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Here's why NATO hates the Kaliningrad SU-27SM3 Flankers

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Su27 in Russian airforce blue; this is the sight NATO planes over the Baltic see in the day-mares

 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
The person who just called me a "Nigga" went straight to my ignore list
and I cannot see him anymore. Who else wants to join him there?
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor


Specifications (Su-27SK)
Sukhoi Su-27 3-view drawings
Data from Gordon and Davison,[116] Sukhoi,[117] KnAAPO,[118] deagel.com,[119] airforce-technology.com[120]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 21.9 m (71 ft 10 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.7 m (48 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 5.92 m (19 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 62 m2 (670 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 16,380 kg (36,112 lb)
  • Gross weight: 23,430 kg (51,654 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 30,450 kg (67,131 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 9,400 kg (20,723.5 lb) internal[121]
  • Powerplant: 2 × Saturn AL-31F afterburning turbofan engines, 75.22 kN (16,910 lbf) thrust each dry, 122.6 kN (27,600 lbf) with afterburner
Performance

  • Maximum speed: 2,500 km/h (1,600 mph, 1,300 kn) / M2.35 at altitude
1,400 km/h (870 mph; 760 kn) / M1.13 at sea level
  • Range: 3,530 km (2,190 mi, 1,910 nmi) At altitude
1,340 km (830 mi; 720 nmi) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 m (62,000 ft)
  • g limits: +9
  • Rate of climb: 300 m/s (59,000 ft/min) [122]
  • Wing loading: 377.9 kg/m2 (77.4 lb/sq ft) With 56% fuel
444.61 kg/m2 (91.1 lb/sq ft)
  • Thrust/weight: 1.07 with 56% internal fuel; 0.91 with full fuel
Armament

Avionics

 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Operators

All current (blue) and former (red) operators of the Su-27

1) AngolaPeople's Air and Air Defence Force of Angola – Seven Su-27s in service as of January 2013.[74] Three were bought from Belarus in 1998. Received a total of eight.[75] One was reportedly shot down on 19 November 2000 by a 9K34 Strela-3 MANPADS during the Angolan Civil War.

2)ChinaPeople's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) – 59 Su-27 fighters, consisting of 33 Su-27SKs and 26 Su-27UBKs as of January 2013.[74] 78 Flankers were delivered under three separate contracts by the Russian KnAAPO and IAPO plants. Delivery of the aircraft began in February 1991 and finished by September 2009.

3) EritreaEritrean Air Force[80]

4) Ethiopia
Ethiopian Air Force

A Su-27 of the Indonesian Air Force
5) IndonesiaIndonesian Air Force (TNI - AU or Tentara Nasional Indonesia - Angkatan Udara) – 5 Su-27SKMs fighters in service.[80]

6) KazakhstanMilitary of Kazakhstan – 20 Su-27/Su-27BM2, 3 Su-27UB/UBM2[citation needed]
A Su-27 of the Kazakh Air Force taking off

7) MongoliaMongolian Air Force – 4 Su-27s as of June 2016. 8 more jets to be delivered to complete a squadron.[81]

8) RussiaRussian Air Force – 359 Su-27 aircraft, including 225 Su-27s, 70 Su-27SMs, 12 Su-27SM3s, and 52 Su-27UBs in service as of January 2014.[83] A modernization program began in 2004.[84][85][86] Half of the fleet has been modernized by 2012.[87] The Russian Air Force is currently receiving aircraft modernized to the SM3 4++ standard.[88][89][90][91]Russian Navy – 53 Su-27s in use as of January 2014

9) UkraineUkrainian Air Force – 70 Su-27s in inventory.[92] It has 34 Su-27s in service as of March 2019.[55]

10) UzbekistanMilitary of Uzbekistan – 34 Su-27s in use as of January 2013

11) VietnamVietnam People's Air Force – 9 Su-27SKs and 3 Su-27UBKs in use as of January 2013[74]

12) United States Two Su-27s were delivered to the U.S. in 1995 from Belarus.[93][94] Two more were bought from Ukraine in 2009 by a private company, Pride Aircraft to be used for aggressor training for U.S. pilots.[95] They have been spotted operating over Area 51 for evaluation and training purposes.[96]

Former operators

13) BelarusBelarusian Air Force inherited 23-28 Su-27s from the former 61st Fighter Aviation Regiment of the Soviet Union.[93] They had 22 in service as of December 2010.[97] Two or three Su-27 were sold to Angola in 1998. Belarus had operated 17 Su-27P and 4 Su-27UBM1 aircraft before their retirement in December 2012.[75][98][99] Soviet UnionSoviet Air Force and Soviet Air Defence Forces.[100] Passed to different successor nations in 1991.

Private ownership
According to the U.S. FAA there are 2 privately owned Su-27s in the U.S.[101] Two Su-27s from the Ukrainian Air Force were demilitarised and sold to Pride Aircraft of Rockford, Illinois, USA. Pride Aircraft modified some of the aircraft to their own desires by remarking all cockpit controls in English and replacing much of the Russian avionics suite with Garmin, Bendix/King, and Collins avionics. The aircraft were both sold to private owners for approximately $5 million each.[102]

On 30 August 2010, the Financial Times claimed that a Western private training support company ECA Program placed a US$1.5 billion order with Belorussian state arms dealer BelTechExport for 15 unarmed Su-27s (with an option on 18 more) to organize a dissimilar air combat training school in the former NATO airbase in Keflavik, Iceland with deliveries due by the end of 2012.[103][104] A September 2010 media report by RIA Novosti questioned the existence of the agreement.[105] No further developments on such a plan have been reported by 2014, while a plan for upgrading and putting the retired Belorussian Air Force Su-27 fleet back to service was reported in February 2014.[106]

Notable accidents
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Westerners so fear the Su27s so much that they were willing to pay US$100million
for each of 15 that were so outdated that they were decommissioned by Belarus;
Remember, an F-35 is about $100million brand new from Lockheed Martin today

These people were willing to $1.5 billion. I have to believe that this was a covert
US program. I doubt that any other country, or private organisation, would have
this kind of money for this sort of scheme.


Private ownership
On 30 August 2010, the Financial Times claimed that a Western private training support company ECA Program placed a US$1.5 billion order with Belorussian state arms dealer BelTechExport for 15 unarmed Su-27s (with an option on 18 more) to organize a dissimilar air combat training school in the former NATO airbase in Keflavik, Iceland with deliveries due by the end of 2012.[103][104] A September 2010 media report by RIA Novosti questioned the existence of the agreement.[105] No further developments on such a plan have been reported by 2014, while a plan for upgrading and putting the retired Belorussian Air Force Su-27 fleet back to service was reported in February 2014.[106]
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
@Nzinga was it you that made the thread saying these planes were better than the F-22?
I never made a thread saying the Su27s are better than F22s. As a matter of fact,
this is the first Su27 thread I have ever made.

In what way? The F-22 is highly flawed plane but is still none the less endowed
with impressive qualities in its own way. The problems with the F22 start with
the fact that it needs excessive maintenance, and therefore has a low duty ratio.
The stealth coatings need constant expensive repairs. The plane cannot fly in
the rain; the plane has limited electronics- for example, it does not have infra-
red search and tracking, something every Russian plane and the F35 have. It
has no ability to network data with any other plane, and for most part, it flies
in radio silence. It has a tiny payload, and if bombs are fitted on wing racks,
its stealth is gone. Recently, the US airforce announced that it does not want
the F-22 anymore. It will start retiring the planes in 2030. In its place, the US
airforce is bringing back the nearly 50 year old F15 in the E version. The US
is also counting on its new 6th generation fighter coming into service at that
time. Remember that the F-22 was supposed to serve up to 2050.

My suspicion is that after Egypt received the first of its 24 Su35S from Russia late
last year, the US went to test the that plane. As you know, the US airforce is deeply
embedded in the military affairs of Egypt. I suspect that the US confirmed what had
always been rumoured: the Irbis E PESA radar on the Su35S can see the F22 from
miles away. That being the case, the F22 is essentially rendered obsolete since the
S35s is vastly superior to the F22 in every other way. The Israelis had actually predicted
this. They said that stealth would be obsolete in 10 years. I do not want to start a thread
on this, but generally speaking, stealth is another bullshit concept.

The problem with the F22 is that it was more or less the pioneer of stealth. It therefore
suffered many birthing problems. The planes that have come behind, like the F35, the
Chinese J20 and the Russian Su35 have all learned a lot from the F22. They have taken
the good, and denied the bad. These platforms are therefore more functional than the
F22.

The Su27 is a capable, but limited platform. It is serving the needs of Russia in
Kaliningrad because the Russians have about 400 of them, though the vast
majority need updating.
 
Last edited:

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
NATO also means the UK, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Belgium, etc etc
and its allied partners in the Scandnavia. The likes of Poland, with their
primitive F16s and Mig29s are the most troublesome.

The US and Russia, like the ' proverbial elephant vs rhino, are fearfully
respectful of each other. They know that in a fight, they would bloody
each other's nose very seriously.

It is the other countries which expect to summon the US to their fights that
are provocative. As the Scottish commentator and former UK MP, George
Galloway, is fond of saying, the UK, for example, likes to threaten people
with America's army.
 

thismybgolname

Rising Star
OG Investor
The US isn't worried about this plane.

European allies might be worried but this plane poses no threat to the US military.
 
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lightbright

Master Pussy Poster
BGOL Investor
If I'm on ignore then how the fuck do you know I'm here? Did one of your female goats rat me out? How bout we make amends? Set up a one hour jizz-fest for me in the back of your mom's throat and then we'll let bygones be bygones. Whatcha say, Skippy?
I'm betting that goat with the fat ass I posted is the one that snitched on you...
:lol:
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
The US isn't worried about this plane.

European allies might be worried but this plane poses no threat to the US military.



That is what YOU are saying; below is what experts and analysts know and are saying







Russia’s Su-27 Fighters Wreak Absolute Havoc in the Baltics
The Kaliningrad Flankers are arguably the busiest—and most dangerous—Su-27s anywhere in the world.

by David Axe Follow @daxe on TwitterL

Here's What You Need to Remember: Russia's Kaliningrad Flankers patrol over the Baltic, intercept NATO and neutral spy planes in international air space and, on occasion, harass the rival planes so aggressively that they have no choice but to flee. If any Russian warplanes end up causing an international incident in the tense Baltic region, it will likely be the Kaliningrad Su-27s.



On June 9, 2017, examples of all three of the U.S. Air Force’s heavy bombers — the swing-wing B-1, the stealthy B-2 and the lumbering B-52 — gathered in international air space over the Baltic Sea for a rare photo-op with allied fighters and patrol planes.

They had a surprise visitor. A Russian air force Su-27 Flanker fighter sidled up to the U.S.-led formation and flew alongside long enough to appear in multiple photos. A few days prior, an Su-27 intercepted a B-52 over the Baltic.
The Su-27 was apparently one of seven Flankers that fly from Kaliningrad, Moscow’s Baltic enclave, sandwiched between Lithuania and Poland and geographically separate from the rest of Russia.

The Kaliningrad Flankers are arguably the busiest—and most dangerous—Su-27s anywhere in the world



They patrol over the Baltic, intercept NATO and neutral spy planes in international air space and, on occasion, harass the rival planes so aggressively that they have no choice but to flee.
If any Russian warplanes end up causing an international incident in the tense Baltic region, it will likely be the Kaliningrad Su-27s.


Over the Baltic on Oct. 3, 2014, an Su-27 with the numeral 24 on its nose in red paint flew so close to a Swedish air force Gulfstream spy plane—around 30 feet, according to Combat Aircraft’s Babak Taghvaee—that the Swedish crew could clearly identify the Russian jet’s weapons, including four R-27 and two R-73 air-to-air missiles.
In June 2017, Russia’s defense minister Sergey Shoigu was flying to Kaliningrad when a Polish F-16 intercepted the minister’s transport plane. A pair of Su-27s — likely from the enclave — intervened.

A few days later, an apparent Kaliningrad Su-27 with the nose code Red 93 flew so close to a U.S. Air Force RC-135 spy plane that the Pentagon formally complained.
While for many decades opposing air arms have routinely intercepted each other’s planes in international air space, NATO and Swedish authorities have grown increasingly concerned over Moscow’s actions in the Baltic region.



Russian aerial activity in the Baltic region has been on the rise for years — and escalated sharply following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in early 2014. Fighters from NATO and neutral countries have intercepted Russian planes on hundreds of separate occasions since then.
“We have seen examples of the actions of air power that can be perceived as more aggressive than what we’ve seen in a long time,” army general Sverker Goranson, then Sweden’s top officer, told a Swedish news outlet in 2014.

In June 2014, Kaliningrad Su-27s again flew within 30 feet of a Swedish spy plane. The Su-27s have also tangled with Swedish Gripen fighters and French Mirage jets. The Flankers have repeatedly intercepted, and occasionally endangered, American RC-135s.
In July 2014, an RC-135 was presumably monitoring electronic signals from the Russian enclave when at least two of the resident Su-27s—which as of 2014 included three Su-27SM3s, one Su-27P and an Su-27S, among others—vectored for an intercept.

Something about the Flankers’ behavior frightened the American aircrew. The RC-135 turned and ran—straight into Swedish territory. “The U.S. aircraft was directed towards Swedish air space incorrectly by U.S. personnel,” the Pentagon’s European Command said in a statement.
Five months later in September 2014, the Kaliningrad Flankers—which the Russian air force detached from the 6972nd Aviation Base in Krasnador, just north of the Black Sea—took part in a massive exercise that tested the Kremlin’s ability to reinforce Kaliningrad with scores of extra warplanes and hundreds of paratroopers.



War games have become commonplace off Kaliningrad. In July 2017, Russian and Chinese warships conducted mock naval combat off Kaliningrad. And Russia staged parts of its sprawling Zapad exercise in Kaliningrad in September 2017.
Russian Flankers have also escorted heavy bombers conducting mock attack runs on European countries—although it’s not entirely clear that those Su-27s came from Kaliningrad.

David Axe served as Defense Editor of the National Interest. He is the author of the graphic novels War Fix, War Is Boring and Machete Squad.
This article is being republished due to reader interest. It originally appeared at War is Boring.
 
Last edited:

thismybgolname

Rising Star
OG Investor
That is what YOU are saying; below is what experts and analysts know and are saying







Russia’s Su-27 Fighters Wreak Absolute Havoc in the Baltics
The Kaliningrad Flankers are arguably the busiest—and most dangerous—Su-27s anywhere in the world.

by David Axe Follow @daxe on TwitterL

Here's What You Need to Remember: Russia's Kaliningrad Flankers patrol over the Baltic, intercept NATO and neutral spy planes in international air space and, on occasion, harass the rival planes so aggressively that they have no choice but to flee. If any Russian warplanes end up causing an international incident in the tense Baltic region, it will likely be the Kaliningrad Su-27s.



On June 9, 2017, examples of all three of the U.S. Air Force’s heavy bombers — the swing-wing B-1, the stealthy B-2 and the lumbering B-52 — gathered in international air space over the Baltic Sea for a rare photo-op with allied fighters and patrol planes.

They had a surprise visitor. A Russian air force Su-27 Flanker fighter sidled up to the U.S.-led formation and flew alongside long enough to appear in multiple photos. A few days prior, an Su-27 intercepted a B-52 over the Baltic.
The Su-27 was apparently one of seven Flankers that fly from Kaliningrad, Moscow’s Baltic enclave, sandwiched between Lithuania and Poland and geographically separate from the rest of Russia.

The Kaliningrad Flankers are arguably the busiest—and most dangerous—Su-27s anywhere in the world



They patrol over the Baltic, intercept NATO and neutral spy planes in international air space and, on occasion, harass the rival planes so aggressively that they have no choice but to flee.
If any Russian warplanes end up causing an international incident in the tense Baltic region, it will likely be the Kaliningrad Su-27s.


Over the Baltic on Oct. 3, 2014, an Su-27 with the numeral 24 on its nose in red paint flew so close to a Swedish air force Gulfstream spy plane—around 30 feet, according to Combat Aircraft’s Babak Taghvaee—that the Swedish crew could clearly identify the Russian jet’s weapons, including four R-27 and two R-73 air-to-air missiles.
In June 2017, Russia’s defense minister Sergey Shoigu was flying to Kaliningrad when a Polish F-16 intercepted the minister’s transport plane. A pair of Su-27s — likely from the enclave — intervened.

A few days later, an apparent Kaliningrad Su-27 with the nose code Red 93 flew so close to a U.S. Air Force RC-135 spy plane that the Pentagon formally complained.
While for many decades opposing air arms have routinely intercepted each other’s planes in international air space, NATO and Swedish authorities have grown increasingly concerned over Moscow’s actions in the Baltic region.



Russian aerial activity in the Baltic region has been on the rise for years — and escalated sharply following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in early 2014. Fighters from NATO and neutral countries have intercepted Russian planes on hundreds of separate occasions since then.
“We have seen examples of the actions of air power that can be perceived as more aggressive than what we’ve seen in a long time,” army general Sverker Goranson, then Sweden’s top officer, told a Swedish news outlet in 2014.

In June 2014, Kaliningrad Su-27s again flew within 30 feet of a Swedish spy plane. The Su-27s have also tangled with Swedish Gripen fighters and French Mirage jets. The Flankers have repeatedly intercepted, and occasionally endangered, American RC-135s.
In July 2014, an RC-135 was presumably monitoring electronic signals from the Russian enclave when at least two of the resident Su-27s—which as of 2014 included three Su-27SM3s, one Su-27P and an Su-27S, among others—vectored for an intercept.

Something about the Flankers’ behavior frightened the American aircrew. The RC-135 turned and ran—straight into Swedish territory. “The U.S. aircraft was directed towards Swedish air space incorrectly by U.S. personnel,” the Pentagon’s European Command said in a statement.
Five months later in September 2014, the Kaliningrad Flankers—which the Russian air force detached from the 6972nd Aviation Base in Krasnador, just north of the Black Sea—took part in a massive exercise that tested the Kremlin’s ability to reinforce Kaliningrad with scores of extra warplanes and hundreds of paratroopers.



War games have become commonplace off Kaliningrad. In July 2017, Russian and Chinese warships conducted mock naval combat off Kaliningrad. And Russia staged parts of its sprawling Zapad exercise in Kaliningrad in September 2017.
Russian Flankers have also escorted heavy bombers conducting mock attack runs on European countries—although it’s not entirely clear that those Su-27s came from Kaliningrad.

David Axe served as Defense Editor of the National Interest. He is the author of the graphic novels War Fix, War Is Boring and Machete Squad.
This article is being republished due to reader interest. It originally appeared at War is Boring.
Where in this article that you posted of an "expert" does it state that the US military is threatened by these planes?

Harrassing planes airplanes doesn't mean that this plan is superior to what the US has.
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Where in this article that you posted of an "expert" does it state that the US military is threatened by these planes?

Harrassing planes airplanes doesn't mean that this plan is superior to what the US has.

Read the article

On June 9, 2017, examples of all three of the U.S. Air Force’s heavy bombers — the swing-wing B-1, the stealthy B-2 and the lumbering B-52 — gathered in international air space over the Baltic Sea for a rare photo-op with allied fighters and patrol planes.

They had a surprise visitor. A Russian air force Su-27 Flanker fighter sidled up to the U.S.-led formation and flew alongside long enough to appear in multiple photos. A few days prior, an Su-27 intercepted a B-52 over the Baltic.
The Su-27 was apparently one of seven Flankers that fly from Kaliningrad, Moscow’s Baltic enclave, sandwiched between Lithuania and Poland and geographically separate from the rest of Russia.
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Where in this article that you posted of an "expert" does it state that the US military is threatened by these planes?

Harrassing planes airplanes doesn't mean that this plan is superior to what the US has.

NATO: Russian Su-27 Violates Danish Airspace While Pursuing B-52
Aug. 31, 2020 | By Brian W. Everstine
A Russian fighter jet pursuing an Air Force B-52 violated Danish air space on Aug. 28, the same day a separate set of Russian fighters intercepted another B-52 in a manner U.S. officials say was unprofessional and unsafe.
The B-52, deployed to Europe as part of a bomber task force, was flying over the Baltic Sea as part of the “Allied Sky” flyover of NATO nations when a Russian Su-27 scrambled from Kaliningrad and pursued the bomber from international airspace, flying “well into Danish airspace” in the vicinity of the Island of Bornholm, NATO Allied Air Command said in a release. The act is a “significant violation” of Denmark’s airspace, according to the alliance.
“This incident demonstrates Russia’s disrespect of international norms and for the sovereign airspace of an Allied nation,” said USAF Gen. Jeffrey L. Harrigian, commander of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and NATO’s Allied Air Command, in the release. “We remain vigilant, ready, and prepared to secure NATO airspace 24/7.”
Danish Quick Reaction Alert aircraft launched to “counter the violation,” but the Russian fighters had turned back. The Danish jets stayed airborne and patrolled the area.
The intrusion was the first of its kind “for several years and indicates a new level of Russian provocative behavior,” NATO said.

Two Russian Su-27 Flanker pilots intercepted a U.S. Air Force B-52 bomber that was conducting routine operations in the Black Sea over international waters on Aug. 28, 2020. DOD video.
Earlier the same day, the two Russian Su-27s intercepted another B-52 in the Black Sea in an “unsafe and unprofessional manner,” crossing within 100 feet of the nose of the B-52 while at the same altitude and in afterburner. Video of the intercept showed the B-52 experiencing turbulence because of the maneuver.
“Actions like these increase the potential for midair collisions, are unnecessary, and inconsistent with good airmanship and international flight rules,” Harrigian said in a release about the incident. “While the Russian aircraft were operating in international airspace, they jeopardized the safety of flight of the aircraft involved. We expect them to operate within international standards set to ensure safety and prevent accidents,” he added.
Air
 

thismybgolname

Rising Star
OG Investor
Read the article
Read that and it means nothing to support your argument.

I did a control f to look for the F-22 or F-35 in your article and it doesn't mention it, only out dated bomber planes that had a visitor.

Once again, please show where in your article from the expert that the US military is afraid of this plane.
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Where in this article that you posted of an "expert" does it state that the US military is threatened by these planes?

Harrassing planes airplanes doesn't mean that this plan is superior to what the US has.
The Seven Most Dangerous Su-27s in the World
War Is Boring
Follow
Nov 27, 2014 · 4 min read





Russia’s jet fighters in Kaliningrad harass NATO and Swedish planes
On Oct. 3, a Swedish air force Gulfstream spy plane took off from Linkoping air base in southern Sweden and flew roughly southeast over the Baltic Sea in order to monitor Russian naval maneuvers in international waters.
The Gulfstream soon had company—one of seven Russian air force Su-27 Flanker jet fighters that fly from Kaliningrad, Moscow’s Baltic enclave, sandwiched between Lithuania and Poland and geographically separate from the rest of Russia.
The Kaliningrad Flankers are arguably the busiest—and most dangerous—Su-27s anywhere in the world.
They patrol over the Baltic, intercept NATO and Swedish spy planes in international air space and, on occasion, harass the rival planes so aggressively that they have no choice but to flee.
If any Russian planes end up causing an international incident in the tense Baltic region, it will likely be the Kaliningrad Su-27s.
Over the Baltic on Oct. 3, an Su-27 with the numeral 24 on its nose in red paint flew so close to the Swedish Gulfstream—around 10 meters, according to Combat Aircraft’s Babak Taghvaee—that the Swedish crew could clearly identify the Russian jet’s weapons, including four R-27 and two R-73 air-to-air missiles.
While for many decades opposing air arms have routinely intercepted each other’s planes in international air space, NATO and Swedish authorities have grown increasingly concerned over Moscow’s actions in the Baltic region.
As Russian troops continue to back armed separatists in Ukraine, Moscow’s warplanes have violated Sweden’s territory dozens of times in 2014. This year NATO’s fighters have intercepted Russian planes on no fewer than 100 separate occasions.
“We have seen examples of the actions of air power that can be perceived as more aggressive than what we’ve seen in a long time,” army general Sverker Goranson, Sweden’s top officer, told a Swedish news outlet.
The October intercept was hardly the only—or the worst—incident. During a similar incident in July, an Su-27 again flew within 10 meters of a Swedish Gulfstream. The Kaliningrad Su-27s have also tangled with Swedish Gripen fighters and French Mirage jets. And in April, July and October, the Flankers intercepted U.S. Air Force RC-135 spy planes flying near Kaliningrad.
On July 18, an RC-135 was presumably monitoring electronic signals from the Russian enclave when at least two of the resident Su-27s—which according to Taghvaee include three Su-27SM3s, one Su-27P and an Su-27S, among others—vectored for an intercept.
Something about the Flankers’ behavior frightened the American aircrew. The RC-135 turned and ran—straight into Swedish territory. “The U.S. aircraft was directed towards Swedish air space incorrectly by U.S. personnel,” the Pentagon’s European Command said in a statement.
At top—Su-27 24 Red intercepts the Swedish spy plane in October. Swedish air force photo. Above—Red 24 on the ground. Photo via Wikipedia
Five months later in September, the Kaliningrad Flankers—which the Russian air force detached from the 6972nd Aviation Base in Krasnador, just north of the Black Sea—took part in a massive exercise that tested the Kremlin’s ability to reinforce Kaliningrad with scores of extra warplanes and hundreds of paratroopers.
NATO jets monitored similar movements of Russian planes to Kaliningrad twice in late October. Each aerial convoy included at least one Su-27.
Russian Flankers have also escorted heavy bombers conducting mock attack runs on European countries—although it’s not entirely clear that those Su-27s came from Kaliningrad.
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
Read that and it means nothing to support your argument.

I did a control f to look for the F-22 or F-35 in your article and it doesn't mention it, only out dated bomber planes that had a visitor.

Once again, please show where in your article from the expert that the US military is afraid of this plane.
That is because you do not know a damn thing. What would be an F-35 be
doing in a sky infested with air superiority fighters? Why are you looking for
F22s and F35s, are they flying in the Baltics? If they are not, why are they not?
The Russians are chasing every NATO plane that comes close to their border.
They are not the ones deciding which NATO planes should fly. It IS NOT up
to you to choose the parameters of the fight. The fight is what it is.
 

Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
You continue to post articles of harassment which isn't an indication of air superiority.
what is air superiority?

There is a fight going on for the Baltic. The Russian are driving everyone away
from their tiny enclave, which is surrounded on 270 degrees of its border by
NATO

Is an F35 an air superiority fighter?
 

thismybgolname

Rising Star
OG Investor
That is because you do not know a damn thing. What would be an F-35 be
doing in a sky infested with air superiority fighters? Why are you looking for
F22s and F35s, are they flying in the Baltics? If they are not, why are they not?
The Russians are chasing every NATO plane that comes close to their border.
They are not the ones deciding which NATO planes should fly. It IS NOT up
to you to choose the parameters of the fight. The fight is what it is.
I know that you're fan of Russian aircraft.

I know that you've yet to post anything that refutes what I said about the US being threatened by this plane.

Odds are I know more about military aircraft than you do.

The reason why I brought up the F-22 and F-35 is because they're the most advanced fighters that we have and your article that you posted from the "expert" is talking about bomber planes being harassed by fighters.

I don't give a shit about NATO , my comment was specifically about the US not being worried about this jet.

You don't know a damn thing but you think you do.
 
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Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
I know that you're fan of Russian aircraft.

I know that you've yet to post anything that refutes what I said about the US being threatened by this plane.

Odds are I know more about military aircraft than you do.

The reason why I brought up the F-22 and F-35 is because they're the most advanced fighters that we have and your article that you posted from the "expert" is talking about bomber planes being harassed by fighters.

I don't give a shit about NATO planes, my comment was specifically about the US not being worried about this jet.

You don't know a damn thing but you think you do.

You are misunderstanding my post. I am not saying that the Su27 is the best
airplane in the Russian airforce. The Su27 is inferior to the Su57, Su35S, Su30SM
and arguably less than the Mig35. If I wanted to talk about the superiority of planes,
I would bring up the those Russian planes


Right now, the Russians have drawn a line in the sand; they have said that they will
go after any NATO planes that come close to their area. This is what they are doing,
and NATO is not responding in kind. This is what is making those Russian Su27S so
dangerous.

The Russians could be their firing the Tsar Cannon at NATO planes and I would be
writing about it; It would be the most feared cannon in the world, even it is more
than 200 years old because of how the Russians were already using it

 
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Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
If the Americans, or who ever it is, are willing to pay $1.5 billion for 15
outdated and retired Su27s, then they are afraid of something. That is
the price Americans are paying for their brand new F35s.
 
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Nzinga

Lover of Africa
BGOL Investor
In Syria, it is said that when an Su35S flies into an area, all the other
planes fly away.
 
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