African American History aka Black History & History of Afrikans World Wide

Mrfreddygoodbud

Rising Star
BGOL Investor
I Know for a fact now our history is a Moorish history..

FBI confirmed that shit...

Oleg and Moorish history somehow cac academia cant seem to find it..

Let you know where the cover up begins...

The FBI. Confirmed it by labeling Moorish Americans terrorist...

They fucked up big time
 

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Game with Dice
Game with dice from the Temple of Bes at Bawiti. Late Period, 26th Dynasty, ca. 664-525 BC. Bahariya Oasis, Giza.

Photo: Sandro Vannini
 

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Triangular Level and Plumb Bob
This wooden triangle is part of the construction equipment that was used to ensure that all walls were smooth and perfectly aligned. The tool consists of three pieces: two of them were fixed together to form a right angle, while the third small piece serves as a crossbar.

A limestone bob is suspended by a cord from the apex of the right angle. Placed against a perfectly flat wall, the string of the bob would fall between the two lines indicated on the crossbar.

From El Lahun. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, ca. 1550-1292 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 28782
 

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Egypt Museum
Ancient Egyptian Arts, Culture and History ☥
Egypt Museum

Ancient Egyptian Numbers
Relief depicts ancient Egyptian numbers, detail of a carving on the Third Pylon of Amenhotep III, Karnak Temple Complex.

#ancient egypt#amenhotep iii#18th dynasty#egyptian#numbers#karnak

Seated Statues of Rahotep and Nofret
Rahotep might have been a son of King Sneferu and thus, a brother of King Khufu. He held the titles of High Priest of Ra at Heliopolis, General of the Army, and Chief of Constructions. He is seen here wearing a short kilt, short hair, a fine mustache, and a heart-shaped amulet around his neck.

Rahotep’s wife, Nofret, is described as “the one acquainted to the king.” She is seen wearing a shoulder-length wig, decorated with a floral diadem and a broad collar. Her natural hair can be seen under the wig. We recognize the distinction in the skin coloring of the two statues: reddish brown for the man and cream wash for the woman. This was an artistic convention followed throughout ancient Egyptian history.

The colors are well preserved and the faces have realistic expressions. The torchlight reflecting on the inlaid eyes of these two statues caused the workmen who first gazed at them to be afraid

Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. CG 3, 4

#ancient egypt#rahotep#nofret#4th dynasty#old kingdom#sculpture

Basin with a Boat from the Tomb of Tutankhamun
It is considered one of the most beautiful pieces of the collection of king Tutankhamun. It was found in the annex of his tomb.

The purpose of this artifact is not clear, but it was either an unguent container or a perfume holder or most probably it was a centerpiece used during celebrations and ceremonies for decoration purposes because when Howard Carter found it, it was covered with garlands of flowers. It is thought that this basin might have been filled with water to complete the image of the decorative centerpiece.

At the prow a naked girl with a curly wig, wearing earrings, armlets and bracelets, is represented seated and holding in her hand a blue lotus. At the stern, there is a dwarf standing naked and he is wearing a wig similar to the one worn by the girl. He is also wearing armlets and bracelets. When this piece was first discovered, he was holding a pole in his hand and most probably he was the helmsman who directed the boat.

From the Tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62). Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 62120

Photo: Jon Berghoff

#ancient egypt#tutankhamun#18th dynasty#boat#alabaster

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut
A grand expression of royal power, aerial view of Hatshepsut’s mortuary temple rises against a desert bluff at Deir el-Bahari. Reliefs in the porticoes record the greatest triumphs of her 21-year reign.

Photo: Kenneth Garrett

#ancient egypt#hatshepsut#18th dynasty#history#temple

Queen Kawit at her Toilet
Kawit, queen consort of king Mentuhotep II, shown on her sarcophagus having her hair dressed. From the tomb of Kawit, Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes.

Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, ca. 2061-2010 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 47397

#ancient egypt#kawit#11th dynasty#queen#relief
egypt-museum

egypt-museum
Eye of Horus Amulet
Carnelian wadjet amulet (eye of Horus). One side is carved with details. Slightly curved profile and not pierced for suspension. Broken across in two pieces and mended together.

In ancient Egypt, people wear carnelian to ward off the Evil Eye and instill peace. The ancient Egyptians called carnelian “the setting sun”.

Wadjet eye amulets were among the most popular amulets of ancient Egypt. The wadjet eye represents the healed eye of the god Horus and embodies healing power as well as regeneration and protection in general.

Late Period, ca. 664-332 BC. Now in the World Museum, National Museums Liverpool. M11921

#ancient egypt#amulet
#ancient egypt#games#26th dynasty#late period#dice

“What is the Tekenu? What was its function? What are its origins? These are questions upon which Egyptologists have long pondered. However, Egyptologists, until now, have avoided any major work on the topic. Previous treatments of the Tekenu largely adopt a selective approach focusing on a specific form. Rarely has the Tekenu been examined profoundly in all of its forms or contexts with its possible origins commented upon merely in passing.

The aim of The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual is to provide a provocative examination and interpretation of the Tekenu in an endeavour to proffer plausible answers hitherto eluding scholars. Attested from the Fifth Dynasty until, and including the Saite Period, the Tekenu is a puzzling icon which is depicted within the funerary scenes in the tombs of some ancient Egyptian nobles.

In this work four distinct types of Tekenu are identified and classified and then a Corpus Catalogue is formed. The Tekenu is appraised within the context of the wall scene. Two tombs are dealt with in greater detail.”

The Tekenu and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Ritual, by Glennise West

#ancient egypt#books#ritual#death#tekenu
egypt-museum

egypt-museum
Relief of a Man Milking a Cow
Relief depicting a man milking a cow, detail of a carving on the sarcophagus of Queen Kawit, from the tomb of Kawit, Deir el-Bahari, West Thebes.

Middle Kingdom, 11th Dynasty, ca. 2061-2010 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 47397
 

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#ancient egypt#kawit

Unearthed Statue of Amenhotep III
The face of the colossal alabaster statue of Amenhotep III (r. ca. 1391-1353 BC) wearing a Nemes headdress and a royal beard.

Found some 200 meters (656 feet) behind the Colossi of Memnon near the third pylon of his mortuary temple at Kom el-Hettan, West Thebes, 2011​
 

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CHINESE ORIGINS
Genetic analysis points towards a divergence of all ancient Native Americans from a single east Asian source population somewhere between 36,000 to 25,000 years ago—well before humans crossed into Beringia, an area that includes the land bridge connecting Siberia and Alaska at the end of the last ice age...
These humans were genetically distinct from all other Native Americans around 20,000 years ago...

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2018/01/alaska-dna-ancient-beringia-genome/


A genetic study done by researchers from all over the world: China, Japan, U.S.A. U.K. and other countries, and published in 2001; definitively answered the question of East Asian origins...
The findings were that the original East Asians were 100% pure African, with absolutely no outside admixture - But here again, we are talking about the ORIGINAL East Asians, modern East Asians are quite different...
In 2001, many of the worlds leading genetic researchers produced a study which clearly showed that East Asians, descended from Africans...
The Khoe and Saake have by genetic analysis been determined to be the closest to the original Homo-sapien sapien in genetic makeup, and thus, the worlds Oldest Humans...
The 2nd Out Of Africa migration event saw Africans with “Mongol features" (Khoe & Saake) take an "Inland route" through southern Asia and on up to China, where they settled...
The 2nd wave of migration occurred about 60-50,000 B.C.
These may have been big game hunters who followed an inland route in search of game; they reached China by about 50-45,000 B.C.

 

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These Black & White photos are taken from the multi-volume book “Tribes and Castes of the Southern Provinces of India” by Edgar Thurston, published in 1907...
There are many different groups of so called Black folks living in India:
The Siddis, The Dalits (The so-called “Untouchables”) The Baiga, and The Bonda...




 

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Crime October 23, 2019 10 Worst Massacres Of African-Americans [DISTURBING IMAGES]

Michael Van Duisen



The new HBO series “Watchmen” opens with unspeakable violence: a retelling of an infamous incident of racial violence in American history. Unfortunately, they had any number of violent outbursts to choose from. Here are 10 of the worst massacres of African-Americans.
SEE ALSO: 10 Lesser Known Massacres

10 Rosewood Massacre
rosewood massacre
A small, overwhelmingly black town in Florida, Rosewood was essentially completely destroyed in January of 1923. In the nearby town of Sumner, a 22-year-old white woman named Fannie Taylor was heard screaming and, when her neighbor came to check on her, she was covered in bruises. Claiming to have been assaulted by a black man , she reported that she had not been raped, though the other white citizens in her town believed otherwise.
Her husband gathered a group of Sumner residents and began searching the area for a black prisoner who was said to have escaped a nearby chain gang. Additionally, around 500 members of the KKK were in the area and they joined the mob which eventually decided the town of Rosewood was hiding the target of their ire. Eventually, they reached the town and began terrorizing those they suspected of aiding the escaped prisoner, beating, torturing and even killing some of them. After some white people were killed by those defending themselves, the choice was made to burn the town to the ground.
In all, anywhere from 6 to 27 black people were killed, with the rest escaping with their lives but none of their possessions, as many of them refused to return to the area, fearful of more violence.[1]
9 Atlanta Race Riot
Fearful of the growing power of the black citizens of Atlanta, the white elites in the city began using the local newspapers to push their racially motivated opinions. The governor’s race of 1906 was especially repugnant, as various newspapermen utilized their positions to help their campaigns by spreading false information about the state of race relations in Atlanta. A favorite of theirs: any lurid tale of a “pure” white woman being assaulted by a black man.
No one particular story sparked this riot but tensions rose to a breaking point on September 22nd. Eventually, white mobs began terrorizing majority-black neighborhoods, setting fire to any black business they could find and beating and shooting those unlucky enough to cross their path. By the time a heavy rain dispersed most of the crowds, the state militia had showed up and restored order. However, small pockets of violence remained for the next two days and, in the end, as many as 40 African-Americans lost their lives.[2]

8 Thibodaux Massacre
Less than two decades after slavery was outlawed in the United States, many African-Americans working in the South began to realize the power their labor represented. This led to an increasing number of strikes, especially amongst sugar workers. In 1887, some sugar workers reached out to the Knights of Labor, the biggest union of them all. With the help of organized labor, the black workers soon began to demand appropriate wages.
Instead of negotiating, the plant owners began firing union members. When strikes began, they also hired strike-breakers and created militias, armed to the teeth and out for blood. On November 23rd, a mob of white men dragged a number of black workers from their houses and led them to the railroads. Once they arrived, the men were told to run for their lives, before they were all shot in the back by the armed mob. By the time the violence died down, at least 35 people had died. Defeated and cowed, the workers all went back to the plantations and not one person faced justice; in fact, one of the murderers even won a seat in Congress the following year.[3]
7 Ocoee Massacre
Colloquially known as a “sundown town”, a phrase which was used to illustrate to the black visitors to the city they were not welcome once night fell, Ocoee, Florida was once the site of a horrific amount of violence. For nearly a year, voting rights activists had been encouraging the black citizens of the state to exercise their right to vote and many of the white citizens began to see it as an attack on their supremacy.
On November 2, 1920, a relatively wealthy African-American man named Mose Norman tried to vote but was turned away. Members of the KKK even took a gun away from him, a weapon he had brought to protect himself, and ordered him to go home. Later that day, a mob of whites, many of them KKK members, traversed the black neighborhoods looking for Norman before eventually deciding to head to the home of another prominent black man: July Perry. Eventually, they captured him, lynched him and burned his neighborhood down. The terror wrought by the mob was so great that Ocoee turned into an all-white town for decades.
During the 1920 census, around 500 black people called Ocoee home; in 1940, 1950, 1960 and 1970, every census taken revealed there to be no black citizens at all.[4]

6 New Orleans Massacre of 1866
Only one year after the Civil War ended, Republicans in the state of Louisiana were looking to give newly freed black men the right to vote. In fact, they went so far as to call a convention, trying to get it enshrined in the state constitution. The main reason for this was that the white voters, many of them Democratic Confederate veterans, were constantly passing racist laws, laws which would essentially reduce the black citizens of the state to a status akin to slavery.
On July 30, 1866, the convention commenced, with hundreds of Confederate veterans serving as “emergency police officers” and dozens of black men, many of them Union veterans, marching through the streets in support of the proposed changes. As tension continued to grow between the two groups, a shot rang out. Armed to the teeth and better prepared for violence than their counterparts, the white mob began attacking the black marchers. Lucien Jean Pierre Capla, a witness to the violence, later recalled: “I saw the people fall like flies.” (Capla and his son were both brutally attacked, suffering incredible wounds.)
When federal troops finally showed up, more than forty black men were dead, with over a hundred wounded from the fighting.[5]
5 New York City Draft Riots
As indicated by the name, the New York City draft riots of 1863 originally began as a violent opposition to a new federal conscription law which greatly increased the number of men who faced being called into the war. Two other factors also angered much of the citizenry: it was possible to pay for a substitute, though it was only available to the very wealthy, and African-Americans were exempt, as they were not considered citizens.
Like much of the racially motivated violence of the times, the anger of the working-class whites was inflamed by newspapers, publications which ran stories warning of a flood of newly freed men flooding the North with workers willing to undercut the pay of the whites of the area. So it went, on July 13, 1863, that the white mobs, initially only attacking federal buildings, would eventually turn their ire to the black working-class citizens of Manhattan. Over the course of four days, hundreds of black residents were forced from their homes and over 100 were killed, many of them lynched in the sort of violence usually reserved for the South.[6]

4 The Red Summer
Less an isolated incident and more a collection of similarly-themed violence, the Red Summer took place in 1919, as numerous African-Americans adjusted to civilian life after having returned home from WWI, alongside their fellow white veterans. Famed civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois said of the black veterans: “we are cowards and jackasses if now that the war is over, we do not marshal every ounce of our brain and brawn to fight a sterner, longer, more unbending battle against the forces of hell in our own land.”
Faced with men who were no longer willing to live under Jim Crow laws, many whites began to assault random black men throughout the country, especially those who had fought in the war. Though much of the violence occurred in the North, as the Great Migration dramatically changed the demographics of a number of major cities, the largest instance of violence occurred in the small town of Elaine, Arkansas. For three days, unspeakable violence was meted out to black sharecroppers who were trying to improve their working conditions; over 200 men, women and children were murdered because of it.[7]
3 Opelousas Massacre
For the white Democrats in Louisiana, 1868 was a tough year. Thanks to the votes of recently freed black men, Republicans won a vast majority of the elections that year. Faced with the prospect of losing their stranglehold on local and state politics, many racists, especially those in the Knights of the White Camellia (a pre-cursor to the KKK formed to stop Republican successes at the polls through intimidation) began violently oppressing all the black people they could get their hands on. Similar to the KKK, the Knights of the White Camelia was a white supremacist terrorist organization and they were extremely popular in the St. Landry Parish. (One Democratic newspaper estimated nearly one in four white people were members of the group.)
On September 28, 1868, as the U.S. Presidential election was beginning to inch closer, a local newspaper editor was beaten. Around a dozen black men came to his aid and they were subsequently arrested; however, they were later dragged out of jail and lynched. This was just the start of the violence that night: armed white people began scouring the countryside for every black person they could find and murdering them as soon as they did. By the time the violence subsided a few weeks later, somewhere between 200 and 300 African-Americans were killed. Republican Ulysses Grant won the presidency against the anti-black Democratic contenders Horatio Seymour and Francis Blair.[8]

2 Wilmington Insurrection of 1898
The site of the only coup d’état to take place on American soil, Wilmington, North Carolina was a hotbed of racial tensions in 1898. Having lost control of the state in 1894, the state’s Democrats changed their tactics, relying on an explicitly racist campaign platform, centered on the scourge of black men preying on innocent white women. However, the city council of Wilmington ended up being interracial, perhaps as a rebuff to the white supremacists.
Unwilling to face the changing face of their city, nearly 2,000 white men launched an attack. First, they burned a local newspaper, The Daily Record, to the ground. Next, they marched through the city, exiling black citizens and killing those unwilling to leave, murdering as many as 60 people. Finally, they forced the duly elected local government to resign at gunpoint, installing their own leadership who, only days prior, had promised to “choke the current of the Cape Fear River” with black bodies.[9]
1 Tulsa Race Riot
Unlike some of the incidents on this list, the Tulsa Race Riot can be traced to one specific incident: on May 30, 1921, a 19-year-old black man named Dick Rowland was accused of attacking a 17-year-old white elevator operator named Sarah Page. He was quickly arrested and the local police began an investigation. However, newspapers fanned the flames of racial violence by publishing more and more lurid reports about Rowland’s actions. Two separate mobs, one black and one white, descended on the courthouse, determined to either protect or kill Rowland, respectively.
Outnumbered, the black mob headed back to the Greenwood district, an area known as Black Wall Street because of the concentration of black businesses. Out for blood, as many as 10,000 white people crossed the railroad tracks in pursuit of the fleeing African-Americans. As dawn broke, nearly 35 whole city blocks had been burned to the ground and at least 300 black people had been killed. In an especially violent twist, Tulsa was likely the first American city to be bombed from the air as at least one local company was said to have allowed the white mob to use their planes to drop burning turpentine balls from the skies.[1

 

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Just downloaded this from the Library of Congress.


About this Item

Title


Family record. Before the war and since the war / Krebs Lithographing Company, Cincinnati.
Summary
A chart exhibiting two farms, contrasting slavery with freedom in connection with a family record.
Contributor Names
Krebs Lithographing Company.
Created / Published
c1880.
Subject Headings
- African Americans--History
- Slaves--United States--1800-1860
Format Headings
Chromolithographs--1880.
Family trees--1880.
Then & now comparisons--1880.
Genre
Family trees--1880
Then & now comparisons--1880
Chromolithographs--1880
Notes
- "Designed for the colored people of America by W. H. Cowell, Martin, Tennessee."
- Copyright no. 9131L.
Medium
1 print : chromolithograph.
Call Number/Physical Location
PGA - Krebs Litho. Co.--Family record (D size) [P&P]
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Digital Id
pga 01821 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pga.01821
cph 3g01733 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g01733
cph 3a33275 //hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a33275
Library of Congress Control Number
91721220
Reproduction Number
LC-DIG-pga-01821 (digital file from original print) LC-USZC4-1733 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-32757 (b&w film copy neg.)
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on publication.
Language
English
Online Format
image
Description
1 print : chromolithograph. | A chart exhibiting two farms, contrasting slavery with freedom in connection with a family record.
LCCN Permalink
https://lccn.loc.gov/91721220
Additional Metadata Formats
MARCXML Record
MODS Record
Dublin Core Record
 
Last edited:

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PRINCE RUPERT OF THE RHINE (Nephew of Charles I of England)
“Charles the second was, in the popular language of the day, a tall black man”
SOURCE;
(Norman Chevers, "An Enquiry into the circumstances of the Death of King Charles the Second"; 1861)
“In person Charles was tall, his complexion was swarthy”
SOURCES;
(Thomas Keightley, “The History of England, Volume 2; 1840)
(John Lingard, “A history of England from the first invasion by the Romans (to the Revolution in 1688”; 1827)
Definition of SWARTHY:
Black, Dark Brown, Tawny.
SOURCE;
(Samuel Johnson, “A Dictionary of the English Language; in which the Words are Deduced from Their Originals; and Illustrated in Their Different Significations ... Together with a History of the Language, and an English Grammar.”; Vol 4; 1818)
Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Duke of Cumberland, was a German army officer, admiral, scientist and colonial governor...
He first came to prominence as a Cavalier cavalry commander during the English Civil War...
Rupert was a younger son of the German prince Frederick V of the Palatinate and his wife Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of James VI of Scotland and I of England.
Prince Rupert had a varied career. He was a soldier from a young age, fighting alongside Dutch forces against the Habsburg Spain during the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648), and against the Holy Roman Emperor in Germany during the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648)
Aged 23, he was appointed commander of the Royalist cavalry during the English Civil War, becoming the archetypal "Cavalier" of the war and ultimately the senior Royalist general...
 

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Egyptian mummy speaks again after 3,000 years
By Tom Metcalfe - Live Science Contributor a day ago

The mummified body of the ancient Egyptian priest Nesyamun underwent medical scans in 2018 so that a copy of its vocal tract could be made.

The mummified body of the ancient Egyptian priest Nesyamun underwent medical scans in 2018 so that a copy of its vocal tract could be made.
(Image: © Leeds Teaching Hospitals/Leeds Museums and Galleries)

The voice of an ancient Egyptian priest has been heard for the first time in more than 3,000 years, thanks to a detailed reconstruction of his vocal tract from his mummified remains.
The project researchers used interior medical scans of the famous mummy of Nesyamun — now resting in the Leeds City Museum in the United Kingdom — to create a digital, 3D model of the insides of the individual's throat and mouth, which were reproduced on a 3D printer.
The 3D-printed vocal tract was then combined with an artificial larynx to recreate a single sound from Nesyamun's voice — a sound not heard since the 11th century B.C.
Related: Photos: The Amazing Mummies of Peru and Egypt
The researchers said the sound is a "fundamental frequency" of Nesyamun's voice, lying somewhere between the vowel sound in the English words "bed" and "bad."
But determining how Nesyamun's voice sounded was complicated by the position of the head of his mummy and its deterioration over time, the researchers said.

"Nesyamun's vocal tract posture is not set for speaking any specific vowel; rather it is set appropriate for his burial position," the researchers wrote in Scientific Reports. "In addition, his tongue has lost much of its muscle bulk, and his soft palate is missing."
Previous efforts to reproduce ancient voices could only approximate them, by animating facial reconstructions with software. In comparison, the sound of Nesyamun's voice is based on "an extant vocal tract preserved over three millennia," the researchers wrote.
Priest of Amun
Nesyamun's ornate coffin has been on display in Leeds since the 1820s and is one of the world's best-researched artifacts from ancient Egypt.

Nesyamun's ornate coffin has been on display in Leeds since the 1820s and is one of the world's best-researched artifacts from ancient Egypt. (Image credit: Leeds Museums and Galleries)

Nesyamun lived around 1100 B.C., during the reign of the 20th Dynasty Egyptian king Ramesses XI, according to the Leeds City Museum.
He rose to the high rank of "waab priest" at the temple complex at Karnak, near Luxor in Upper Egypt, on the east bank of the Nile River. That meant he was permitted to approach the statue of Amun, then the foremost of the ancient Egyptian gods, in Karnak's sacred inner sanctum.
Related: In Photos: 'Cachette of the Priests' Discovered in Luxor
Nesyamun is thought to have died in his late 50s from a severe allergic reaction. Almost 3,000 years later, his mummy was discovered at Karnak and transported to the Leeds City Museum in 1823. His remains and ornate coffin have since become some of the world's best researched relics of ancient Egypt.
Nesyamun's mummy was a good choice for studying the sound of an ancient voice, said David Howard, the lead author of the new research and a professor of electronic engineering at Royal Holloway, part of the University of London.
"It was particularly suited, given its age and preservation [of its soft tissues], which is unusual," Howard told Live Science.
He said he hopes the scientific understanding of how human voices are created can be combined with knowledge of the ancient Egyptian language to reconstruct longer passages of Nesyamun's speech.
Ancient voice
Detailed medical scans of the insides of the mummy's mouth and throat allowed researchers to create a three-dimensional model of the vocal tract.

Detailed medical scans of the insides of the mummy's mouth and throat allowed researchers to create a three-dimensional model of the vocal tract. (Image credit: D Howard et al, Scientific Reports)
The idea to re-create Nesyamun's voice came from a collaboration between Howard and his co-author, University of York archaeologist John Schofield.
Schofield had seen Howard demonstrate his "vocal tract organ," an instrument that produces sounds from 3D-printed copies of human vocal tracts, and the two scholars' discussions turned to Nesyamun's mummy. "The stars aligned, essentially," Schofield told Live Science.
Before examining the mummy, the researchers had to deal with ethical concerns related to examining a person without their consent. They used nondestructive research methods, and took into account inscriptions on his coffin, relating that Nesyamun hoped again to "to address the gods as he had in his working life."
The researchers interpreted that to indicate his desire to speak again after death. "We are in a way fulfilling his declared wishes," Howard said.
Howard and Schofield said they hope a reconstruction of Nesyamun's speech, perhaps reciting an ancient Egyptian prayer, can be featured at the Karnak temple in Egypt for modern tourists.
"When visitors encounter the past, it is usually a visual encounter," said Schofield. "With this voice, we can change that."

 

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Egyptian mummy speaks again after 3,000 years
By Tom Metcalfe - Live Science Contributor a day ago

The mummified body of the ancient Egyptian priest Nesyamun underwent medical scans in 2018 so that a copy of its vocal tract could be made.

The mummified body of the ancient Egyptian priest Nesyamun underwent medical scans in 2018 so that a copy of its vocal tract could be made.
(Image: © Leeds Teaching Hospitals/Leeds Museums and Galleries)

The voice of an ancient Egyptian priest has been heard for the first time in more than 3,000 years, thanks to a detailed reconstruction of his vocal tract from his mummified remains.
The project researchers used interior medical scans of the famous mummy of Nesyamun — now resting in the Leeds City Museum in the United Kingdom — to create a digital, 3D model of the insides of the individual's throat and mouth, which were reproduced on a 3D printer.
The 3D-printed vocal tract was then combined with an artificial larynx to recreate a single sound from Nesyamun's voice — a sound not heard since the 11th century B.C.
Related: Photos: The Amazing Mummies of Peru and Egypt
The researchers said the sound is a "fundamental frequency" of Nesyamun's voice, lying somewhere between the vowel sound in the English words "bed" and "bad."
But determining how Nesyamun's voice sounded was complicated by the position of the head of his mummy and its deterioration over time, the researchers said.

"Nesyamun's vocal tract posture is not set for speaking any specific vowel; rather it is set appropriate for his burial position," the researchers wrote in Scientific Reports. "In addition, his tongue has lost much of its muscle bulk, and his soft palate is missing."
Previous efforts to reproduce ancient voices could only approximate them, by animating facial reconstructions with software. In comparison, the sound of Nesyamun's voice is based on "an extant vocal tract preserved over three millennia," the researchers wrote.
Priest of Amun
Nesyamun's ornate coffin has been on display in Leeds since the 1820s and is one of the world's best-researched artifacts from ancient Egypt.'s ornate coffin has been on display in Leeds since the 1820s and is one of the world's best-researched artifacts from ancient Egypt.

Nesyamun's ornate coffin has been on display in Leeds since the 1820s and is one of the world's best-researched artifacts from ancient Egypt. (Image credit: Leeds Museums and Galleries)

Nesyamun lived around 1100 B.C., during the reign of the 20th Dynasty Egyptian king Ramesses XI, according to the Leeds City Museum.
He rose to the high rank of "waab priest" at the temple complex at Karnak, near Luxor in Upper Egypt, on the east bank of the Nile River. That meant he was permitted to approach the statue of Amun, then the foremost of the ancient Egyptian gods, in Karnak's sacred inner sanctum.
Related: In Photos: 'Cachette of the Priests' Discovered in Luxor
Nesyamun is thought to have died in his late 50s from a severe allergic reaction. Almost 3,000 years later, his mummy was discovered at Karnak and transported to the Leeds City Museum in 1823. His remains and ornate coffin have since become some of the world's best researched relics of ancient Egypt.
Nesyamun's mummy was a good choice for studying the sound of an ancient voice, said David Howard, the lead author of the new research and a professor of electronic engineering at Royal Holloway, part of the University of London.
"It was particularly suited, given its age and preservation [of its soft tissues], which is unusual," Howard told Live Science.
He said he hopes the scientific understanding of how human voices are created can be combined with knowledge of the ancient Egyptian language to reconstruct longer passages of Nesyamun's speech.
Ancient voice
Detailed medical scans of the insides of the mummy's mouth and throat allowed researchers to create a three-dimensional model of the vocal tract.'s mouth and throat allowed researchers to create a three-dimensional model of the vocal tract.

Detailed medical scans of the insides of the mummy's mouth and throat allowed researchers to create a three-dimensional model of the vocal tract. (Image credit: D Howard et al, Scientific Reports)
The idea to re-create Nesyamun's voice came from a collaboration between Howard and his co-author, University of York archaeologist John Schofield.
Schofield had seen Howard demonstrate his "vocal tract organ," an instrument that produces sounds from 3D-printed copies of human vocal tracts, and the two scholars' discussions turned to Nesyamun's mummy. "The stars aligned, essentially," Schofield told Live Science.
Before examining the mummy, the researchers had to deal with ethical concerns related to examining a person without their consent. They used nondestructive research methods, and took into account inscriptions on his coffin, relating that Nesyamun hoped again to "to address the gods as he had in his working life."
The researchers interpreted that to indicate his desire to speak again after death. "We are in a way fulfilling his declared wishes," Howard said.
Howard and Schofield said they hope a reconstruction of Nesyamun's speech, perhaps reciting an ancient Egyptian prayer, can be featured at the Karnak temple in Egypt for modern tourists.
"When visitors encounter the past, it is usually a visual encounter," said Schofield. "With this voice, we can change that."

They've got to be kidding, and the article reads like there was gonna be at least a prayer recited in his voice or something. I was half ass expecting the voice of an Englishman like in the old movies about Rome. :lol:

 

keone

WORLD WAR K
International Member
They've got to be kidding, and the article reads like there was gonna be at least a prayer recited in his voice or something. I was half ass expecting the voice of an Englishman like in the old movies about Rome. :lol:

these cacs dont care that these tombs are cursed
people that digg them up literally die
 

Shaka54

FKA Shaka38
BGOL Gold Member
these cacs dont care that these tombs are cursed
people that digg them up literally die
I can't remember the last time someone keeled over after exiting a tomb, but I believe that they found out that it was mold spores that were infecting the respiratory systems.
Not to mention, they always hire locals for the backbreaking labor and then THEY come running over to take credit for finding some shit and all they did was brushed some dirt aside.
 

keone

WORLD WAR K
International Member
I can't remember the last time someone keeled over after exiting a tomb, but I believe that they found out that it was mold spores that were infecting the respiratory systems.
Not to mention, they always hire locals for the backbreaking labor and then THEY come running over to take credit for finding some shit and all they did was brushed some dirt aside.
shhhitt translation leave the dead alone
 

Lexx Diamond

Art Lover ❤️ Sex Addict®™
Staff member
The 1919 Massacre Of Over 200 Blacks In The Elaine, Arkansas (Bitter History)
By
Liberty Writers Africa
-
February 3, 2020
0
187

The 1919 Massacre Of Over 200 Blacks In The Elaine, Arkansas

The Red Summer racial massacre in Elaine, Arkansas 1919, was one of the foremost race riots in America recorded during the early 20th century.
Though an exact number of casually is still unknown, an estimated 200 African Americans are said to have been killed along with five whites, during the racial massacre in Elaine, Arkansas. All of these were an effort to drive African Americans out of Philips County.
In a short book by Ida B. Wells, founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, he wrote of the violence and terror which was meted on African Americans, just because whites wanted them to leave Elaine.
Several popular tabloids owned by African Americans, like Chicago Defender, started generating several publications to campaign against the unsolicited drama.
There was a meeting arranged by African Americans on the night of September 30, 1919, with approximately 100 persons attending. A great number of attendees at the meeting convened by Progressive Farmers and Household Union of America at a church in Hoop Spur (a small community in Phillips County, Arkansas), were sharecroppers on the plantations of white landowners. The main focus of organizing the gathering was to find better payments for their crops, mostly cotton.
Aware of the white reservations for communalist influence on blacks, they had posted guards around the church premises to curtail interruption. However, during the meeting, three white men stepped up in front of the church, with one asking the guards “Going coon hunting, boys?” Immediately Gunfire burst forth after the guard had failed to respond.
Though there was a bit of debate as per who fired the gun, the guards ended up killing a security officer from the Missouri-Pacific Railroad named W. A. Adkins and injured the deputy sheriff, Charles Pratt. The next morning, an all-white group, led by the Sherrif, on their way to arrest the suspects, encountered little opposition from the black community.
The blacks outnumbered them in a ten-to-one situation, resulting in great fear of insurrection. The whites formed a mob numbering about 1000 fully armed men, with several of them coming from as far away as Tennessee, Mississippi, and surrounding counties. On arrival at Elaine, Arkansas, the armed mob began ransacking the African American homes and killing them.
As soon as the news of Attack started spreading in the African American community, some black residents armed themselves in defense while others fled. The attention of the mob was now to disarm the blacks who retaliated.
As against the African American papers, local white newspapers added a bit of gasoline in the fire by reporting that the uprising was planned by the Blacks. These false reports alerted the U.S. army, and troops were sent to Elaine immediately. Federal American troops rounded up and placed several hundred blacks in temporary enclosures, with some reports of torture.

They were considerable evidence that many of the soldiers sent to quash the violence engaged in the illogical killing of black residents. However, men were not released except when vouched for by their white employers.
As all of the violence will finally come to an end, 122 blacks were charged by the Phillips County grand jury for crimes related to the riots. 12 men were tried first for first-degree murder and were later convicted and sentenced to death as well. This prompted the other 65 to bargains and accepted up to 21 years for second-degree murder.
African Americans indicted for participating in Eliane, Arkansas Riot / Source: Public Domain
The NAACP led by Scipio Africanus Jones and other American civil rights groups worked on a possible retrial and release of Elaine Twelve, whom they eventually won.
Source: Black Past
 
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