felt inevitable. But regardless of that, the writers have also been foreshadowing Lexa's demise for weeks now, beginning with the introduction of the Nightbloods and Lexa making ominous statements about how Aden would succeed her as commander if anything should happen to her. (Her fate was also sealed when she and Clarke finally had sex because everyone knows that once people have sex on TV or in movies one of them is going to die.) So instead of feeling shock when she was shot by a bullet meant for Clarke, I'd kind of already made peace with the situation and moved right on to thinking about how this would affect the show and affect Clarke moving forward.

As the ladies of Wicked taught us, people come into our lives for a reason, bringing something we must learn, and we are led to those who help us most to grow, if we let them. In their short time in each other's lives, Clarke taught Lexa that life was about more than just surviving and that violence didn't have to beget violence, while Lexa taught Clarke that she could love again after Finn and that peace was not out of the realm of possibility. And although I take issue with the manner in which Lexa died—a stray bullet from a gun fired by Titus, the one man who literally only cared about protecting Lexa, hit her instead of Clarke—her death scene was very well done. It felt kind of weak in the grand scheme of things, like it was too easy and quiet of a death for a warrior like Lexa, but the callback to Season 2, in particular, was a warm and intimate gesture that showed not just that Lexa had truly loved Clarke, but that Clarke had gotten through to her, that Clarke had changed her for the better, and that Clarke shouldn't give up on what they'd started together. It was a strong and moving farewell for a fan favorite character who maybe would have lived under different behind-the-scenes circumstances (but maybe not, who knows?), and I feel for fans who had just experienced the peak of Clarke and Lexa's relationship only to be plummeted to the lowest point moments later. But death happens to everyone sooner or later, especially on The 100, and we can either choose to let the pain consume us, or we can focus on the good that came from from the relationship while channeling that pain to do something that can make a difference.



And if Clarke is smart—and she is—she'll use that pain she's feeling to help save her people from Pike's maniacal grip. She'll let it be the fire that fuel's the rest of her actions this season. Prior to Lexa's death she'd already decided to return to Arkadia after being told off by an angry Octavia, but Clarke's heart wasn't really in it. She knew she needed to return because of the blockade Lexa ordered to protect her people and keep Skaikru contained, but she also needed something to spur her into action. It's not fair to say that Lexa had been holding Clarke back this season, and I'd never describe Clarke as a coward, but as long as Lexa was in Polis, she was giving Clarke a reason not to return to her people, she was indirectly helping Clarke ignore the fallout of her actions at Mount Weather. Clarke kept repeating the line that she could do more good from Polis, and maybe that would have been true if Pike hadn't been elected and Arkadia wasn't divided, but he was and it is. It's time she returns to her people, because with Lexa dead, it may (probably will) only get worse. Without Lexa to enforce "blood must not have blood," we can't know what will happen, but we can guess, and it's not pretty.

Clarke will never be completely healed, she will always be a little broken—especially having lost Lexa so soon after losing Finn (even though I still don't believe she loved him like that)—but she's not helping anyone by staying in Polis. Last season Clarke told her mother that she may have been the chancellor, but she was in charge. She wasn't an elected official, but she was respected by her people and she had their best interests at heart—and unlike Pike, she wasn't intent on starting a war, just doing right by her people. It's time for Clarke to find that same fire within, to find that woman again. And so as sad as Lexa's death was, if it pushes Clarke into action, then maybe it won't be for nothing.



Of course, Lexa's death was about so much more than just Lexa and Clarke and pushing Clarke to fight for her people. Her death has far-reaching implications, and it revealed that the Skaikru and the Grounders are tied together in a way that I'm not sure really tracks mathematically, but I'm also willing to overlook because the narrative being woven together to connect Polis and the A.I. storyline is actually intriguing. I think it's interesting the way advanced technology has birthed a religion for the Grounders because of the way it came to them, but when looked at another way, it's an interesting commentary on society today and the way we treat and value technology. But of course I'm getting ahead of myself. Let's back up.

In "Thirteen" it was revealed that Becca had retreated to space to work on A.L.I.E. 2.0, the second, better version of the A.L.I.E. who was locked in the mansion by the lake before breaking free and launching the nuclear missiles that ended the world because there were "too many people." On the space station Polaris, Becca tirelessly worked to create a better A.I., one that understood what it meant to be human, that could interact with humans and understand their emotions, one that would help save the human race after the previous version destroyed it. But after the commander of Polaris discovered that Becca was working on another A.I., he ordered her to float it before the thirteen space stations united to form the Ark because he feared what could happen to the rest of humanity. Becca refused to destroy her creation, and after inserting the A.I. into the back of her neck, escaped to Earth in a pod only moments before the other stations destroyed Polaris for initially refusing to begin maneuvers to unite.

Becca went on to become the first commander of the humans she met upon landing back on Earth, and this is where the math breaks down. If only 97 years had passed between the end of the world and the time the Hundred arrived, then the humans that Becca met would have been survivors of the apocalypse, would have understood her speech, and would have known and understood technology. Their society would have been primitive in the sense that there had been a nuclear holocaust, there was radiation poisoning them, and they were rebuilding, but not in the sense that they were starting over from the beginning. But again, I'm willing to overlook the fact the math doesn't track, because the intersection of science fiction and faith, of Skaikru and Grounder here is interesting. Because the Grounders, or at the very least, the commanders of the Grounders, are descendants of Skaikru, or of the people from the sky. It should be obvious even without this knowledge that the Skaikru and the Grounders are the same—they're all human beings—but now this links them more directly.



But back to the A.I. that Becca had inserted into her own neck. As a result of Lexa's death, we finally have an explanation for why Grounders believed in reincarnation and thought the lives of past commanders chose them and spoke to them. As it turns out, when one commander dies, the A.I. is removed from their body by the Flamekeeper (who happens to be Titus currently) and implanted into the next commander, someone who also has blood the color of ink, which is a trait that was passed down from Becca herself, though I'm still not entirely sure what that is about because we saw her injecting herself with the substance on Polaris, and we saw it dripping on the table after she'd inserted the A.I., but we still haven't received an explanation. I suspect one will be coming soon, though, (my guess is that it has something to do with the radiation) as the show digs into the aftermath of Lexa's death, the conclave, and what it means for Polis and the rest of the 12 clans.

But to think that something as advanced as A.I. and as something as ancient as faith and religion are intertwined here is intriguing to say the least. We'd already seen something similar regarding A.L.I.E. and the City of Light that Jaha preaches about, but now that's been expanded. The Grounders believed that the spirits of the commander were in the A.I. and in a way that's similar to the "spirits" of the people Jaha's given chips to being able to "see" and "travel to" the City of Light, but this A.I. is even more interesting than A.L.I.E.'s city without pain or death, because a life without death is not a life. Death is what makes life worth living and makes our actions all the more important. Eliminating pain and death may sound like a good idea, but pain and death are what make us human, and if you take that away by uploading someone to a virtual reality, what are you left with? The Grounders believe in reincarnation because of the A.I., which is different from eliminating death and different from A.L.I.E.'s City of Light, and so Lexa accepted her death even as Clarke refused to admit she was dying. It was rather heartbreaking, actually. We still don't really know how the A.I. works in regards to taking on the voices of the past commanders, but damn if it isn't cool/freaky.



We've reached what is essentially the middle of The 100's third season (it's crazy how fast we got here, right?) and everything is starting to come together. In true The 100 fashion it's terribly complicated, but also fascinating and cool. Linking the Grounders and their commanders to the A.I. that A.L.I.E. is looking for was not something I could have predicted at the start of this season, but this turn of events deepened the show's mythology and provided some much-needed answers. Meanwhile, Octavia and Indra reunited and took off for Arkadia to fight against Pike and Bellamy, which is something I absolutely approve of. I've always liked Octavia's dynamic with Indra, and although I'm not really looking forward to Octavia having to fight Bellamy, especially since we know he's going to try to use her to get confirmation that Kane is feeding information, I can't wait to see where these badass ladies go from here.
 

fonzerrillii

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they are saaying they bullied him out of the job. lincoln guy. but he found a new gig tho
Yeah he had to issues with show runner. Like Lexa... I think the show will be better with Lincoln gone. That's means the only grounders out there with a little sympathy for skycru will be indra and Lincolns boy.... But he probably doesn't give a shit about skyru with them keeping his people contained...

I still have the feeling that the Majority of skycru is going to get fucked up before the end of the season.
 
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