Copper Color Races... We Were already here...

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Question Everything and Believe Nothing!!!

Research your own family!! And dont let these colonist views history and how they view you, Stop you from finding out the truth!! The truth is hidden right in front of our faces..

And dont, I repeat dont go by today meaning of a word.. Go back to the time era and search words.. We are being mislead and miseducated, distracted, divided and kept in a deep sleep by design!!!


Before the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth, we were here. Before the pen of Jefferson etched across the pages of history the majestic words of the Declaration of Independence, we were here.
Martin Luther King, Jr.


 
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roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
The name of the game is to continue to change who we are!! Question these history books and research and read,, Its all right in front of us and public record!!
























 
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roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Beginning of the End of Copper-Colored Natives
July 29, 2014UncategorizedEast of the Mississippi, Indian Removal Act, Trail of Tears
The 1830 Indian Removal Act forced Indians, living east of the Mississippi River, from their ancestral lands to unchartered territories west of the Mississippi. This migration became known as the Trail of Tears because many died along the way and the rest suffered hardships trying to survive in a completely foreign land. Some fought to stay, but also suffered great hardships at the hands of the European settlers.
Note: the term “Indian” was given to natives of America by Christopher Columbus because he originally thought he landed on the shores of India. The people impacted by this law were the copper-colored race of people the Europeans found here.
Know Better:
Indian Treaties and the Removal Act of 1830 – U.S. Dept. of State, Office of the Historian
The Trail of Tears, The Indian Removals – USHistory.org
Indian Removal – Wikipedia.org

Do Better:
Research your ancestry so you’ll know who you are and the history of your people. Too many copper-colored people believe their ancestral history was lost during the slave trade because of believing they came from Africa. This belief desensitizes you to the perils of the original people of America, who just may turn out to be your ancestors.
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Even MLK was giving us the heads up, during his speech.. Everyone knows this information but US!!!!!!!


Negro Exile in OWN Land

We’ve all heard and read Dr. King’s, “I Have A Dream” speech, or portions of it, at various points in our lives. You’d have to be living in a bubble not to hear it on the King holiday every year. It was recently brought to my attention that there is a little known segment of his speech that we all need to pay very close attention to:
“One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.”
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Is it possible Dr. King was trying to tell us who we are? Could he have been sending us a message, letting us know we are in our own land? Before I started my ancestry research, I probably would have thought that wasn’t what he meant. But now, I think it is possible; based on all the factual evidence I’ve stumbled across pointing to African-Americans being the copper-colored races of people the Europeans found here.
A lot of people may not buy into the connection I’m attempting to make here and that’s understandable. But consider that a lot was riding on this speech, and Dr. King would have selected his message and words carefully. Also consider that Dr. King was an educated man, and, from what I recall, he never referred to us as Africans or being from Africa.
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Were still living under these 1400 rules and laws


Racial Tensions Fueled by Manifest Destiny

American Progress by George A. Crofutt c1873 – Library of Congress
The racial tensions we’ve seen brewing in America have been here since the Europeans first stepped foot on this land. The original people welcomed them and were willing to share everything because there was more than enough for everyone. The Europeans, however, had a different plan. One driven by what they called, “Manifest Destiny.” The pioneers believed they had a divine obligation to stretch the boundaries of their Republic all the way to the Pacific Ocean, despite the fact there were people already living on the land. They even went so far as to say their god blessed their actions. Yes, this is the same god most of you still pray to today. The image shown here is a depiction of Columbia, the “Spirit of the Frontier” leading the settlers westward. She’s holding telephone wires in one hand and books in another as they encounter the original people and bison. What does this have to do with racial tensions in America today? Everything!
The posts in this blog provide factual information outlining how today’s people of color are the descendants of the original copper-colored people the Europeans found in America. What was done to our ancestors back then is still being done to us today because the mindset of “Manifest Destiny” never went away. The articles listed in the Know Better section below talk about how the original people were considered heathens and had to be christianized by the missionaries. It also eludes to the need for replacing “darkness” with “light” and ignorance with civilization. The original people who did get christianized and so-called civilized were the ones who moved west of the Mississippi during the Trail of Tears and were initially embraced by the Europeans. The others, who didn’t conform and stayed on their land East of the Mississippi, were shunned and treated harshly.
It was clear then and is clear now that in order for us to be accepted we must assimilate and if we don’t, we’re shunned, treated harshly or portrayed in a negative light. This is what causes tension between whites and non-whites. The article goes on to discuss that at the heart of “Manifest Destiny” was the pervasive belief in racial superiority and that the original people were considered to be inferior. This belief also never went away, as much as whites would like to believe it did. This fuels racial tension more than anything! In today’s society for example, people of color who leave their inner-city neighborhoods, go off to college, get jobs in corporate America and live in the suburbs are accepted. On the other hand, people of color who never leave the inner-city are not accepted and are therefore shunned, treated harshly and portrayed in a negative light. Until this mindset is erased, and I’m not sure that it can be, race relations will continue to be a problem. The first step to solving any problem is awareness of the root cause.
Know Better:
Manifest Destiny – UShistory.org
Manifest Destiny – Wikipedia.org
Ancestry DNA by the Numbers – blog post
Do Better:
Learn the truth about your history or you’ll be at the mercy of the one telling the story. My son was taught in school that “Manifest Destiny” was a good thing for America, just like it was implied in his school that the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade was good for the American economy. We have an obligation to our youth to educate them on the truth, so others won’t dictate their worth to them.
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Ancestral Blood Flowing Through Your Veins

Do you know your blood type? Surprisingly, most people don’t. You inherit your blood type from your parents and they inherit it from their parents, and so on, and so on. Just like the breadcrumbs that led Hansel and Gretel back to their home in the children’s fable, your blood type can give you clues as to where your ancestors may have come from.
The O blood type is extremely common among the indigenous people of the Americas.
Know Better:
Blood Type Geography Maphttps://www2.palomar.edu/anthro/vary/vary_3.htm -AnthroPalomar.edu (Palomar College)
Do Better:
If you don’t already know your blood type, find out and compare it to the blood type geography map for a possible clue to where your ancestors may have originated. If you are not Type O, this does not rule you out of having your origins in America. Remember, your blood type comes from both your parents.
 
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Mrfreddygoodbud

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Ancestral Blood Flowing Through Your Veins

Do you know your blood type? Surprisingly, most people don’t. You inherit your blood type from your parents and they inherit it from their parents, and so on, and so on. Just like the breadcrumbs that led Hansel and Gretel back to their home in the children’s fable, your blood type can give you clues as to where your ancestors may have come from.
The O blood type is extremely common among the indigenous people of the Americas.
Know Better:
Blood Type Geography Map – AnthroPalomar.edu (Palomar College)
Do Better:
If you don’t already know your blood type, find out and compare it to the blood type geography map for a possible clue to where your ancestors may have originated. If you are not Type O, this does not rule you out of having your origins in America. Remember, your blood type comes from both your parents.
keep breakin it down bruh....

but check your blood type link... not working
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Listen to the family!! Dont let these colonist mislead, distract, confuse or divide the masses!! The name of the game is, to keep our copper color people in a deep sleep, that way we dont want all our shit back.. The truth is hidden right in front of our faces!!





The black Americans suing to reclaim their Native American identity
Rhonda Grayson, with an image of her great-great grandfather Willie Cohee. Photograph: Brett Deering/The Guardian
Their ancestors were black slaves owned by Native Americans. Now they’re suing the Creek nation to fully restore their citizenship
by Caleb Gayle




Johnnie Mae Austin and her grandson, Damario Solomon-Simmons, can tell you everything about their ancestry. They can go back as far as 1810, the year Solomon-Simmons’ great-great-great-great-grandfather, Cow Tom, was born. With undeniable pride, they recount the man’s feats of bravery during the civil war, and his leadership within Oklahoma’s Creek population.
In fact, they are so determined to let the world know exactly who Cow Tom was that they’re suing the Creek nation to make sure his descendants aren’t forgotten.
Solomon-Simmons and his grandmother are black, but they argue they’re also Creek, and they’re fighting to reclaim their identity.
In 1979, a new tribal constitution made it more difficult to prove Creek ancestry. Black Creeks in particular found it almost impossible to claim the identity their ancestors and as a result, thousands lost their Creek citizenship.
In August 2018, Solomon-Simmons – the lead attorney representing six named plaintiffs, including his grandmother – filed a lawsuit against the Muscogee Creek nation and the interior department to fully restore the citizenship of black Creeks.
As a result, a minority group is suing another minority group for inclusion in the indigenous minority group – and to settle this peculiar case, one has to go back nearly 200 years.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/nov/02/black-americans-native-creek-nation#img-2
Johnnie Mae Austin, whose grandfather was ‘Creek to the bone,’ is a plaintiff in the Creek Freedmen suit. Photograph: Brett Deering/The Guardian
Austin, 86, was born in Haskell, Oklahoma. Her grandfather, Jake Simmons, “was Creek to the bone,” she says. Simmons spoke fluent Creek, and Austin chuckles at the memory of him using Creek curse words. When I interviewed her in her North Tulsa home, she sang me one of the songs her grandfather taught her – also in Creek.
Jake Simmons was Cow Tom’s grandson. He, like other black slaves owned by Native Americans, made his way west on the Trail of Tears (the forced relocation of Native American peoples) from Florida to Oklahoma.
Some of Cow Tom’s descendants dispute he was ever a slave; some documents say he was initially a Creek slave; either way, he arrived in Oklahoma in the early 1830s and soon became a pillar of the black Creek community, and a man of considerable economic and political stature. Accounts from Cow Tom’s grandchildren describe him as a “jet black man of medium build” whose success was measured by his seemingly “unlimited supply of cattle”.
A cultural broker helped by his English skills and familiarity with white American culture, Cow Tom eventually served as the principal chief of Canadian Town, a freed black township within the Creek nation, and also represented the Creek nation before the interior department.
Cow Tom’s success was not particularly unique among hardworking black Creeks in eastern Oklahoma. On 18 November 1910, the Topeka Plaindealer reported that “a large percentage of the negro population on the eastern side of the state [had] rich allotments from their Indian citizenship”.
According to the same article, many of them started out as slaves of the Creeks, but gained freedom through the Emancipation Proclamation. The US government compelled Native Americans to “sign treaties allowing their former negro slaves to share in their landed inheritance”, meaning black former slaves were given plots of land in the Creek community.


https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/nov/02/black-americans-native-creek-nation#img-3
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Attorney Damario Solomon-Simmons at his grandmother Johnnie Mae Austin’s home in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Photograph: Brett Deering/The Guardian
In Oklahoma, in the late 1970s, Austin routinely received mail from the Creek nation. The mail typically included news, ballots for voting on tribal matters, and checks for shares of the revenue from land and cattle dealings.
That mail was a connection to an identity Austin always thought was true – “It’s just who I was,” she says – until the mail suddenly stopped in 1979.
This was the result of a 1976 federal lawsuit, during which the Creeks had manage to shake off some of the paternalistic reach of the US government. Creeks then voted to reconstitute citizenship parameters, kicking out many black people who had enjoyed citizenship since 1866.
According to Dr Daniel Littlefield of the Sequoyah National Research Center: “There’s a strong element of ‘we are a tribe’ Indians [to that decision]. So I think it was probably just out-and-out racism that motivated those people” to remove black people from inclusion in the nation.
Citizenship parameters were now limited to those who could find ancestors registered on the 1906 Dawes Rolls, a special federal census that defined Native Americans according to the vague principle of “blood quantum”.
Without the intricate genealogical testing that is readily accessible now, the Dawes Rolls – based on interviews and eyeballing of people’s ancestry – yielded less than precise results. Austin recalls a family story about her grandparents; one, who looked very dark, was assumed not to have Creek ancestry, and another, whose skin tone was very light, was assumed to be Creek. But both were equally Creek.
Today, if you want Creek citizenship, “you would have to find a direct lineage to [a] person on that roll,” Nathan Wilson of the Creek citizenship office says.
Austin can’t trace her direct lineage to the “Creek by blood” list of that roll which the citizenship office uses for validating citizenship. But her family can be found on the Creek Freedman list of the Dawes roll. Coincidentally, their own and their ancestors’ blackness nullified their Creek by blood status.
Instead, their case rests on an 1866 treaty between the US government and the Creek nation, which makes plain the nation’s thoughts on citizenship.
“[T]here are among the Creeks many persons of African descent,” the treaty notes, and lists Cow Tom as an official delegate of the Creeks.

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Sharon Lenzy-Scott, secretary of the Creek Freedmen Band in Oklahoma City. Photograph: Brett Deering/The Guardian
The treaty states that “persons lawfully residing in said Creek country” or even those who temporarily left, as well as their descendants, “may return within one year from the ratification of this treaty”, as can “their descendants and such others of the same race as may be permitted by the laws of the said nation to settle within the limits of the jurisdiction of the Creek nation as citizens”.
All descendants, the treaty adds, “shall have and enjoy all the rights and privileges of native citizens […] and the laws of the said nation shall be equally binding upon and give equal protection to all such persons, and all others, of whatsoever race or color, who may be adopted as citizens or members of said tribe”.
Solomon-Simmons says the Creek nation is “not a race, it’s a political entity, and they’ve got obligations”. His main claim is that that treaty is “still good law and hasn’t been abrogated”.
He anticipated the Creek nation’s arguments: “They’re going to say [they] have a right to determine who are citizens.” Technically, he agreed. “I believe that it is your right to determine citizenship like any other sovereign nation – but just like any other sovereign nation, not a race, you [the Creeks] signed a treaty.”
This isn’t Solomon-Simmons’ first legal battle with the Creek nation. In the early 2000s, he tried two cases somewhat similar to the one he filed this summer. But back then, he did so within the Creek nation’s judicial system, with two other descendants of black Creeks – Ron Graham and Fred Johnson – as his clients. After several bouts in the Creek nation judicial system, Solomon-Simmons lost the case.
The setback hasn’t stopped him. As he pushes forward with his case, he follows in the footsteps of two earlier activists, Rhonda Grayson and Sharon Lenzy.
Both are relatively unassuming women and trailblazing activists for citizenship rights of black Creeks.
Grayson, a financial manager of a delivery and repair service, grew up partly on the country roads of Wewoka, Oklahoma, where her great-grandmother, America Cohee lived.
Cohee “only spoke the Creek language and she only attended the Indian church”, Grayson told me as she stared at the picture, rubbing her hands along the glossy laminated frame. “She was 90 when we were kicked out of the nation.”

Rhonda Grayson, treasurer of the Creek Freedmen Band. Photograph: Brett Deering/The Guardian
As a young person, Grayson didn’t know about her family’s expulsion from the nation. It was only when she talked with her grandmother that she decided to start “doing my own research in the early 2000s by just going to the Oklahoma History Center”. She “wondered why my mother, my aunts, no one was enrolled in the tribe until someone at the history center told me that my family were on Creek freedmen rolls”.
Lenzy, a retired hospital manager, recalled her mother telling her of their ancestor Legus Choteau Perryman, a black man who served as principal chief of the Creek nation from 1887 to 1895.
She didn’t realize she was a black Creek member until 1979, because the distinction did not have much meaning before then. For Lenzy and her mother, she was Creek first.
When her official Creek mail stopped coming, “My mother called the Creek nation and they told [her and my grandmother] that they were freedmen and weren’t entitled to anymore checks,” Lenzy said.
Lenzy showed me a 1980 letter from the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs – which only affirmed what the nation told her mother. Despite numerous denied citizenship applications, Lenzy holds fast to something her mother told her: “Don’t forget your heritage and don’t let anyone tell you anything different.”
She and Grayson joined forces with other Creek descendants in 2012 to file for recognition, host national conferences, and create a documentary currently in development on the history of Creek freedmen.
Now, as named plaintiffs in Solomon-Simmons’ lawsuit, their motivation is clear: they want visibility.
“We are left out of Oklahoma history,” Grayson says. “It is a missing piece of history and it’s a valuable piece of history. Oklahoma history wouldn’t be – can’t be – history without the Creek freedmen.”
According to Alaina Roberts of the University of Pittsburgh, Native American nations “have always had this fear, and a valid fear, that when they accept black people as part of their tribe they are seen as not ‘Indian first’.”
Roberts explains that “Indian-ness is self-imposed as well as imposed from the outside: these nations have their own sense of who they are based on their culture and the traditions they have retained”, but also by the way they are legally recognized either by the state or federal government.
This legal recognition, which often meant the unfair takeover of settled land, represents an “imposition from outsiders – white outsiders – as to how much culture they’re retaining.”
In fact, in the minutes of a 1977 quarterly Creek national council meeting, the then principal chief Claude Cox expressed his concern with the former 1866 Treaty and associated constitution of 1867: “[W]hen you go back to the old constitution, you are licked before you start because it doesn’t talk about Indians, it talks about citizens,” he told the council.
Referring explicitly to black districts within the Creek community, he described his fear of being outnumbered: “f we want to keep the Indian in control, we’ve got to take a good look at this thing and get us a constitution that will keep the Creek Indian in control.”
But this isn’t just about identity, as identity parameters could dictate sharing in financial gains.
Roberts says the actual disenfranchisement of black people by the Creeks and the Cherokee started in the late 20th century coincided with a time when a lot of the tribes had begun to build their economies and make a lot of money. She points out this was precisely the time when many of the Nations started to see an “influx of enrollment applications”.
The current Creek principal chief, Jamie Floyd, declined to comment, and his press officers referred me to the nation’s citizenship office led by Nathan Wilson. “We’re an independent agency constitutionally and we’re listed in the Constitution as independent,” Wilson told me.
But the vagueness of the nation’s response shouldn’t be read as a dismissal of the importance of the citizenship issue. In fact, the Creek nation is lawyering up. Venable LLP, a top Washington DC law firm, contacted Solomon-Simmons in August on behalf of the Creek nation. Both the Creek nation and the interior department have filed motions to dismiss on 5 October and the court will respond on 2 November.
Creek leaders know that this won’t be an easy fight: the Cherokee nation and Seminole nation lost in 2017 on similar grounds.
For Solomon-Simmons, the case is clear-cut. His message to the Creek nation is succinct: “You have to follow the law like everybody else.”
America faces an epic choice...
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Rampant disinformation, partisan news sources and social media's tsunami of fake news is no basis on which to inform the American public in 2020. The need for a robust, independent press has never been greater, and with your support we can continue to provide fact-based reporting that offers public scrutiny and oversight. Our journalism is free and open for all, but it's made possible thanks to the support we receive from readers like you across America in all 50 states.

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roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Remember, history is told by the victors!! It's in the colonists best interest that the copper colour race to stay in a deep sleep!! Don't focus on the distractions we get hit with everyday, every min, every hour!! Teach yourself, when the media hits us with distractions, teach yourself to start looking all around you.. Then again, fall for the distractions and let these people you don't know keep fucking with your mindset
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Were being mislead on every level!! Break the Spell!! The truth is hidden in these free books you can check out the public library or for free in pdf file..Teach yourself and research your own family tree!! Then again dont and let these people you dont know or know your family tell you who you are and where you come from!!




The Seminoles

As is typical with nonsense White man history, there is a seeming need by Whites to denigrate Blacks, whereby any Blacks not in continental Africa, are declared to have been brought there as Slaves. This is not an innocent declaration brought about by ignorance. Quite the contrary, post Colombian Europeans encountered an Americas teeming with Blacks, they wrote about them, painted pictures of them, collected their artifacts, and also counted them in their census. Yet there are any number of Seminole histories, which declare that the so-called "Black Seminoles" are a tribe of run-away Slaves who latched onto the "Real" seminole tribe. Sadly, it may be that the seminoles themselves, like so many indigenous Black people, have lost their own history, and may not even know any better, thereby believing it.

But that bit of White man nonsense, is about as far away from the truth as you can get. According to scientific evidence, the Black Seminoles were the first people to settle in North America (Florida), at a time when the rest of the North was still under glaciers, more than 10,000 years ago. We cannot provide a history or culture for the Seminoles, because all available material is corrupted with nonsense like: they were run-away Slaves, they moved to Florida, the almost total confusion with neighboring Amerindian tribes etc.











 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
We gotta start understanding how the media is working against us in so many!!



Preferring Fantasy over Science

Something to ponder as you read these pages: We know of no source which insists Native Americans were exclusively the Mongol mulatto we know so well, like Geronimo and the like, except American Television and Movies. All other sources, like period ARTIFACTS and SCIENTIFIC studies, clearly show that Blacks were THE major component of the PaleoAmerican demographic.


Yet we see supposedly serious people, even some with a scholastic background, "Blow-off" these truths, to cling to the Hollywood fantasy of Tonto. That is where the term "Albino in Denial" comes in. It is not easy to see the lies which formed your reality, crumble before your eyes. Even some Negroes have the problem too, their reality has been shaped by the lies the Albinos taught them, so they too find it hard to grapple with the truth. May they all, one day find the strength to accept the truth.
 

Mrfreddygoodbud

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
We gotta start understanding how the media is working against us in so many!!



Preferring Fantasy over Science

Something to ponder as you read these pages: We know of no source which insists Native Americans were exclusively the Mongol mulatto we know so well, like Geronimo and the like, except American Television and Movies. All other sources, like period ARTIFACTS and SCIENTIFIC studies, clearly show that Blacks were THE major component of the PaleoAmerican demographic.


Yet we see supposedly serious people, even some with a scholastic background, "Blow-off" these truths, to cling to the Hollywood fantasy of Tonto. That is where the term "Albino in Denial" comes in. It is not easy to see the lies which formed your reality, crumble before your eyes. Even some Negroes have the problem too, their reality has been shaped by the lies the Albinos taught them, so they too find it hard to grapple with the truth. May they all, one day find the strength to accept the truth.
Funny how the Seminole war ....

Was known as the "negro war"

But somehow its impossible for the so called "indians" to be of the god race...

And Indians who the fuck came up with that shit

As if this is India

India is not even India

Its Hindustan...but I digress

Keep dropping them gems

Bruh
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Funny how the Seminole war ....

Was known as the "negro war"

But somehow its impossible for the so called "indians" to be of the god race...

And Indians who the fuck came up with that shit

As if this is India

India is not even India

Its Hindustan...but I digress

Keep dropping them gems

Bruh
Thats funny you said that.. I was just about to post something how columbus came up with the word indians.. Good reply, brotha..
 

ashimac

Rising Star
Platinum Member
Post it brother and please also post some links and books to read. Black grown man have to start reading more.
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Break the spell!! Snap outta the trance/illusion/dream.. Question Everything and Believe Nothing!! The Truth is right in front of US!!!


Black U.S. Indians and Paleoamericans

Paleoamerican is a classification term given to the first peoples who entered, and subsequently inhabited, the American continents during the final glacial episodes of the late Pleistocene period. They are known to be Black Polynesians and Australoids: but since those people are genetically and by remains phenotype, indistinguishable from the Black people still in Africa, it makes Africa a possible "Direct" source of Paleoamericans, perhaps the most likely, as it is much closer.


Why Christopher Columbus called them INDIANS!







 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
BREAK THE SPELL!!! Everything weve been taught in these schools are nothing but lies.. Its all public record, read the book a the early colonist that landed on our land and they will clearly tell you who they met when they got here!! Its all lies, half-truths, misinformation, told in reverse.. The system is banking on the masses to stay in a deep sleep!! They have stolen damn near everything from our people and put their name on it!! And people believe these colonist that for the most part, kicked outta europe and came to these lands and started inventing and building things!! No, they stole it all from our people(elders)!!



 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
I know sum folks dont give 2 fucks about this or have no clue about it!! Until you realize it was your elders. your tribe land they were giving away.. Yes, thats your shit!! But no, yall wanna listen to these people that are miseducating and mindfucking you as if they are your best friend!! Just remember the colonist came with flowers in their left hand and their right hand was behind their back with a ax in it!!

Now back to your regularly schedule PROGRAMMING!!



Paying to Play Indian: The Dawes Rolls and the Legacy of $5 Indians


Dawes rolls rife with ‘opportunistic white men’ and early appropriation.
It may be fashionable to play Indian now, but it was also trendy 125 years ago when people paid $5 apiece for falsified documents declaring them Native on the Dawes Rolls.

These so-called five-dollar Indians paid government agents under the table in order to reap the benefits that came with having Indian blood. Mainly white men with an appetite for land, five-dollar Indians paid to register on the Dawes Rolls, earning fraudulent enrollment in tribes along with benefits inherited by generations to come.
“These were opportunistic white men who wanted access to land or food rations,” said Gregory Smithers, associate professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth University. “These were people who were more than happy to exploit the Dawes Commission—and government agents, for $5, were willing to turn a blind eye to the graft and corruption.”
The Dawes Commission, established in 1893 to enforce the General Allotment Act of 1887 (or the Dawes Act), was charged with convincing tribes to cede their land to the United States and divide remaining land into individual allotments. The commission also required Indians to claim membership in only one tribe and register on the Dawes Rolls, what the government meant to be a definitive record of individuals with Indian blood.
The Curtis Act, passed in 1898, targeted the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole), forcing them to accept allotments and register on the Dawes Rolls. The two acts—which came during a “period of murky social context” after the Civil War when white and black men were intermarrying with Native American women, aimed to help the government keep track of “real” Indians while accelerating efforts to assimilate Indian people into white culture, Smithers said.

“By 1865, African Americans and white Americans were moving into the Midwest, into the Indian and Oklahoma territories, all vying for some patch of land they could call their own and live out their Jeffersonian view of independence,” he said. “The federal government poured a lot of effort and energy into the Dawes Commission, but at the same time it was very hard for both Native and American governments to keep track of who was who.”
The Dawes Commission set up tents in Indian Territory, said Bill Welge, director emeritus of the Oklahoma Historical Society’s Office of American Indian Culture and Preservation. There, field clerks scoured written records, took oral testimony and generated enrollment cards for individuals determined to have Indian blood.
That included authentic Indians, Welge said. But it also included lots of people with questionable heritage.

“Commissioners took advantage of their positions and enrolled people who had very minimal or questionable connections to the tribes,” he said. “They were not adverse to taking money under the table.”
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Research, research, research!! The one good thing about the internet, you can find out things the indoctrination centers are paid to not teach you or even expose you to any of this information!! WAKE UP!!! or stay sleeping... It all comes down to conditioning and programming, but getting the masses to see this is impossible!!!





 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Snap outta the trance, break the spell, wake up or whatever you call it!! These colonist along with their media, entertainment, indoctrination/conform/education, social media and so on.. Have been misleading us for along time.


 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
We've been and continue to be deceived on every level.. You dont need to be a professional researcher to figure this out!! Open your eyes, question everything, stop repeating the colonist view of history and our people, listen to your family members!! Always remember its in the colonist best interest that the copper color people/aboriginals/indigenous stay in a deep sleep, kept divided, distracted, miseducated, never find out his true story and sit in front of their televisions, laptops, tablets, cell phones, to be kept conditioned and programmed!!! As usual aint nobody listening!!



 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
You ever wonder how these people get so high up the ladder?? They sell the fuck out!!

 
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roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Its strange, the television, media/social media, entertainment, education, news and newsprint and so on... They tell us one thing and teach us another thing and bombarded our subconscious mind with images and false propaganda!! However, if you read the books by early colonist, so call historians, government documents and pictures, tell a whole different story.. Since the majority of population doesnt read or refuse to read, they are able to keep the illusion/dream alive and in full swing.
 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Snap outta the trance/illusion/dream!! They wanna keep our copper color people in a deep sleep,, so, we dont wake up and want our shit back!! Its right in front of to see.. Just use that good sense of discernment we were blessed with!!!

 

roots69

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Very interesting

Keep the facts coming
Right on, brotha.. Bruh, the school system, the corporation/colony, television, media/social media, entertainment industries have done a number on a large percentage of our people.. Its like they have them in a "Stockholm Syndrome" trance or dream state!! Sooner or later they have to snap outta trance,,,right??
 

Mrfreddygoodbud

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Right on, brotha.. Bruh, the school system, the corporation/colony, television, media/social media, entertainment industries have done a number on a large percentage of our people.. Its like they have them in a "Stockholm Syndrome" trance or dream state!! Sooner or later they have to snap outta trance,,,right??
Yeah that dream state is no joke....

That's why no more arguing for me..

I just state what I state and stay focused on my ascending above the illusion

Bruh when you start to wake up and notice that we waste a lot of energy on entities that do not deserve it

Fuck that

Aint knocking us off our game

Stay up
 

Diomedes3000

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
This thread is full of Black Indians. I get it escaped Africans who mixed with and lived among the Indians. Some were bought by the spanish. The Seminole war or Negro War as one white general called it was basically over slaves escaping to the swamps in Florida and joining the Seminole or living in villages close by them. I am not sure what else you are trying to say. We were not always here imo.
 
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