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BLACK SCIENCE FICTION, COMIC,FANTASY,HORROR, FUTURIST AUTHORS ETC...

ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member
I saw this video a few week ago,she was too goofy for my taste.I just don't understand this inclusive bullshit.


There is nothing wrong including other groups,but to go out of your way to include them is ridiculous.Asians and other groups have no problem not to include us in their novels,so I don't understand why we should go out of our way to include them.

I can't believe I actually watch this video without banging my head on a wall...
 

ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member



What is Steampunk?


Steampunk is a sub-genre of science fiction that typically features steam-powered machinery, especially in a setting inspired by industrialized Western civilization during the 19th century. The ‘steam’ in the term originates from the industrialized culture of the 19th century. The birth of steam engines. The latter part of the compound term ‘punk’ refers to the rebellious nature which is about challenging authority, do-it-yourself attitudes, and cultivating your own culture within a monotonous lackluster culture spear-headed by the status quo.

This subculture has also been highly influenced in the world of cyberspace and science fiction. Steampunk can take on many forms from attire worn in the Victorian era, American Western era, and Alternative Sci-Fi genres. The fantasy of the Steampunk subculture resides in a past that for most African Americans is a past we choose not to relive or even be a part of, even if its all in the name of being eccentric and fun. However, there is a culture within a subculture of African Americans who embrace Steampunk and many Black authors who have written books about it.

Milton Davis is an author of five books about science fiction and fantasy written from an African american perspective. He believes that steampunk explores an alternate historical aspect of the genre. “I see it as an opportunity to explore “what if” scenarios as they refer to the experiences of the African Diaspora.

Valjeanne Jeffers is also a sci-fi writer and poet who believes steampunk is a great way to stir up your imagination as a writer. She feels like steampunk wear is reminiscent of what hippies wore in the 70s. Her book The Switch, a story about a futuristic society that operates on two levels: an ultra rich “upper city,” and a dirt poor, steampunk, underground populated mostly by folks of color. The story has elements of erotica, espionage and even a little time travel.

Racialicious wrote an essay about the steampunk movement in Black culture back in 2009, and when you get some time to read it, I highly recommend that you do so, if you are interested in more detail about the movement and its influence on the Black community. The article does have a number of counter points to the idea that the movement is not always favorable to African Americans, but I disagree, as there are many Black men and women who are involved in steampunk and wear their attire proudly as well as respectfully see the subculture as completely inclusive to all races regardless of what history dictates

https://blackgirlnerds.com/steampunk/


article from 2013
 
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ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member
Black People Don’t Like Steampunk, Fantasy and Science Fiction!


At this year’s Dragon*Con, an author and Steampunk scholar I know posed the question: “How come black people don’t like the fantasy / sci fi genre? I mean, there are no sci fi / fantasy films directed, produced, or starring African Americans, so why aren’t they getting behind you and supporting Rite of Passage, a film written by, directed by, produced by and starring Black people?”

First, let me say that while a few people from all ethnic backgrounds have supported the making of Rite of Passage with in-kind donations or donations, the majority of that few has been of African descent. As far as why more Black people have not supported us, or why the majority of us don’t support independent, Black-created science fiction and fantasy films in general – because we do, indeed, support big-budget Hollywood science fiction films with our hard-earned dollars – I believe there are several factors at work.

In discussing this issue with co-creator of the Rite of Passage world, author, publisher and Executive Producer of Rite of Passage, Milton Davis, his opinion is that “Most Black people want reality. Many of us struggle to make ends meet; we’re living check to check; we’re facing getting our light turned off, so we don’t have time to delve into make believe.”



In regard to those Black people to whom Milton is referring, I believe a good dose of quality Science Fiction and Fantasy is exactly what they need. Science fiction and fantasy peek into the realm of possibility and an escape from the harshness and cruelty of the “real world”. Science Fiction and Fantasy stories deal with our real-world issues, but cover them in a veneer of the improbable and maybe even the impossible, thus making the bitter pill of life easier to swallow.

In traditional African cultures, it is through the telling of stories of heroism, bravery, the overcoming of overwhelming odds, magic, fearsome creatures, powerful artifacts and amazing technology that we instill good character in youth and encourage good character in everyone. My research tells me that the same is true of all cultures. Every culture on earth has its myths, fairytales and folklore and in most societies, djeli – bards, or griots who tell stories about a culture’s heroes, villains and history – are held in the highest regard.



Another reason why many Black people have not supported Rite of Passage is because in their minds, ultimately, they are not supposed to.

Why? Because Rite of Passage is Science Fantasy; it is Steamfunk, thus it is not “real enough” to the Black experience.

We often feel Science Fiction, Science Fantasy and Steamfunk are not “real enough” because most authors and filmmakers within those genres have not made room for an epic telling of a Black Fantasy and Science Fiction tale. We – the creators of Rite of Passage weren’t supposed to do this so, to many, the possibility of a group of Black people making an epic Science Fiction Film that is not only well-done, but is hotter than fish-grease, seems far-fetched.



A third reason – the reason why, surprisingly, most of our support has not come from the many fellow Black creators of science fiction and fantasy who know of Milton Davis’ and my work – is that there is a perception among many people that if a Black person makes a Science Fiction film – particularly Milton and I, who create stories for and about Black people – that story will have more to do with pushing some “Black agenda”, overcoming some great racial injustice, or other political issue than with telling a great story. While Rite of Passage is set in the time of Reconstruction; while it does deal with the issues of sexism and racism; it is first and foremost a great story, told in a dynamic, exciting and entertaining way.

Rite of Passage deals with universal issues that intrigue, encourage and plague us all.

After I gave my answer the Author / Steampunk Scholar had one more question: “Where can I donate to the making of Rite of Passage?”

https://chroniclesofharriet.com/2013/09/11/black-people-dont-like-steampunk/

http://dreamandhustle.com/2013/01/will-african-americans-get-hip-to-steampunk-in-2013/


Both articles from 2013








 

marcvoi

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
Black People Don’t Like Steampunk, Fantasy and Science Fiction!


At this year’s Dragon*Con, an author and Steampunk scholar I know posed the question: “How come black people don’t like the fantasy / sci fi genre? I mean, there are no sci fi / fantasy films directed, produced, or starring African Americans, so why aren’t they getting behind you and supporting Rite of Passage, a film written by, directed by, produced by and starring Black people?”

First, let me say that while a few people from all ethnic backgrounds have supported the making of Rite of Passage with in-kind donations or donations, the majority of that few has been of African descent. As far as why more Black people have not supported us, or why the majority of us don’t support independent, Black-created science fiction and fantasy films in general – because we do, indeed, support big-budget Hollywood science fiction films with our hard-earned dollars – I believe there are several factors at work.

In discussing this issue with co-creator of the Rite of Passage world, author, publisher and Executive Producer of Rite of Passage, Milton Davis, his opinion is that “Most Black people want reality. Many of us struggle to make ends meet; we’re living check to check; we’re facing getting our light turned off, so we don’t have time to delve into make believe.”



In regard to those Black people to whom Milton is referring, I believe a good dose of quality Science Fiction and Fantasy is exactly what they need. Science fiction and fantasy peek into the realm of possibility and an escape from the harshness and cruelty of the “real world”. Science Fiction and Fantasy stories deal with our real-world issues, but cover them in a veneer of the improbable and maybe even the impossible, thus making the bitter pill of life easier to swallow.

In traditional African cultures, it is through the telling of stories of heroism, bravery, the overcoming of overwhelming odds, magic, fearsome creatures, powerful artifacts and amazing technology that we instill good character in youth and encourage good character in everyone. My research tells me that the same is true of all cultures. Every culture on earth has its myths, fairytales and folklore and in most societies, djeli – bards, or griots who tell stories about a culture’s heroes, villains and history – are held in the highest regard.



Another reason why many Black people have not supported Rite of Passage is because in their minds, ultimately, they are not supposed to.

Why? Because Rite of Passage is Science Fantasy; it is Steamfunk, thus it is not “real enough” to the Black experience.

We often feel Science Fiction, Science Fantasy and Steamfunk are not “real enough” because most authors and filmmakers within those genres have not made room for an epic telling of a Black Fantasy and Science Fiction tale. We – the creators of Rite of Passage weren’t supposed to do this so, to many, the possibility of a group of Black people making an epic Science Fiction Film that is not only well-done, but is hotter than fish-grease, seems far-fetched.



A third reason – the reason why, surprisingly, most of our support has not come from the many fellow Black creators of science fiction and fantasy who know of Milton Davis’ and my work – is that there is a perception among many people that if a Black person makes a Science Fiction film – particularly Milton and I, who create stories for and about Black people – that story will have more to do with pushing some “Black agenda”, overcoming some great racial injustice, or other political issue than with telling a great story. While Rite of Passage is set in the time of Reconstruction; while it does deal with the issues of sexism and racism; it is first and foremost a great story, told in a dynamic, exciting and entertaining way.

Rite of Passage deals with universal issues that intrigue, encourage and plague us all.

After I gave my answer the Author / Steampunk Scholar had one more question: “Where can I donate to the making of Rite of Passage?”

https://chroniclesofharriet.com/2013/09/11/black-people-dont-like-steampunk/

http://dreamandhustle.com/2013/01/will-african-americans-get-hip-to-steampunk-in-2013/


Both articles from 2013







Great article
 

marcvoi

Rising Star
BGOL Investor

ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member
Repainting My Imagination With Black Fantasy Authors



In fourth grade, I was introduced to fantasy fiction through The Harry Potter series. I became a fan of the series when the fourth book was the latest book released. There was something irresistible about Harry’s world that I couldn’t explain. When I read the first three books, everything I read vividly appeared in my mind in bright colors. Once things got darker with the fourth books, the colors shone like stars in new characters and gave me hope for those I already knew.




I loved how Harry’s world painted my imagination with its characters and creatures. As I waited for the newest book in the series to be released, I decided to maintain that feeling by reading other fantasy series such as Percy Jackson and The Olympians and certain Dragonlance trilogies. Together with the Harry Potter series, these books painted my imagination into a lovely kaleidoscope and also sparked an interest in mythology and folklore.





For a while, race wasn’t an issue for me when it came to characters. I related to things that went beyond skin color, like Hermione’s brain and her being put down because of it. In high school, I realized I couldn’t find any characters of color I could relate to in contemporary teen fiction. Due to the lack of diversity in diverse characters, I looked to white characters even more.



After Harry’s adventures ended in my junior year of high school, I found one or two other series that I enjoyed. Then, I started to get bored with fantasy fiction. I was tired of the same old strong female characters and books with vampires, fairies, and demons. After a while, even fantasy series I loved to reread also became boring.



I wanted something new, but wasn’t sure what it was. Then last year, I watched the animated series W.I.T.C.H. on YouTube and found myself relating to Taranee Cook, a black female main character who could control fire. That’s when I realized that I wanted to read fantasy fiction with people of color.



On Goodreads, I requested fantasy fiction books written by African American authors and ended up reading Sister Mine by Nalo Hopkinson. While it took me a few chapters to get into the book, I found myself experiencing the same thrill I got from reading the Harry Potter books. However, the lack of fantasy fiction by black authors at my local libraries and my picky reading taste prevented me from finding more books.



It wasn’t until this summer that I was able to find more enjoyable fantasy fiction by black authors. Through the site Black Girl Nerds, I discovered Kyoko M. and her urban fantasy trilogy The Black Parade. The main character was Jordan Amador, a twenty-something black-Latina who could see ghosts, demons, and angels.



As I read the first book of the series, I found myself admiring how she fought demons inside and outside of herself. By the end of the book, I found myself wanting more and happily bought the second book of the trilogy, She Who Fights Monsters, when it was released in July. I also promoted the author on my blog with a book review of the first book.



Besides The Black Parade trilogy, I found other black fantasy fiction authors through the blog The Chronicles of Harriet, which introduced me to the genres sword and soul and steamfunk. Sword and soul had stories set in alternate versions of Africa and featured black men and women equipped with magic, swords, and spears. Steamfunk provides a different take on the steampunk genre with African American history and culture.



Although both genres sounded interesting, sword and soul was the genre I was most excited about. I researched black authors such as Charles Saunders, Milton J. Davis, and Balogun Ojetade. In addition, I also read a book on African mythology in order to be familiar with the myths they might draw on.







In order to get my feet wet in sword and soul, I bought the book Once Upon a Time in Afrika by Balogun Ojetade. From the first chapter, my imagination was painted with wonderful characters and places. I read the book in two or three days and did a book review to spread the word about it.



After I finished the book, I bought the anthology Griots: Sisters of the Spear to read sword and soul stories focusing on black women. I recently started to read it since October is Black Speculative Fiction Month and I’m awed at what I’ve read so far.



Black fantasy authors have repainted my imagination with fresh images of magic, horror, strength, and more. They have shown me that with creativity, black people can create a new view of their past, present, and future.



https://blackgirlnerds.com/repainting-imagination-black-fantasy-authors/

article from 2014
 

ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member
WHAT IS STEAMFUNK? Exposing the Big Steampunk Lie!

Exposing the Big Steampunk Lie!




Steamfunk is defined as a philosophy or style of writing and visual aesthetic that combines the African and / or African American culture and approach to life with that of the steampunk philosophy and / or steampunk fiction and cosplay.

For those who do not yet know what Steampunk is, you can read my blog – Why I Love Steampunk – here: https://chroniclesofharriet.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/state-of-black-sci-fi-2012-why-i-love-steampunk/.

Steampunk has the power to rip open the 19th Century’s belly and examine its clockwork guts – and to rearrange those guts in new ways – but most Steampunk authors – and indeed most Steampunks – choose to avoid the issues of racism, sexism, classism, colonialism and imperialism.

Steamfunk authors – thankfully – choose to address these very same issues, for we know that to avoid them – especially since there is such a wealth of Steampunk tales to be told from a Black perspective – is to perpetuate the Big Steampunk Lie.


Yes…lie; a lie by omission; also known as the ‘suppression of evidence’.

This type of lie is more subtle. It has the advantage that you can’t get caught in a lie, because everything that you say is true. You just fail to mention all of those bothersome little facts that do not support your point of view. Should someone point out one of those annoying – and unmentioned – facts, you can feign innocent ignorance, or claim that the fact is really just an unimportant, trivial detail, not worth mentioning.

Thus the Victorian Era / Wild West are represented in most Steampunk as merely an age of exploration and invention. A renaissance, if you will. A very interesting – and deceptive – way of describing an era in which the “explorers” who at best unintentionally – and at worst, and far more often, very intentionally – brought with them the forces of colonialism and imperialism throughout the world.

The “Wild West” of North America systematically robbed the indigenous people of their lands and murdered them wholesale while also oppressing and vilifying Asians. In the South and East of North America, people of African descent suffered horrors under the yoke of chattel slavery and things did not get much better after the Civil War. To romanticize such an era; to paint such a dystopian reality as a rose-colored (well, various shades of brown in Steampunk) utopia is the ‘Big Steampunk Lie’ of which I speak.

Now, I am not saying all Steampunk stories should be dark and foreboding. However, we should tackle issues of race, sex and class in our stories to some degree. So many incredible and thought-provoking stories are waiting to be told…if we care to tell them.

With the upcoming Steamfunk Anthology and with such already released novels as Moses: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman, by Yours Truly and The Switch, by Valjeanne Jeffers – along with a number of awesome short stories from Milton Davis, Maurice Broaddus, NK Jemisin, Malon Edwards and Balogun (me) – these stories, which must be told, will be shouted from our Funkadelic Airships.

Full steam ahead!


https://chroniclesofharriet.com/2012/04/05/what-is-steamfunk-exposing-the-big-steampunk-lie/


article from 2012
 

melonpecan

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
The “Wild West” of North America systematically robbed the indigenous people of their lands and murdered them wholesale while also oppressing and vilifying Asians. In the South and East of North America, people of African descent suffered horrors under the yoke of chattel slavery and things did not get much better after the Civil War. To romanticize such an era; to paint such a dystopian reality as a rose-colored (well, various shades of brown in Steampunk) utopia is the ‘Big Steampunk Lie’ of which I speak.
I have taken in interest in steampunk for a few years now because reimagining history in any form I think is a very daunting task. However I have never thought of it this way...and this line, to think that the steampunk work is literally through shades of brown while fantasizing the oppression of brown skin is throwing my Sunday morning out the window.

I...almost feel the need to write again...
 

ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member
DO BLACK PEOPLE REALLY DO THIS STUFF? Black Steampunks and Steamfunkateers


For as long as I can remember, I have been a fan of what is commonly called Steampunk – a mash-up of fantasy and science fiction that embraces a fantastical past while incorporating a spirit of progress, exploration and do-it-yourself ingenuity.

Always a voracious reader, I devoured the classic works that continue to inspire Steampunk and Steamfunk – Jules Vernes’ From the Earth to the Moon, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea and Around the World in 80 Days; Mary Shelley’s Frankensteinand HG Wells’ The Time Machine.

One of my childhood rituals was to sit at the feet of my mother and, together, we would watch The Wild, Wild West. My mother, a huge fan of westerns (she has probably seen every western ever made in English…yes, really) and comedic spy stories (Get Smart and I Spy are her favorites) was in heaven watching James West and Artemus Gordon solve crimes, protect the President, and foil the plans of megalomaniacal villains, with the help of Verne-esque, technologically advanced devices, sharp wits and superior fighting skills.

In my preteens, I was the first of my friends to break away from Dungeons and Dragonsin search of a game that allowed me to create a world more like that of The Wild, Wild West, in which espionage, steam power, trains and amazing gadgets were some of the tropes. I could not find such a game, so I included these elements in the TSR game set in the Wild West, Boot Hill (also created by Gary Gygax, the creator of D&D) and it quickly became a hit with my friends.

As an adult, when I decided to write my first novel I knew three things – I wanted the hero to be Harriet Tubman; I wanted Harriet to be an ass-kicking monster-hunter and freedom fighter; and I wanted the story to include amazing gadgets and over-the-top villains a la…you guessed it…The Wild, Wild West. Thus, the beginnings of Moses: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman took form in my mind. Years later, I sent the first book in the series to independent publisher, Mocha Memoirs Press. The Editor-In-Chief of the company, Nicole Kurtz, wrote me saying they loved the story and were looking for more Steampunk stories like mine. “Steampunk?” I immediately hopped online and began my search and found a wealth of information on the movement.

My next search was “Black authors of Steampunk”, which did not yield much, however it did take me to an article written by an incredible writer by the name of Jha – who I later discovered is one of the leading authorities on Steampunk, Jaymee Goh – whose informative and inspiring work helped me to find other Steampunk People of Color. You should read her article – The Intersection of Race and Steampunk: Colonialism’s After-Effects & Other Stories, from a Steampunk of Colour’s Perspective [Essay].



Shortly after finding the article by Jah, I was fortunate to find other writers of African descent who write Steampunk. I was so happy I was not alone and that I could read works of Steampunk that included heroes who look like me.

Since that time, I have developed friendships and working relationships with most of the Black authors and artists who write Steampunk and – through the genius and diligence of these same authors and artists, we have successfully created a subgenre of Steampunk that is a movement within a movement – Steamfunk.

Recently, author Milton Davis and I co-edited and contributed to the definitive work in the subgenre, the anthology Steamfunk!. We are now working together on a feature film based on a story that Milton wrote and a world we have built also based on that story. Rite of Passage, which we are producing in partnership with GA-Tech is sure to be a powerhouse of entertainment and education and will incite much thought, emotion, conversation and – hopefully – action upon its worldwide release.

Following is a list of Black people who are helping to move Steampunk and Steamfunk forward and to elevate the quality of these sibling movements.

Milton Davis



Milton is a chemist by day and a writer / publisher by night and on the weekends. All of his works are self-published through his company, MVmedia, LLC.

He is co-producer and executive producer of the Steamfunk films, Rite of Passage: Initiationand Rite of Passage.

He is contributing co-editor of the anthology, Steamfunk! and author and / or publisher of seven other books, which are all masterful works of Sword and Soul – African inspired heroic and epic fantasy.

Milton is an active historian and educator on the topics of Steamfunk and Sword and Soul.

Valjeanne Jeffers



Valjeanne Jeffers, author of the erotic horror series, Immortal. The fourth book in that series – Collision of Worlds – is Steamfunk. She is also author of the Steamfunk novels, The Switch I andThe Switch II: Clockwork.

Valjeanne also works as an editor of Steamfunk and other genres of fiction and is co-owner of Q and V Affordable Editing.

At present, Valjeanne is putting the finishing touches on her next novel – Mona Livelong – a mash-up of Steamfunk and horror.

Luisa Ana Fuentes



Luisa Ana Fuentes – aka Dorothy Winterman – is a New York-based attorney, Steampunk and owner of the Hattitude store.

A true Renaissance Woman, Luisa is also an opera/Broadway show tune singing, belly dancing, martial artist who speaks several languages, loves metal and Rasputina and Kletzmer music.

A long-time fan of cosplay and Live-Action Role-Playing (LARPing), Luisa says “I’ve LARPed, RenFaired, CosPlayed, ComicConed and so forth and so on. STEAMPUNK/GOTH/NEO-VICTORIAN has won me over.”

Needing an outlet for her creativity – and relief for her stress – Luisa began making her own costumes. She now runs a successful hat making business but still makes time to fabricate her own beautiful clothing and accessories.

Luisa’s Steamfunk persona is Dorothy Winterman, a Steampunk Dahomey Amazon, a character who came to her in a dream. According to Luisa, “…one evening I awoke from a dream. In that dream, Miss Winterman was standing among bodies of White men in differing military uniforms. They were dead or dying. I/Miss Winterman had a cross bow with a red laser light shooting out its pinpoint accuracy onto a Joshua tree not too far ahead. I stood, Captain Morgan-like on what I knew to be a Dutch military man. All around me were clearly African women soldiers all dressed alike with the same or similar weaponry, but likewise standing as I was upon the chests of other fallen European male soldiers. We all shouted and whooped and hollered in victory-my sisters and I. We had defeated our enemies and Africa (yes, all of Africa) was safe from continued plunder and rape.”

Luisa also wears a beautiful outfit that combines the looks of Cherokee, Taino and Caribe Indian warriors, with whom she also shares heritage.

Tony Ballard-Smoot of Airship Archon



The famed, Ohio-based Steampunk crew, Airship Archon, is helmed by Captain Anthony LaGrange, nom de plume for Tony Ballard-Smoot, a maker, model and ambassador and activist for the Steampunk Community as a whole.

Captain LaGrange founded Airship Archon in 2008 and is a popular panelist at Steampunk conventions.

Mr. Ballard-Smoot believes that Steampunk is unique among other cultural movements. He says “Steampunk is doing something fantastic that a lot of other movements have not done – create a community. You have a lot of scenes out there: the goth scene, punk scene, hipster scene but none of them have evolved into an actual community or family.”

Nivatima “Nivi” Hicks




Truly a creative genius, Nivi Hicks wears many hats; and wears them quite well. She is a world renowned cosplay model, cosplay costume designer and fabricator, mother and Director of Utah’s popular fan convention, the first such convention ever in the state of Utah – the Salt City Steam Fest.

She says of Steampunk – “Steampunk, to me, is my outlet, my muse, and my friend. It’s been something I can say in regards to a hobby and a genre of interest I have been interested in for the longest time.”



Nivi is an all-around great person – humble and always offering a kind and encouraging word to fellow Steampunks and Steamfunkateers.

Mr.Saturday



Born Pablo Miguel Alberto Vazquez III, Mr. Saturday – founder and con-chair of Aetherfest, Texas’ first Steampunk convention – is a strong voice in the movement.

With his creative partner, Sixpence, Mr. Saturday leads the San Antonio Neo Victorian Association, a large group of Texas Steampunks who have taken it upon themselves to spread Steampunk throughout Texas and beyond. Also, with Sixpence, Mr. Saturday hosts brilliant and witty Steampunk performances at fan conventions across the country.

A friend, Mr. Saturday – along with Jaymee Goh, Diana Pho aka Ay-Leen, the Peacemaker and Savan Gupta, aka A Count Named Slick Brass (Savan Gupta is actually creator of SteamFunk Studios and SteamFunk, a separate, but just as awesome movement as Steamfunk) – has been extremely supportive of Steamfunk and when I was new to Steampunk, he was one of the icons of the movement who spread the word about Steamfunk and my work in it.

About Steampunk, he has this to say – “Steampunk, I would say, is one of the more political “geek” subcultures out there. I never shy away from sharing my politics and views in any situation and Steampunk is no exception.” He further states “…there is no room for racism, sexism, elitism and various other cruel prejudices out there, within our community and we must do our best to prevent such counter-revolutionary efforts…”



Shamus Tinplate, aka Tony Hicks of Tinplate Studios



Mr. Hicks is an ingenious artist of immense skill and creativity.

He is a comic book and natural science illustrator, sculptor and bodger (woodworker). His influences range from Charles Darwin to H.P. Lovecraft to Clement Ader.

Like many others (this author included), Mr. Hicks was a lover of Steampunk before the term was ever coined. He says: “As a small child, I watched 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and fell head first into the waters of Steampunk, from which I have yet to resurface.”

Mr. Hicks’ work consists of Steampunk ray guns, respirators, odd gadgets, and masks as well as disturbing cryptozoological anomalies under glass and ocular oddities.

You can find Mr. Hicks at all manner of Steampunk and art conventions, fairs, festivals, shows, and other special events. As Shamus Tinplate, he is proprietor of Tinplate Studios, which sells Mr. Hicks’ incredible work.

Kimberly Richardson



Kimberly Richardson grew up an eccentric woman with a taste for listening to dark cabaret music while drinking tea, reading books in every genre, and writing stories.

Her first book, the award-winning Tales From a Goth Librarian, was published in 2009. She is editor of the wildly popular steampunk anthologies, Dreams of Steam 1-4.

In her precious, but little spare time, she enjoys all things Steampunk, Gothic, eccentric and eclectic. At present, Kimberly resides in Memphis, Tennessee.

Stanley “Standingo” Weaver



The incomparable artist Stanley J. Weaver, Jr. had his first encounter with comic book heroes at the age of five, when his parents bought him his very first action figure – the Incredible Hulk.

That toy awakened the artist in young Standingo and he immediately started drawing…on his parents’ wall.

After awakening from the knockout blow delivered by his mom, Stan staggered to school, where he discovered an armless Spiderman action figure in the trash can. He retrieved Spidey from the detritus and took him home so he could draw him as well.

At ten years of age, Stan acquired his first comic book, when he saw an Incredible Hulkcomic book at the local candy store and begged his father to buy it for him. It was then that Stan concluded that he wanted to draw comic books.

After unsuccessfully pursuing a career with Marvel, DC and Milestone comics – who told him he had tons of talent, but still was not good enough for them (they were wrong) – the disheartened Stan did not pick up a pencil to draw for the next five years.

In 2005, at the age of 32, Stan’s passion to draw was reignited, but this time, he was determined to remain independent and to create works on his terms. And boy, are we happy he made that decision! Stan is one of the most prolific artists in the business and is one of the premier artists in indie comics and genre fiction.

Stan has done the covers for several popular graphic novels and novels, including the Steamfunk series, The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman and the Sword and Soul novel, Once Upon A Time in Afrika, for which his work was nominated for best cover by the prestigious Pulp Ark Awards. Recently, Stan completed the beautiful cover for author Milton Davis’ Steamfunk series, From Here to Timbuktu.

Marcellus Shane Jackson



Marcellus Shane Jackson, was considered a prodigy in the arts as a young child and has gone on to build a stellar career in visual and commercial art and illustration.

He is highly sought after for his skills and has been commissioned by the NBA and the High Museum of Art.

His work can be seen on the covers of numerous magazines and books and in animation and designs for top apparel companies.

Marcellus is committed to developing the next generation of artists by sharing his experience and expertise as a judge for art competitions and as a panelist at conventions and festivals.

We were fortunate to commission Marcellus for the beautiful and beloved cover of the Steamfunk anthology and look forward to working with him on many more Steamfunk projects in the near future!

Mark Curtis



Mark Curtis, who has cosplayed a number of Blacknificent characters, such as Steampunk Lando Calrissian, complete with cans of Colt 45 and the Steampunk Massai, is truly a creative genius.

A popular prop maker, costume fabricator and mover and shaker at fandom conventions, Mark and his wife, Theresa, are true icons – and all around wonderful people – in the movement.

We were elated when Mark agreed to play the vampire Greasy Grant in the Steamfunk feature film, Rite of Passage. Mark agreed to take on the role of the vampire mob boss mainly because he is an admirer of famed African American lawman, Bass Reeves and says he will be honored to be killed by the legendary U.S. Marshal.

Vernard Martin



Vernard Martin – aka The Professor – is Interim Crafts editor for the Steampunk Chronicle and co-Cog-spinner for the SPC website.

He spends his day time hours pondering the mysteries of the Aether at the Emory Center for Comprehensive Informatics. His night time hours are dedicated to the enlightenment of students at local universities.

Steampunk evangelist, costume designer, maker, corset inspector, mixologist, computer jock and run-of-the-mill knowledge geek, Vernard is a popular and highly active Steampunk.



https://chroniclesofharriet.com/2013/06/18/steamfunkateers/


article came out June 18,2013
 

ansatsusha_gouki

R.I.P. D.T.
Platinum Member
I have taken in interest in steampunk for a few years now because reimagining history in any form I think is a very daunting task. However I have never thought of it this way...and this line, to think that the steampunk work is literally through shades of brown while fantasizing the oppression of brown skin is throwing my Sunday morning out the window.

I...almost feel the need to write again...

I got an idea for a steampunk book,but trying to organize my thoughts for it.

I even drew a dayum map for it....:giggle:
 
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